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What to do about a blood CHECKAHOLIC!!!!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by momof2here, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. momof2here

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    Johnny is testing 25x's a day.

    He tells me he feels weak, he feels sick, he feels low, he feels high etc.

    1/3 of the time, at most, he is out of his range but over 1/2 of those times he is testing shortly after eating anyway. I have explained this to him and it is not working. He had a low a few weeks ago and hasn't been the same since.

    What can I do about this? I have already tried to limit him but, when he is claiming that he feels bad (weak, headache, stomache, anxious etc.) I really cannot deny it anyway.

    What should I do? I have tried to get him to really pay attention to how he feels when he has tested and it shows that he is high or low, by the same token I have told him to pay close attention to all of these times that he is in range and he has claimed he was sick - really realizing how he feels so that he can be a better judge.

    He never had a problem before he had that one low - he not only did not have a problem with excessive testing, he also new if he was high and needed a correction. That one low was his only 'real' low other than one time at school but it wasn't low like the one he had recently. The recent one was 52 and he said he felt worse than he has ever felt.

    Any advise??????
     
  2. Midwestmomma

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    In my thinking....maybe he needs to "talk" to someone about this and his anxieties with D. Do I think this is "normal"...no....I have to "make" my kid test the times he does a day. I am not trying to be rude in saying this, but I think it may be needed. I do hope he finds a little peace with it all. And yes, testing right after a meal is not a good number to go by.....maybe limit him to check no closer than an hour or 2 after...and no closer.


    ((hugs)) for you and him..
     
  3. momof2here

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    Thank you so much... good advise :) I will try and I will work on getting him someone to talk to as well....
     
  4. Midwestmomma

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    Maybe call the Endo office..and see if they have a Psychiatrist (sp?) to talk to...I do know we have had to meet once ot twice with them as a routine vist at Endo. And they may also have a counselor there too. And they may "specialize" in helping with D things like this.
     
  5. Kalebsmom

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    It sounds like the low scared him enough that he may be a little paranoid now.

    I would be concerned if my child was testing 25 times a day. I agree that maybe he should speak to someone.

    Even checking that many times a day a low could sneak in there.

    I hope he gets some help soon. It has to be wearing on him.
     
  6. moco89

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    I know you are recently dxed, and you are about to start a pump.....but maybe you should also consider a CGMS.

    He obviously has fear of the unknown, as in he doesn't feel safe unless he knows his blood sugars at all times. A CGMS fixes this problem, for the most part.

    But, I would absolutely talk to somebody first, and the cgms could be reassuring for him, but it is possible it could exacerbate the problem, too, unless the ongoing issue is not addressed.

    I apologize for a past post awhile back, and you should never doubt your son's feelings or judge whether it is D problems or not. But, I think it is appropriate to get him somebody to talk to. I think he is definitely scared. That's very likely, imo.
     
  7. Tori's Mom

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    Oh wow!! I feel bad for him. That low must have been super scary for him. I agree with TrestonsMom....you may have to place some limits--if only for the preservation of his poor fingertips!!!! :eek:

    Unfortunately, this low is not the last one he will ever have.
    It can feel really scary but it is also important for him to understand and have confidence that even though he goes low, he will be alright. Yes, he will feel crappy for a while but he will be ok.
    Also in your original post you said he would previously recognize highs but not that he previously recognized lows. Maybe some reassurance that as time goes on he will be able to recognize the lows would help too. I don't know, I just feel really bad for him as I can imagine how scared and anxious he must be feeling to be testing that often in a day. Poor thing.

    Yes, they also have to know that more serious things can happen with severe lows but all in good time....gotta get him through this fear right now.

    Do you have a CDE that has done education with him so he knows what to expect, etc??? Sometimes we take for granted that people "know" these things when the issues haven't been discussed. Being so newly diagnosed, maybe he just has misconceptions and needs more information.
     
  8. Darryl

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    First - be proud of him that he takes such an interest in self-care.

    Second - He sounds like a "numbers" person. Without knowing his BG he feels anxiety. The numbers do matter, and that is not something he should be talked out of.

    My advice - He sounds like an excellent candidate for a CGM.
     
  9. ecs1516

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    My older son is 12 and he had issues with checking alot too. Not that much but excessive. Especially right before bed. Maybe check 5 times before he could go to sleep. His extra checking started after a bad low where he felt really bad and scared.
    We found a good 'therapist'. He said Eric had OCD and OCPD issues. You can PM me if you want. It has gotten much better.
     
  10. GaPeach

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    We had this problem for a little while. Like your son, it began with a bad low. My DD is almost 11. It also coincided with a few weeks of wacky numbers due to a wide variety of factors (puberty, field trips, school nurse absence, teacher absent for 2 1/2 weeks for jury duty, warm weather.)

    As I continued to "tweak" the insulin basals/bolus, the numbers improved. Once #'s stabilized and she was feeling better, she backed off the testing on her own.

    You may want to try sticking to a meal plan with all meals and snacks on a schedule. If his carb intake is fairly the same amount and time for a few days, he may regain confidence in the between meal snack catching a low and the pre-meal test catching a high.

    When he feels low, why not have him eat a small snack first to see if he "feels better". This will especially work well if it is almost mealtime. Have him eat the snack and wait for mealtime to test.

    Of course, sometimes those out of no where lows pop up. I'd hate to encourage him not to test for lows and miss a big one. That's why I suggested eating a snack.

    Have him do the logging. When he "sees" the big picture, maybe he will regain confidence.
     
