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What is the secret to your success?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by joy orz, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. coni

    coni Approved members

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    If by success you mean a consistent a1c below 7.5, we are not successful. Lol. Just as we are all physically different on the outside, we are different on the inside. In my opinion, there is no one route to "success". You know, YDMV.

    For us, consistently using a technique, e.g. pre-bolusing for meals, results in a reduction of a maximum a1c reduction of .5. However, adding another technique does not reduce the a1c by another .5. It just doesn't work that way for us. There seems to be a floor but no ceiling. In other words, diligence can reduce DD's a1c only so much, but slacking off definitely shows up quickly with an increased a1c (almost a 1.0 increase the one time we had a rocky time related to diabetes management issues).

    Since you're one this forum, I'm pretty sure you know the secrets to success. Diabetes is what it is. There's an a1c/diabetes management/life balance to be met, in my opinion. I may be in the minority here, but I value the life balance part a lot and don't do some things that may reduce DD's a1c. She's consistently around 7.5 with common sense, consistent management. No pre-bolusing, no CGM.
     
  2. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

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    Here, here!

    You really are doing a great job. The only thing I'd consider changing is the nurses approach to what she considers low. The Dex should be her best asset in this situation, she can just look and see the trend.

    Please don't let this take over and control you. You are doing a great job controlling it and even though, right now it may not be where you want it to be, her A1c really is acceptable for her age range.
     
  3. DsMom

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    It is hard when you come here and see those posters with CWD with A1cs always in the low 6s and BGs that are "always in range." It makes me wonder what I could be doing better too. But, it is not unlike what we parents may feel when we look at a child with better grades than ours, better athletic skills, more artistic, etc. You have to be careful to downplay those competitive feelings and focus on the needs and happiness of your own child. I do agree that it sounds like you are doing great and your child is happy and well adjusted...the definition of success for all of us.:) Unless the endo is particularly concerned or you see the A1c creeping up unchecked...I would try to stop trying to find the magic answer and keep doing what you are doing...which sounds like a wonderful and conscientious job!

    Personally, I feel I am doing the best job when we can make D recede into the background as much as possible and my son is happy and unconcerned. I do of course like to see a good A1c...but that is part of a much larger picture when it comes to D.:cwds:
     
  4. joy orz

    joy orz Approved members

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    Thanks guys! I do like the A1c to recede. We aren't pre-bolusing with as much lead time as we used to, mainly because her toddler brother always wants to eat, and she doesn't want to wait 20 minutes to have her snack too. :rolleyes: Go figure. For main meals, we pre-dose, but snacks on the beach or playground sort of come as soon as captain chaos digs into the diaper bag and pulls out a snack bar for two. :p

    I think the Dex is almost working against us at school. We have to work on this. If she had a breakfast spike, and then is dropping fast from the spike, the nurse and teacher get buggy as soon as she hits 120 with a down arrow. If she didn't have the Dex, everyone would be happy with a 120, but those arrows make them all nervous, so there have been many times that she got a marshmallow right before lunch. We're meeting in August, so we can talk about that. This next year, her classroom is the room next door. Yippee, so we are going to be able to be a bit more conservative.

    I know I'm beating myself up, and yes big picture, she's great, but I still like to hear tips. You never know, even all this time, if there is something I'm missing. Maybe we'll just take a breath though and be happy to have a healthy, growing and strong kid. (I just want to keep her that way for a long time.)
     
  5. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

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    Which is why I never click on a thread about an A1c unless it's a CWD asking for assistance with a problem with one. It's like kids comparing report cards.

    I think that is the key. Have D lurking in the background. You are aware of it, you take care of it, but it's not always number 1. Your child is.
     
  6. steph

    steph Approved members

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    I think everyone's body is different. I am sure there are siblings with T1D who have parents that provide them the same level of care yet have different A1Cs. While I do look to this site to give me ideas of how to better manage my daughter's bg, I also have to be realistic, fight back those perfectionistic thoughts, and tell myself it's ok to be good enough. I try to base my "good enough" assessment on her day to day health and happiness rather than the A1C. Numbers mostly in range and an energetic toddler equals good enough. Pizza spikes of over 400 and lows making her feel bad means I need to do something different.
    At our 3mos post dx checkup her A1C was 6.9. But she was honeymooning and had a few very scary lows. Her 6mos post dx A1C was 7.6. Yes it went up, but she has not had the hypos, and I am not as stressed out about micro managing every little thing in her day. I'm happy with that.
     

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