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young children and gastroparesis

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Lynnieg123, Mar 15, 2012.

  1. Lynnieg123

    Lynnieg123 Approved members

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    Does anyone have any experiance with young children and gastroparesis? I'm suspecting it with my daughter and I now it usually happens after long term high BG but it can also have unknown causes. Wondering if anyone has experience with this they would be willing to share. How it was diagnosed, treated, affected BG, etc.
    Thanks,
     
  2. Flutterby

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    Whats happening for you to suspect gastroparesis? Its rare in kids, its a complication that happens years and years after diabetes. Of course it CAN happen a lot soon. I know of one family that is dealing with it, but thats very rare. My daughters CDE was dx with it after having diabetes for 35 years.
     
  3. Beach bum

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    It's very rare in kids. Have you taken her to a GI for a full workup? I see you are in So. NH, I'd request a referral down to Children's in Boston, they have an excellent ped. GI dept.

    I have gastroparesis, was diagnosed at age 39. In my case, it was idiopathic, meaning there is no explainable cause, though the doc thinks in my case the vagus nerve was damaged during pregnancy. I went through MANY tests before they were able to pinpoint what exactly was going up. I was tested for Celiac (all fingers pointed in that direction), and a whole battery of other things. I had an endoscopy, upper GI test, lower GI test, colonoscopy and then finally the gastric emptying test.

    I hope it's not gastroparesis. I definitely would push for a GI referal.
     
  4. Joretta

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    My 15 year old had inactive gastroparatinitis in the fall. They did the diagnosis after major stomach pain an vomiting. They said the vomiting caused it but appeared to be healing. She took medecine for it for a while.
     
  5. Flutterby

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    I didn't even notice you were in Southern NH, I'm there as well. We go to CHaD in Manchester if you don't want to go to childrens in Boston. We see a local pedi GI dr that is great.
     
  6. selketine

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    William had problems with food absorption when he was around the age of your daughter. It was random but similar to what can happen after a stomach virus when the person goes back to eating normally but needs MUCH less insulin. For a year we dealt with these random attacks and then it went away on its own (after I'd finally got in to see a pedi GI specialist and had the test ordered of course!).

    That experience leads me to believe there are other things that can seem like gastroparesis. I'm guessing that what he had was some sort of recurring intestinal bug? We never figured it out and it never returned after that year.
     
  7. Lynnieg123

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    Carol, your story sounds similar to ours.

    A little back story. Arden had pyloric stenosis when she was born (the bottom sphincter of her stomach was too tight and did not allow for food to pass to her intestines) as a result, she couldn't digest her food, had projectile vomitting and failure to thrive. She had stomach surgery at 4 months old to correct this. It doesn't come back but it is in the back of our minds.

    This year, she had the stomach bug with vomitting twice, just a few weeks apart. When she did manage to eat, there were a few times she threw up hours later and there was still a lot of food in her vomit that we felt should have been digested but maybe her illness was slowing it down. It has now been a month since her last bout and every day she complains of stomach pains and she gets full really fast yet is hungry more than usual.

    We also have not been able to get her insulin needs stable (as stable as you can get them anyway) since her illnesses. She keeps going low within an hour of eating and then really high after just 2 glucose tabs - so we thought maybe she is digesting slowly. Now we are toying with square wave and dual wave boluses for every meal but it hasn't made a difference yet. She just tested negative for celiacs at the end of February. I remembered hearing about gastroparesis and that it can happen for unknown reasons so I thought maybe this was possible. She'll be 146 at 10pm and then by midnight be 250 eventhough she hasn't eaten since 6pm. (we're checking her extra because her BGs keep fluctuating so much) This also makes me wonder if she is digesting REALLY slowly.

    Part of me wonders if her constant stomach aches are sort of in her head and a way to get attention. She is a triplet and they are always trying to get extra one-on-one attention as you can imagine. On the other hand, I don't want to ignore it and have it actually be something. It is starting to stress me out. Her BGs are ranging from mid 300s to 50s and her diet hasn't changed much.

