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Whats in your pantry- just curious?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by jkrjk, May 8, 2014.

  1. jkrjk

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    So this is not meant to be a controversial post by any means, but I know it seems to be a hot topic. I really just wanted to get a general feeling of what your type 1 kids eat or don't eat? I am still new to this…9 yr old daughter diagnosed 6 months ago, but her eating habits have not changed at all- they are pretty much the same as my other kiddos.

    What this specifically means is that we generally eat pretty healthy most of the time, but definitely still have "kid food" around. There are fruity pebbles in my pantry- does she have them every morning? no. But probably once a week? She has dessert when the other kids have dessert. We have approached this as trying to make her life as normal as possible- I didn't have a huge pantry clean out when we got home from the hospital.

    Just wondering how others have handled it? Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Christopher

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    I am tempted to advise you to delete this thread (half-way kidding). Because it sounds like what you are doing is working for you and makes a lot of sense. Your child is eating reasonably healthy, but has not drastically changed their diet because of diabetes. That is great! Your approach about making things as normal as possible is really good also, especially for a newly dx family. So it really shouldn't matter what other people do or don't do.

    That said, I completely understand the need to hear what others do and maybe reinforce the way you are handling things. I hope you get a lot of good responses and also that they don't change what you are doing because I think you are doing fine. :smile:

    Oh, to answer your question, our pantry is the same as it was before diabetes, there is only one thing that is no longer there (and it wasn't really there much to begin with) and that is the "evil"......PopTarts!!
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
  3. jkrjk

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    Man, I was afraid of that… thanks so much for the warning. I think I'll hang in there for a minute, but the potential to bail is highly likely) ;)
     
  4. Christopher

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    No, no I think you will be pleasantly surprised with the responses you get. :smile: I believe most people have the same philosophy as you do.
     
  5. jkrjk

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    And thanks so much for your advice and encouragement Chris- the pop tart devil made me laugh :)
     
  6. danwh72

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    We are almost identical to yours. After the diagnosis, we certainly carry more "sweets" than we did before, but we still strive to maintain the same type of pre-diabetes diet. One thing I have noticed is that dessert has become a little more frequent. I'm not sure if it's a way to fill carbs or a way to make sure our son still experiences treats. It's not too often though.

    We are on the NPH/Rapid regime, so there is the need to occasionally feed the insulin monster. Once we are on the pump, it will be interesting to see if our diet changes a bit.
     
  7. Christopher

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    You are welcome. You know, I have found that there are just some things that no matter how hard I try, I just can't make work, and PopTarts are one of them. Plus they are not very healthy to begin with so it is better (for us) to just not even deal with them.
     
  8. mmgirls

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    boxes / bags / cans all with pretty little nutrition labels on them.

    The only thing that my girls don't have is regular soda or juice, we keep that for lows.

    They eat a small desert nearly every night after dinner, just finishing up Halloween candy when easter hit. I do pay attention to portion sizes more than anything else, my 9 years old eats about 175 carbs a day.
     
  9. wearingtaci

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    We are pretty average,except we don't do a ton of processed foods,not because I'm a food purist,but because I'm cheap and it is cheaper to make things from scratch. For the most part we eat a healthy diet,which at times is veggie heavy,because we love fruits and veggies
    We don't have dessert every night,but when we do Sophie eats the same as her non d siblings
    With a few rare exceptions she eats the exact same thing as the rest,even having slightly diluted fruit juice with meals
     
  10. rgcainmd

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    For better or for worse, our pantry looks about the same. We are not the healthiest of eaters, but we are improving. I found that if I make changes too quickly, my daughter feels as if she is being punished for having T1D. So we will continue to improve our diet, but slowly, step by step.
     
  11. virgo39

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    Our pantry is the same except that we never used to have juice boxes--now we have them on hand for lows.
     
  12. Beach bum

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    Ours is pretty much the same, except we too have juice boxes. We've tossed the Frosted Mini Wheats, because for us, they are the devil in disguise:blue:
    Do what works for your family, don't worry about the Fruity Pebbles, it's not like you do it every day. I think the most important thing is to remember, everything in moderation.
     
  13. Snowflake

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    We're two years in. We were already working on improving our hectic 2-working-parent mealtime staples when our daughter was diagnosed. I do think T1 made us pay even more attention to offering a well-balanced diet and at least trying to limit fluff -- at some point, I started thinking in terms of "empty carbs" rather than "empty calories". :)

    We have slowly figured out which foods have a particularly pernicious effect on blood sugar, like the long and unpredictable tail of ice cream, and we do limit those. Even with us being more conscious about it, though, my daughter still does get her fair share of kid food.