  11. hypercarmona

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    As someone who has been labeled "obsessive" by my endo, one thing that I can suggest is regularly scheduled tests. Even if it is every hour of the day for a while, the one check of the hour is the only one until the next hour. You could then go to only checking before and after meals or whatever testing schedule his endo wants you to be on. This method helped me cut back on testing a bit after my last pregnancy. Having a timer or a watch with an alarm helps with this.

    I test a lot, and a normal day is anywhere from 15x-18x. A "bad" day (sick, premenstrual, lots of exercise, etc.) would be much more than that. I've tried CGMS and it didn't work. (It actually didn't work to the point where I just don't see myself ever trying another one.) I can't trust my body to tell me when I'm low, and so I have to rely upon my meter. I'm by myself with my children all day, and have a responsibility to them to do my best to avoid lows. That being said, I use each and every result that I get, so as to keep track of my previous bolus and to watch my daily/weekly trends.

    It might also help to have him write everything down while it's happening. If he tests, then the number goes into a journal, along with the feelings he was having at the time. It could be that if he's feeling sick with "normal" numbers, something else could be going on with his health that needs to be addressed. (It might also help convince him to cut back a little, as writing down BGs 25x a day gets old very fast.)
     
  12. Nightowl

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    Help him tighten his glucose range

    I don't think we should try to second guess what is excessive testing for any person in any particular situation. Based on what my son has told me, it feels terrible when your blood glucose levels are swinging up and down. Your son has probably felt some terrible swings and is afraid of feeling that way again. He probably tests so often and soon after eating so that he can try to catch a rise or fall in the early phase. He sounds like a very bright kid. Obviously you don't want your son to be fearful and feel that he must test hourly. However, in my opinion, denying him the right to test when he wants to will only lead to him feeling more anxious and fearful. If a diabetic feels they need to test I think they should always be allowed to and in fact encouraged to test. I also don't think you should call in a psychiatrist or counselor to try to talk him out of testing so often. This will send him the message that you think something is wrong with him and his decision making. He was only diagnosed three months ago and has felt some terrible glucose swings. This would make anyone feel anxious and fearful. If your son is testing out of range 1/3 of the time then it seems to me that he has a very legitimate fear of going out of range. I would tell your son that you understand that it must be very frightening and that his anxiety is a very normal response. I would then try to strategize with him ways to keep him in range so that he will have more confidence in being able to go longer periods of time between tests. Try to help him figure out what is causing him to go out of range so often. I think tightening his glucose range is the key. Also, it sounds like your son is very sensitive to glucose swings. This is good. Helping him narrow his glucose range will help him keep his sensitivity sharp and will give him more confidence in his ability to keep tighter control. I think this will help him feel more secure and cause him to naturally cut out some of the testing. Testing a lot is good. When my son isn't wearing a CGMS he always tests about 12 times a day. When he is doing sports it can be a lot more.
     
  13. Nancy in VA

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    I do think that amount of testing is excessive. But, from reading previous stories you posted about him, there are other concerns that he and you have about his levels (i.e. going on the stage, having water, etc). I do think that he has some overall anxiety about diabetes and probably needs to talk to somebody about it.
     
  14. Midwestmomma

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    Kinda what I was going from....past posts...and all. But I am no expert, but 25 times and right after meals...seems a little overboard...In my own opinion.
     
  15. StillMamamia

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    Perhaps understand exactly how and when insulin works, would help him have a little peace of mind and cut back on some of the tests (like the right after a meal ones):confused:

    Have you guys discussed all these with your endo? Maybe that would help also.
     
  16. Mom2Boys

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    I agree with the advice of letting him check when he feels it is necessary. I wouldn't second guess him on this right now. It sounds like he's trying to minimize his highs and lows and since this is still so new to him he is checking a lot. I also agree that a CGM may be a great tool for him to try. It may give him the security he needs to feel more comfortable again. I would sit down with him and explain that some highs and lows are a normal part of diabetes and no matter how much he tests he will still experience them from time to time.

    All that being said, we are frequent BG testers too ;)! I get frustrated with BGs because they are just a single blip that doesn't tell me anything about the trend. A 120 is a great number, but it could be rising fast, dropping fast or holding steady. You just don't always know unless you check again in a little while. We average about 15 BGs a day, which a lot of people would consider excessive, but we all have a different way of doing things and that's okay!

    Encourage your son to really look at when and why he's testing at each individual time and maybe that will help him cut back a little. If you find that it is really an obsessive habit that he can't control then maybe look into it further, but I bet he will start testing a little less frequently once he gets more comfortable with managing diabetes.
     
  17. Mom2Kathy

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    I agree with this. This is all still new to you both and I'm sure after a while, he will back off on testing so much. I wouldn't worry too much about it right now.
     
  18. emm142

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    I had problems with this exact thing. I'm now down to around 12-15 per day (from 20-30). For me it was obsessive-compulsive, and I wouldn't have stopped without some help. It might not be the same for your son. It got to the point where I was testing without even going through the "shall I test?" thought process, and over-analysing every number, treating anything below 100. I was terrified of lows, but didn't want to be high either (I corrected down over 180).

    One thing which helped for me was writing out a schedule, with all logical testing times on it. The only times I usually test over 20 times a day now are in illness, stress, or circumstances where being low or high would be especially bad.
     
  19. Amy C.

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    I too agree with Nancy. I think there is a lot of diabetes anxiety at your house that needs to be let out.
     
  20. ADHDiabetic Mom

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    Poor kid. He must feel really anxious.

    First of all, kudos to him for his diligent self-care and "take charge" attitude. He probably needs to swing back a bit in the other direction, but there are positives to be seen here.

    I'm not sure where you live, but the Children's in our area has counselors and psychologists available for D kids for just this kind of thing. I would definitely check into that. :cwds:
     

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