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wondering how many parents "hide" eating?!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by pumpingdaughter, Jan 26, 2007.

  1. pumpingdaughter

    pumpingdaughter Approved members

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    I find myself "hiding" or "sneeking" a treat when I am emotionaly tired of the routine of diabetes. Yes Ella is on the pump....but not old enough to do all the steps on her own. Checking her own BG is still a work in progress and never mind knowing how to bolus for her snack. Since Ella was dx. at 14 months I have a hard time recalling when I didn't eat with her when not dealing with diabetes! I was surprised to see that this post has been one of subject since I posted a few days ago about this! Anyways hope everyone has a good start to there week:)
    Bonnie, mom to Ella age 4 dx.Feb04 pumping animas
     
  2. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    Sorry, I'm going to have to disagree with you. If a child is continually left out of things because of diabetes, he will most likely develop psychological issues later in life. I've seen this many times first hand. And that is why our endos office has a psychologist, social worker, and dietican on staff that we see almost every 3 months along with the doctor, nurse and diabetes educator. They've seen the psychological damage diabetes can do, too, and they have heavily warned me about it. I think a lot of others will agree with me.
     
  3. caspi

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    I guess maybe I feel differently because food isn't a major issue in our house and snacks are just that - snacks. Cameron has plenty of food that he can eat when he wants to and has never complained about it. His brother (who is 3 years older) has his afternoon snack when he gets home from school an hour before Cameron does. He always has. Cameron never questioned what his brother was eating before, nor does he now. So I can't see any psychological harm being done..........
     
  4. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    Just wanted to add one more thing you are probably aware of. There are other insulin options out there that will allow children to eat whatever they want, whenever they want. Lantus and Humalog/Novolog will do that. Or a pump can do that. Kids with D should be able to eat just like normal kids. Even 2 or 3 cookies!!! If that's something your son wants, have you talked to his doctor about changing what kind of insulin he's on?
     
  5. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    And every child is different. If my son were to find out that his brother has cookies and he doesn't, he would be sooooo angry and we'd hear about it for the next MONTH!!! I wasn't trying to judge you, just trying to say be careful of the time when he does start to care about what everyone else eats and wants to fit in with everyone else. :cwds:
     
  6. Threebeans

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    If there is an under ground club for sneaking a treat not on my sons diet, i would be the president. Lunch time during the week is the prime hunting time for the "off" diet items.

    David
     
  7. Hollyb

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    Not HIDE, exactly. But John and I went to a friend's for dinner last night and took a dessert I would not have bought to share with Aaron. He does eat dessert, but this was an insane combo of carbs and fat (not something we should eat either) and just too, too much.

    He's been bugging me for months to make fudge -- something we used to do once or twice a year and haven't since his diagnosis. I did, but I didn't want it hanging around for a long time, KWIM? So I felt it was only my duty to eat a LOT of it. There are certain sacrifices you just have to make for your child!!
     
  8. caspi

    caspi Approved members

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    Cameron is on Lantus and Humalog. Pumps aren't an option with his endo until he's 10 and presently he says he doesn't want one anyway. We'll cross that bridge when the time comes. His endo built in two 15g snacks per day and one 30g snacks at night. He is allowed certain cookies - his favorite snack is a Nilla Sundae - Nilla wafers on the bottom of the bowl crushed up, sugar free jello piled on top, with a blast of whipped cream - all for 15g. That's why I'm saying he doesn't miss out on anything. I was merely talking about the chocolate chip cookies that I purchased last week on sale that I have, yes, hidden from him. They're 15g per cookie and one cookie just isn't going to satisfy him....
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2007
  9. A&Ds Mommy

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    Since I am currently breastfeeding Aidan I need to eat snacks at times other than when Dylan has his snacks, so I do find myself sneaking in a quick snack here and there. For the most part I do try to have a snack when he does.
     
  10. bogusrogus

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    I always have to remind myself that if i want a snack, eat when she does. That doesn't mean I don't sneak food, of course I do. Most of the time I just wait til she is gone to bed before i have any ice cream:p
     
  11. hrermgr

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    GUILTY! But I sometimes do it to my other kids and husband! Bad, bad, bad....
     
  12. Chase's mom

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    LOL we have a small fridge in our bedroom closet, and we lock our br doors so the kids can't get in when we are gone. My kids definately get there share of junk food.
     
  13. KatelinsMom

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    :D I do refrain from snacking right in front of my newly diagnosed 15-year-old daughter. I feel guilty as she is having a hard time adjusting to not being able to just graze when she feels like it or pop a piece of candy in her mouth out of the blue without having to count the carbs, etc. She does have sugar-free popsicles and other snacks that she enjoys. I still feel bad and find it easier to have things when she is not around.
     

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