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What is your child's target range?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Shopgirl2091, Aug 27, 2014.

  1. nebby3

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    I'd be hesitant to put a limit in what an acceptable A1c is with kids. I know they now say they want everyone under 7.5 but we found that impossible with a toddler and from what I hear the teen years make it pretty tough too.
     
  2. DavidN

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    100 - day
    150 - exercising
    110 - night
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I think every family is going to have a different point at which the quest for a lower A1c impacts "all quality of life".
     
  4. Lightly Salted

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    100 daytime
    115 nighttime, but I just recently changed that from 140, then 130

    We have a Dexcom, though, and homeschool, so I can be comfortable with running him low. Before Dex, it was 150 at night.
     
  5. jenm999

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    Ack! Didn't mean to sound judgmental. I meant that chasing perfection can backfire. I know we could do better if I, say, quit my job or withdrew my son from activities or never let him have pizza again... but we are doing good enough and he's a happy and healthy kid, and that's what matters. And I have a 7 year old so I have no insight into toddlers or teens with T1!
     
  6. DavidN

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    I would take it a step further, and I suspect I'm in the minority with this one, but a peeve of mine is parents who broadcast their child's A1C. If its germane or gives context to the topic being discussed ... great, I suspect that info in feedback form is greatly appreciated. But often times it's completely out of context and comes off as a bit too much swagger for my taste (cause rarely is it a "high" number). Many smart and seasoned T1D parents have correctly pointed out that A1C's are affected by lifestyles, body chemistry, child personality, age, etc ... all sorts of stuff. To broadcast it, particularly when so many are trying their damnedest and still struggling, is a tad annoying. IMO.
     
  7. jenm999

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    I completely agree! I should have said "doing their best" or something less incendiary.
     
  8. Megnyc

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    I don't think you are in the minority at all. I generally have no issue with the parent posting their kids A1C if it is relevant to the discussion. But there is no reason in my opinion to have your child's A1C in your signature or to mention it when it doesn't add anything to the discussion.
     
  9. missmakaliasmomma

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    I thought when it was acceptable for children to be under 8.5, that that was wayyy too high of an a1c to aim for. My daughter has had no issue being under 7.5 for as long as I can remember- shots, pump, dex... were still all under 7.5. We came close at 7.3 once but it's pretty doable IMO

    However, I am NOT expecting to see this when the onset of puberty starts. Enjoying the 6.9 now while I can ( just did a1c today)

    What does a 7.5 correlate to in terms of avg BG?
     
  10. jenm999

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  11. nebby3

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    I'd be hesitant to say what's doable for others. Even at the same age with the same technology it seems like some kids' bgs are just harder to manage. One of the most encouraging things I ever heard was when our retiring CDE told me my dd was a tough one (implying that some parents of D kids have it easier than others). I'm not sure would have said it if she weren't leaving but it actually really helped because it made me feel like I had been doing a good job even though the #s didn't always show it.
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    No, what I meant was that for some families striving for a 6.5 could be achievable without too much strain - highly cooperative kid, maybe a light eater or not a big carb eater etc and for some even trying to achieve a 7.5 would present a challenge to their "quality of life". I'm just saying that it's highly subjective.
     
  13. missmakaliasmomma

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  14. Ali

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    This, plus kids and adults have different activity levels that influence numbers, plus add in different digestive systems and different metabolism a. A big factor as kids get older and all the way through ones life are each persons unique hormonal patterns. Hormones have a huge impact on glucose control, in both men and women. Just a few more thoughts:smile:ali
     
  15. swellman

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    Right now the only thing I have to go on is target A1c. Sure, deviation is out there but not nearly as defined as A1c. So, if you ask me what my target is I will tell you what it is but the reasons for my "targets" are entirely based on 1) safety and 2) A1c. Personally, I think asking for other people's targets without asking for ALL the other reasons for these targets is futile. No one is going to say "My target is 100 but we almost lost our child." or "Our target is 150 but we were just diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy." So, really, what's the point?

    Personally, I would weigh the advice of a parent with a CWD with a posted A1c of 7 a little different than a poster with an A1c of 10. That's just me. I don't see it as swagger. I will go on to say that I would also be very critical of the quality of life balance involved. That is to say, I would carefully examine the advice of a "strict paleo" A1c of 6. It's a balance, but to classify an A1c mention as swagger seems to be a tad defensive. IMO.
     
  16. DavidN

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    Your entire post supports my point, except for your 7 vs 10 strawman thingy. A simple A1C tells a fraction of the story. Also, find me a parent who is posting advice with an A1C of 10 in their signature.
     
  17. Mimikins

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    I am an adult, so my goals might be a little different.

    My diabetes team wants an A1C below 7, but, due to a strong genetic predisposition to neuropathy, I have personal goals to have an A1C below 6 (non-diabetic levels). This typically means fasting BG below 110 and post-meal spikes below 145, though my pump's target BG is set to 120 for most of the day to prevent severe hypos if my insulin works a bit too well or if I am a bit more active than usual.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2014
  18. wilf

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    Our target A1C is anything under 7. To get there we aim for blood sugars between 60 and 140.
     
  19. mwstock

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    I believe your current blood glucose range for 140 +/- 20 points is reasonable, given that you have a five year old. Tight control is defined by ADA (American Diabetes Association) to be 70-130, or 180 two hours after eating. Tight control is not recommended for children. The lows can deprive the glucose needed for brain development. They recently updated the goal for the A1C to 7.5 or under.
    http://www.diabetes.org/living-with...d-glucose-control/tight-diabetes-control.html
    The Medtronic pump uses the carb ratio, target glucose numbers, insulin duration and sensitivity factor settings to make corrections to the blood sugar. If the blood sugar is too low, it will correct up to the first number and if higher will correct down to the second number. Yes, I have made adjustments to these settings on the pump. I highly value the feedback from our team and doctor. I believe your child will be fine in the long run if you follow the general guidelines.
     
  20. KHS22

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    Our target is 5.5 (believe that is around 100). We found that difficult to do on shots - and ended up a bit higher - our A1C was 7.4 then, which means average sugar around 160/9.5. She was only on 1/2 unit of levemir - and I feel like half the time that just leaked back out, and diluted insulin, which was persnickety in my opinion!

    Since pumping and dexcom-ing we are aiming for the same target, but I think its a bit 'easier' to achieve. I say easier because its more possible, but still, tons of work! Our last A1C was 6.6, which means average 7.5 or 140 I believe. However, without the dexcom I'm not sure I'd feel comfortable having her, for example, ride in the 4's and 5's at night like she does now. Nor could we fine tune the basals for accuracy since she is on such little amounts of insulin.


    So, I guess my answer is it depends! My endo says for a toddler, the goal is still less than 8. Obviously he'd like it to be a bit lower, but that is the guidelines... David N - hope you don't think I'm 'broadcasting" - just trying to put context to my thoughts on what is reasonable and achievable!
     

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