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What is ISIG????

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by LJS118, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. LJS118

    LJS118 Approved members

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    :confused: Ryan has been on the MM real time sensor for a little over a week now. I saw someone mention on another thread about looking at the ISIG...I was wondering if somebody could explain to me what that is? Thanks a bunch in advance
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    If you use the ESC arrow to look at the sensor status screen (the one that tells you the age of the sensor), you will see a line that says "ISIG" and then a number. What that number is is the "raw" number that the sensor reports to the receiver. When you calibrate, the formula in the receiver converts that raw number to a BG reading. So say the ISIG is 15.45 and you tell it in a calibration that BG is 150. It then knows that when it gets an ISIG reading of 15.45, it is equal to a 150 BG. Your calibration factor is roughly 10. (10 x ISIG = BG)

    Once the sensor is established, your calibration factor says roughly the same over the life of that sensor. If you look at ISIG alone, you can multiply it by your calibration factor and arrive at BG pretty closely.

    All that being said, we use ISIG in a couple of situations. If it comes time to calibrate and it's a bad time - BG moving fast, or he just ate, or he's really high or low, I definitely don't want to go ahead and cal. So I lose readings until I can do so. Bummer, right? Well, if you know your calibration factor, you can still get a pretty good idea of what BG is by looking at that and multiplying by your cal factor.

    The other way we use ISIG is to tell during a 2 hour warm up whether it's a good time to cal. I look at ISIG and then look at it 10 minutes later. If it's pretty steady, I know BG is pretty steady and I calibrate.

    The final way we use ISIG is to tell when a sensor is dying. Once ISIG drops really low, or your calibration factor changes significantly, chances are, your sensor is done.

    So that's kind of ISIG in a nutshell. :)
     
  3. jules12

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    Great Explanation of ISIG!!! We find it very useful too.
     
  4. Darryl

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  5. Jilleighn

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    Also at time for calibration you can figure out what is the highest and lowest blood sugar you can put in. for instance if you ISIG is 10. to find out the lowest BS you can put in you X by 5, so the lowest blood sugar you can put in is 50. To find the highest blood sugar you can put in you X by 20. so the highest Blood sugar you can put in is 200.
     
  6. LJS118

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    :) Thanks for all your help. It sounds kind of confusing right now (since Ryan is at school and I can't see his pump) but when he gets home I'll try and figure this out. I think I understand for the most part.
    Darryl--I read that you wait 2 hours to hook up the transmitter to the site, am I correct? Our trainer said to wait 10 minutes for it to get wet, why do you wait 2 hours? I'm just trying to understand why.
    Thanks so much for your help...I'm a newbie at this CGM thing.
     
  7. LJS118

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    What are typically normal ISIG numbers??? What are your kids'???
     
  8. hawkeyegirl

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    Well, it depends, but I've seen ISIGs on a normally operating sensor that are anywhere from 6-52. The majority of the time they're more in the 9-25 range. A very low ISIG usually means that a sensor is dying.
     
  9. LJS118

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    Thanks for all the help. I just changed his sensor, waiting to hook up the transmitter, and now I'm going to follow all the suggestions and hopefully get some good calibrations in there. Wish me luck!
     
  10. LJS118

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    Did I do this Right??????

    Okay...so this morning his ISIG was 19.75
    His actual blood sugar was 124
    The sensor said his glucose level was 117
    So according to the formula you guys gave me, from now on I just need to multiply each ISIG by 6 and I should get the actual blood sugar...IS THIS RIGHT???? :confused:
     
  11. hawkeyegirl

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    Generally speaking, yes. The relationship between ISIG and BG isn't a straight-line formula (I believe you'll see more variation at the extreme low and high BGs), but for your purposes, it should be close enough.
     

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