    On the topic of dessert specifically, I'll mention one other tactic that would probably only placate the preschool set: a reliable go-to treat for us has been mini chocolates. As a 4 yr old with a little tummy, my daughter is totally content with a Hershey's kiss or two, or a mini Dove square, as a dessert. They scratch the psychological itch, but they're very low carb, and the small amount of chocolate seems to have minimal effect on her bgs afterward. However, I don't think I'll be able to buy her off that way when she's 7 or 8!
     
  14. Beach bum

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    We don't offer desert on a regular basis. Never have. Definitely reserved for special times. More because I know it's too easy of a trap for myself to fall into! If they say they are still hungry after dinner, then I always make sure I have an assortment of fruit. Now that the weather is warm we also have popsicles (I like the whole fruit brand).
     
  15. tammy82

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    Our pantry is pretty much the same too, except more juice & diet soda. We try not to restrict too much we just find a way to make it work. I also buy the little chocolates as a small treat after dinner as the chocolate has some fat in it unlike the straight sugary candies so that works out nicely. Every once in a while my daughter can have the gummies or if she is low. If it is a food that we have a problem with try to eat it at a certain time. We also do milk & cookies before bed.
     
  16. bamaboyd82

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    Our pantry is largely the same...we never had juice and rarely had candy before, but of course now, we've got lots of both. We did cut out the Saturday morning doughnut run my husband did with the children, and we now buy whole wheat bread instead of honey wheat. Also, mac and cheese hasn't gone well for us, so I don't serve much of that anymore.

    Tammy82, I'm interested about the milk and cookies before bed. Do you do that because it somehow helps her numbers in the night or just because it's delightful? Because we could all get on board with therapeutic milk and cookies at our house! :)
     
  17. Annapolis Mom

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    Because this board skews towards the more conscientious parents, I always want to speak up for the unhealthy eaters. My family does not follow a healthy diet--plenty of cookies, ice cream, sugar cereals, etc. It is not healthy for anyone to eat this way, but I just want to make the point that a type 1 diagnosis does not require a healthy diet, it just makes it more important to have one.

    That said, I do try to model a "more healthy" diet for my daughter and talk to her about the importance of healthy eating. Over the years she has made small changes to her diet and decided on her own to eat more fruits and vegetables. Recently she has talked about eating less junk. My goal is to make sure that she doesn't hate diabetes for keeping her from eating the way her friends do. At the same time, the older she gets, the more she sees that eating healthy has an immediate effect on how she feels (more and more sensitive to highs).

    So far I feel that things are going the way I want them to--that she is making healthier decisions as she gets older and she feels that these decisions are her choice.
     
  18. bettycrackpot

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    We are only 2 months from DX, the only "real" change is now i spend 30 min or so once a week pre-measuring snacks and writing the carb counts on the bags. and when his 9 yr old sister has a snack, so does my Dbaby. we are on lantus and humalog MDI.
     
  19. sincity2003

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    Our pantry didn't change much when he was diagnosed last January. It was now more about portion sizes and counting the carbs. Prior to diagnosis, he rarely had a treat before bed. When he was first diagnosed, he was on NPH and R and we were told to give him 1/2 cup of full fat ice cream prior to bed to, one, keep his sugar up overnight, and two, to put some of his weight back on. Once he had put his weight back on, we cut it down to every other night. Now, probably in the last five months or so, he has it maybe twice a week, if that?
    We tried the milkshake experiment at Steak N Shake and it was a disaster, so those will not be happening unless it's a special group outing or something. We eat out a lot, too, and his choices prior to diagnosis were vegetables over French fries, grilled chicken over fried chicken tenders anyway. He's a weird kid LOL.
    Now, this week we got a confirmed diagnosis of Celiac disease, so the pantry IS getting a complete overhaul this weekend because gluten is in everything apparently. (sigh).
     
  20. jkrjk

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    I have tons of juice around too now- and definitely a lot of little chocolate and candies that she can pop in and go. Great for her lows, not good for stay at home mom passing by them every 30 minutes. :) I am thinking its time for us to start a food journal so we can start to see what really effects her and what doesn't…
     

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