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When we do start pumping, any tips?

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by DiabetesMama, Sep 7, 2015.

  1. DiabetesMama

    DiabetesMama Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
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    I know there are going to be some major changes, but could anybody kind of tell us what all is involved? I know there will be plenty of testing but beyond that, what can we expect? Anything from insets to insulin usage to finger sticks... anything that might be useful to us and others who are about to start would be greatly appreciated! I think not knowing things makes it harder to except. :triumphant:
     
  2. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    Feb 6, 2014
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    Pumping is very much a YDMV kind of thing, so I have no "generic, one-size-fits-all" advice other than the following:

    Pumping will almost feel like being diagnosed all over again (minus the drinking everything in sight, peeing like a racehorse, vomiting, +/- DKA, hospitalization, etc.) The learning curve is steep and you may want to tear your hair out. (The most frustrating part for us was how CONSERVATIVE our "team" was regarding dosing; my daughter would have been riding the 300s waves two months out of I hadn't just ended up nodding like a compliant idiot but taking things into my own hands with the help of the wonderful veterans here on this Forum.) The initial frustration is great, but the rewards of pumping are even greater. My biggest pieces of advice: read everything you can about pumping (Think like a Pancreas and Walsh's book, and all the threads pertaining to pumping on this Forum), TAKE THE PLUNGE, and ask questions HERE (unless your endo uses a pump her/himself.) And keep repeating to yourself "This WILL be worth it!"

    ETA: You've already taken the first step: get a Dexcom and learn how to use it.

    Good luck and remember that everyone is here for you!


    Edited again to add: You don't actually have to read every single word of the books I recommended and all the Forum threads, but at least give them a heartfelt skim...
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2015
  3. DiabetesMama

    DiabetesMama Approved members

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    LOL! I actually have read the WHOLE Pink Panther Cgm and Pump book! If I had that book I would have already read it too. When my son was diagnosed, I found everything I could and read, read, and read and tried absorbing like a sponge! I have been taking this site in parts, but that's how one eats an elephant, right? Part by part, bite by bite! That's how I have approached this disease, learn one thing, learn more, ask questions, try things out and eliminate what doesn't work. Thanks for all the encouragement! I love how supportive everyone is here. We are all in this together and we can really help others by just being there and suggesting things that have worked for us. So far all of his A1c's have been 6.5 and lower so we must be doing something right. God bless all or you for all your help!:triumphant:
     
  4. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    There are so many reasons why one might start pump ing, my oldest do at 13 months, we go her on a pump at 18 months because MD I was not working andon't no. Honeymoon to speak of. My youngest, we put on a CCM pro to insulin and used that info to tell us when to start pumping.

    Have in working in the schools I know that some districts look differently On a pump insulin dose and a delegated person other than a nurse.

    So, I depends on your circumstance.

    But matbe if your child is not in the public setting it would help finding others that would feel comfortable with button pressing compared to doing a physical shot.
     
  5. quiltinmom

    quiltinmom Approved members

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    Some people have a hard time at pump start, but for us it was nearly seamless. Maybe we were lucky...I just want to say that it's not always hard.

    Starting the pump was a complete game changer for us--for the good. Life suddenly seemed so much easier, less stuff to carry all the time (or forget at home) and he could eat without having to choose betwern no shot or no snack. It was great.

    I was worried I would forget how to change a site. The pump walks you through site changes, it practically won't let you mess it up.

    I was concerned about dka from a bad site, but so far it has only happened once (and there were other circumstances that contributed). We have always caught bad sites before it caused a real problem. And we haven't had a bad site in a long time.

    That's all I can think of right now, maybe I'll add more if I think of anything else.
     

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