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what to say????

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by shirley83006, Sep 22, 2013.

  1. shirley83006

    shirley83006 Approved members

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    For 7 years since my daughters diagnosis, I get those who are type 2 and or have family members that are type 2. Always seem to act like there is no difference between type 1 and 2 like one day my dauter went out with a group of ladys, and my daughter was having a low. So she treated herself as she normallywould. And the one lady said that she learned from a class that you should have applesauce that it will bring up sugar slower, it won't spike up your bg. Well duh, youneed to bring it up fast. They tell youyou need to excercise, . Let me tell you, a lot of people I know, are type 2. And I neversee them check there bloodsugars. I don't say anything. I would like to but I don't. Cause I know it won't do a thing. Don't see them excercise, nor do they watch what they eat. What doyou say to those people without hurtingthem. Sometghing educational as well???? Thanks
     
  2. Caysie98

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    When someone says they have type 2 and acts like it's the same thing, I just tell them that I have type 1, which is where my body doesn't make insulin, rather than type 2, which is insulin resistance.

    If I were you I wouldn't say anything about them never testing or exercising. It's their business and I doubt you'd want someone telling you to take better care of yourself.
     
  3. nebby3

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    With some people I just find myself saying a lot: "actually it works differently with type1. They are really different diseases." either people listen to you right away or they never get it.
     
  4. mocha

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    Maybe something like "That may work for you, but it doesn't work for us. We've found that this works best for us, and we'll be sticking with that."
     
  5. MomofSweetOne

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    I've learned to comment that Type 1 and Type 2 are completely different beasts with a faulty pancreas in common. If they're interested, I'll explain more and if not, I've said my important bit.
     
  6. Shopgirl2091

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    I find a lot of people who are amazed that Type 1 is an autoimmune disorder - they think it is so closely related to Type 2 that diet and exercise should fix everything. Or, not eating wheat, or some other crazy idea like that.

    I kindly thank them for their input - I know they are just trying to help - but explain that I don't think it will bring my child's pancreas back to life.

    I wish there was more knowledge of the disease because sometimes the comments can be hurtful, but there are always those people that no matter how much you try to explain will still never get it.
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Unless your daughter is bothered or hurt by the remarks then I'd probably not say much. Obviously, a simple, "it's type 1, not type 2" but if they aren't interested in it, and your daughter can shrug it off, then why waste any energy?

    People say stupid things all the time. I'd let it go.
     
  8. wilf

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    Agreed. :cwds:
     
  9. ChaosRules

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    My son is older, so I let him handle it if he's there. If he's not there, and someone finds out my son has diabetes and starts to say ignorant things about it, I usually can't help myself - I have to explain. I don't say anything about Type 2 people other than to say that my son isn't one of them.

    I start off by telling them that my son has Type 1, not Type 2. If I get a blank stare, I'll say "It's the one that used to be called Juvenile Diabetes." Most of the time people realize that that was a different disease than the one they're thinking of. Often, I'll also say that it's unfortunate that Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes have such similar names, because they really are totally different diseases. It often shocks people to hear that he can eat whatever he wants, he just has to give himself the right amount of insulin for it.

    If the person seems interested, I'll explain Type 1 in more detail.

    If someone said something to me like the applesauce comment, I would probably say that my son has Type 1, not Type 2 diabetes, so he has to treat it differently than Type 2 people.
     
  10. Beach bum

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    Unless your daughter is bothered by it, I'd say nothing. If you want to try and attempt to tell them something, I'd just say that they are two very different conditions that share a common name. One the pancreas doesn't work at all (T1) and one the pancreas works a little (T2).
     
  11. ksartain

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    We're dealing with this with Christopher's grandmother, my husband's mother. She just doesn't get it. Luckily she doesn't wonder why Chris never gets to spend time alone with her. She pretty much checked out as a grandma to him when he was diagnosed. :(
     
  12. missmakaliasmomma

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    Although we'd really like to say "shut the hell up, when my kids low, we need fast sugar (lol), Id just say they are 2 very different diseases.

    Honestly, if I know someone with type 2 and they aren't taking care of it, I'm not afraid to tell them what could happen if they continue to not take care of themselves.
     
  13. shirley83006

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    Thanks for all your comments, it really would be nice if it had a different name.
     
  14. shannong

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    I have an aunt who has type 2 and is on oral medication and does a blood check once a week, try to tell me that her disease was just as tough as what my son is dealing with. Okay, that irritated me.

    But I also have a father-in-law who has had Type 2 for 25 years and has been injecting insulin for his diabetes for 20 years. He has a very difficult time controlling his blood sugars, and generally runs very high bg's. He has always lived a healthy lifestyle and is not overweight - but his father, and his father before him, all had Type 2 diabetes, so he has a genetic pre-disposition to the disease.

    I also recently went to a my son's friend's birthday party. I asked the host if they would mind if I stayed during the party because my son has Type 1 Diabetes. She said no problem, she totally understood because her Mom has Type 2 diabetes. In my head I'm thinking, they are totally different. But later at the party, I learned that her mother was in kidney failure because of her uncontrolled diabetes. She was sad and angry that her mother's diabetes was largely uncontrolled.

    Anyway, I am learning that Type 1 and Type 2 are different diseases, but Type 2 Diabetes is still a very serious disease too, and there are many myths surrounding both diseases.
     
  15. mmgirls

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    I freely admit to others that I don,t know much about Type 2, that it is a hard diagnosis with many ways to treat it. I continue to say that my daughters body no longer makes insulin and also does not have a normal response to a low blood sugar that someone that t2 may still have.
     
  16. kirsteng

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    I think that's a really important thing to add - and almost no type 2's realize that... they think type 1's and type 2's share the same problem, which is managing high blood sugars long term. They think type 1 is like the endgame of type 2. I have found type 2's (and many other people without diabetes besides) are shocked to hear about the constant threat (and danger) of low blood sugar... it really is the most important difference, IMO.
     
  17. cdninct

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    I really struggle to understand type 2, too. I thought I had it figured out until my father-in-law was diagnosed. He is not on oral drugs or insulin, and he will certainly spike if he doesn't eat "responsibly," but he spends more of his day fending off lows, which can leave him shaky and which have caused him to pass out, than worrying about highs. While I don't understand why this is happening (and I suspect there is more to the story, but do you know how hard it is for a type 2 to get a referral to, and decent care from, an endo?), it has certainly made me appreciate that type 2 is the same sort of mixed bag that type 1 can be.
     
  18. kirsteng

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    I didn`t realize type 2`s get hypoglycemia too caroline... My MIL has had type 2 for 10 years and never had a low or anything close to it. Have you heard of other type 2`s that get lows as well
     
  19. cdninct

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    Kirsten--I don't think it's typical at all in those who are controlling their numbers using diet alone; I really think there might be two things going on simultaneously, but only one has been figured out. He was actually diagnosed after passing out from what we now realize was a low BG. They tested everything including doing a fasting BG and then a GTT. He now tests with every meal and when he feels off (thanks to our type 1 advice, not the advice of his doctors!), so his weird numbers are pretty well-documented.

    Like I said, it seems atypical to me, but it has definitely opened my eyes to the fact that I tended to look at type 2 as being much more straightforward and uniform than type 1 when that just might not be the case!
     
  20. shannong

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    Yes, Type 2's can have hypoglycemic episodes. My MIL had to call 911 because my FIL went unconscious due to a low. He had to have glucagon administered. After his heart attack, 9 months ago, his bg's were very difficult to control. From that point on, my MIL has to check him at 3am every night, because he has had several bad lows.
     

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