    Sorry this is so long, I'm just worried and want to figure this out so we can have her at least near her target range once in awhile.
     
  8. selketine

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    William's issues would last about 2 weeks and then his stomach would go back to absorbing normally.

    He also has some bouts of severe constipation - and that seemed to be one factor but not always directly related to the slow absorption.

    Considering the issue with her stomach at birth - I think having a very savvy GI doctor take a look at her issue would be in order. William also complained of stomach aches a lot back then.

    He wasn't on a cgms then either - but have you considered one? He has used one for several years now and I can see how that would give you some insight into what is really going on. Even if you could borrow one from the doctor's office, etc. - a few weeks of it would give you some great insight.

    I know back when William had his problem - other parents were reporting the same thing with their kids - and their kids were not sick. William's seemed to go on the longest though! It would just happen out of the blue and was completely insane - sometimes he didn't need insulin barely at all (for meals) for days - and it took a long time to go back to his usual insulin needs.

    Wish I had more answers but I definitely suggest seeing a pedi GI specialist because of your daughter's history.
     
  9. Beach bum

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    Considering her history, I would definitely request a full GI work up. Has she been screened for Celiac? I'd ask for that, and the gastric emptying test (really easy,non invasive).

    I think it will give you the answers and peace of mind you need.
     
  10. SarahKelly

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    Have you done a food diary along with a log of the BG that correlate. I believe that Isaac has very slow digestion whenever he is less active (ie sleeping, napping, in the car, watching a cartoon, etc) this seems to require a much higher temporary basal rate depending upon the food eaten prior to this inactive period. Foods that give us the most trouble are anything with milk in it (ice cream, yogurt, etc), rice, or restaurant mac-n-cheese. We've figured this out with a lot of logging, discussion with my spouse and just paying attention to Isaac. Another odd thing we've seen, that his doc has no understanding for and hasn't seen before, is that on the occasion that he wakes up above 200 and then if he goes #2 shortly after waking his BG drops rapidly - almost like the food sitting in his gut is what is causing his high BG then when it's gone bam, low. We see the same thing with apple juice, as great as it can be at bringing BG up if it causes him to poo frequently it's really no help at all! Sorry if TMI
    I think that in small children, not just age, but size the amount and type of food has a big effect on them. So, even if their gastric system is functioning as per norm we may see a greater up/down in their BG due to the type and timing of certain foods.
    Just my opinion and experience :) Take care
     
  11. Joretta

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    Okay what you say about some foods seems so true for us. My DD is sensitive to milk and when she gives in to an occasional ice cream she has stomach issues and her sugars go all. Now I'm going to watch bowel movements and how they effect her.
     
  12. deafmack

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    Hi, Sorry to hear your daughter is having digestion issues. Gastroparesis is usually diagnosed with a gastric emptying test. The treatment ranges from diet and/or medications to diet and medication. My Mother has gastroparesis due to systemic scleroderma. She eats several small meals a day and I have to prepare foods for her that are easy to digest and easy to swallow.
    The medications for gastroparesis can have side effects that you don't want so going with diet etc is probably the best route. Like a previous poster mentioned I would strongly suggest using a CGM as well as keeping a food diary. It would help to see if eating certain foods are bringing on the symptoms and help you to isolate those culprits, etc. I hope that your daughter does not have gastroparesis and that you are able to find a solution to this challenge. Wishing you the best.
     
  13. Beach bum

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    But also for this, it could be as complex as delayed gastric emptying, or as simple as lactose intolerance. I'd keep a food diary.
     
  14. Beach bum

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    Yes, the GET is really the only way to truly see that there is a problem. It's a long test (90 minutes plus), but non-invasive. You just eat some food with diodes in it and then lay down and get scanned. I started off on meds for about 6 months, then when things started quieting down I was able to get off that and keep things under control with diet. I do pretty well though I occasionally have a flare up.

    Again really the best thing to do is consult with your doctor about a GI referral.
     

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