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What do you guys think about "teen rebellion"?

Discussion in 'Teens' started by Hollyb, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Hollyb

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    Hi there, hope you don't mind me visiting the teen forum? I just wanted your opinion about something.

    Aaron had his eye checkup today, and the doctor asked him, "So, have you had your teen rebellion yet about your blood sugars?" Aaron said no, and I guess the guy basically told him that EVERYONE does, kind of implying, "you will too."

    So what do you think? I know some kids burn out and give up for a while -- but do you think every teen does? And would you even call that rebellion? And is this not kind of a discouraging thing thing to say?
     
  2. Diet Dr. Pepper

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    I kind of went through that when I was about 15.. I wouldn't check my sugars at all, didn't take any insulin, and ate everything and anything I wanted.. it only lasted about a month with me, because by then I was sick of feeling.. well, sick! I had really bad headaches all of the time, and had no energy at all... ever since I've been a lot better though. I got over it. I don't know if every teen does it though..

    For me it wasn't about teenage rebellion or anything like that. I was just sick and tired of having D and having to deal with it. I wanted to be normal, you know? I quickely figured out that the only way I was ever going to be able to feel normal was if I took care of myself. Otherwise I wouldn't be able to do anything that 'normal' teens did...

    I'm sorry, I probably didn't help at all.. I'm not very good at explaining things...
     
  3. karpoozi123

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    I went through it, and I think all of my friends that have diabetes did too. I am disturbed that the doctor talked about it like that. He could have been proactive, and tried to help prevent it, but he rather legitimized it, made it seem ok. I did go through the preiod of not checking and not caring about diabetes at all, but I think that with the right attitude it CAN be prevented, or at least minimized.

    BTW, we are THRILLED to have you here. We hang out in the parents forums all the time... ;)
     
  4. malyssa

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    I think that we all go through a period when we get over-loaded with everything, and we kind of put diabetes as our last priority...but I wouldn't call it a rebellion.
    I have been going through it in the last few months...my blood sugar was constantly 300-400, and I just couldn't be bothered because I was too busy with college things, and schoolwork and the such. It's not that I didn't care, I was just stressed out about getting in college applications, college essays, and visiting schools, and diabetes was just getting in my way, so I just tried to forget about it. Well, when I saw what it had done to my A1c, I stopped putting it off, and I began taking control again, and I asked for help. I don't think that everyone goes through a rebellion, but that they just get burnt-out and kind of try and forget it. If I were a parent to a child with diabetes, I would ask him/her if they would like me to take over a part of their D care if I saw the signs of a burn-out/ "rebellion" comming on, because teens are stubborn, and we won't always ask for help. I did ask for help, but most of us won't. You can offer to log bg readings, or change pump sites, list carb amounts on food...things like that. I think that would be a great help if that were to happen to your son.

    I don't think it was the right thing to say to a teen...I mean, I would get upset if someone said that to me.
    Sorry for rambling on forever. :eek: But, I hope I helped, even just a little...and, I love it when parents visit the teens forums. I always feel like I can get things out in words better than I can say them sometimes, and it's nice to know that the parents care what we think! :)
     
  5. kierbabi09

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    Yup, I think that everone goes through it, although not to the same extent. There was a time when I thought that if I didn't check my sugars than the number wouldn't be there. I thought it was MY fault that my sugars were high (this was before I was on insulin) so I didn't check very often because I didn't want to see the number. I don't know if that makes sense, but that's how it was for me.
    I got a lot better at checking and I now check when I;m supposed to:)
     
  6. LadyBug

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    i've never rebelled(i'll be 15 in two weeks), other than when i was a newbie and would lock myself in my room a refuse to take my shot(mom always won). i don't think all kids/teens have to have a rebellion. i think that the parents make a very big difference whether a kid/teen rebels. my mom is very involved in my care, carries the med kit for me when we're together and she's never pushed me to do anything for myself that i'm uncomfortable with. i've never put a set in myself, i know how, i can set it up and if we had a emergency i could do it, but until i'm ready, mom puts it in for me. she gets up to check me most nights when i need it done, analyzes my BS and fixes my IC's and basals. when we where in the hospital mom promised that we would do this together and we have. i take care of myself really well and she helps me. i know some day, soon(i'm aiming for doing it on my own by/during my senior year of HS), i'll have to shoulder the responsibility for all of it, but in the mean time i'm getting to be a 'kid' a bit longer, a little less to worry about. and that really helps me not want to rebel, not having to shoulder all the responsibility for my care just yet(plus mom would know so soon, it wouldn't even be funny. that's where her involvement helps her and my doctors and stuff, because i know there's no way i can do it with out being found out so fast it wouldn't be worth it.).
    all that being said, i can take care of myself with out her, six months into my pumping, 2 1/2 years after i was diagnosed my little sister was in the hospital for 4 days and i took care if myself while my grandmother watched and worried(mom had her cell on her at all times, though if she was ever unavailable i'm totally at ease calling my endo and educators for help):)

    ok, that's my extremely looong two cents:cwds:
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2008
  7. Hollyb

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    Thanks so much, all of you. I'm impressed at the insight you've all expressed. And to those who said they weren't good at explaining it: not true! It all makes a lot of sense.
     
  8. NoName

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    I honestly don't think that teenagers would do that as "rebellion". Sure, of course after so many years of D, they will get tired of it, and eventually just start.. slacking off I guess you would say. Now, while all D teenagers do not do that, Some do. It depends on the teenager. Because, honestly, it is a lot for us kids/teenagers to handle. We need encouragement at times, we need to know that people believe that we can do it, that we can actually take care of ourselves on our own. So it's up to the parent to give the kid space. If their blood sugar is high, then instead of fighting about it, or saying it's a "bad" number, figure out the solution. Is it worth fighting over? Is it worth getting mad or upset over? Do you get upset when your paycheck is over 600? How about when your credit score is high? Granted, this is your kids life that we are talking about, but don't fight about it, FIX it. Encourage them to fix it. I'm sure, that if I were encouraged to take care of it, if my dad actually understood, that I would take better care of it now. But honestly, I don't. So I know I'm not really one to speak. But I think that is what causes most teenage "rebellion" against D. And no, not all teens go through that. Absolutely not.
     
  9. Volleyball_Chick_15

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    I think diabetics go through a stage where they slack off on testing and taking care of them selfs.... now would i call it rebellion?? No i wouldn't i would call it stage that Some diabetics go through...
     
  10. Daxdog

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    I have not, as I have only had diabetes for less than a year, I do not think ALL teens will. I would not call it a rebellion. Besides, what does that doctor think HE knows about that subject? Does he have diabetes? Had he taken a poll of how many teens with diabetes have "rebelled"? I also think stereotyping it as a "teen" rebellion isn't fair. I think adults do it too. Teens aren't the only people who get sick of D and give up (if even for a little while).
     
  11. s0ccerfreak

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    I would tend to call it burnout over rebellion. I think that at some point and to some extent everyone goes through it. I think it helps to have a network of d friends, a place you know you can go to for support (such as cwd), and being reminded that mom and dad are there for you if you need them. Sometines tough love is necessary and the parents need to take over.

    I got d when I was 7 and was fine with it then, but after time I got kinda sick of it. When I was 12-13, I had a rough time dealing with not wanting to test or have to figure out carbs, but I still tested (not as often as I should've) and took my insulin (maybe not the right dose). It was maybe 6 months and my a1c was 8.7- after my endo threatened to take my pump away (not that my mom would've let him), I managed to get back on track- which takes courage and hard work. I've been pumping for 7 years and don't think I would ever want to go back to shots. I don't even want to think about what I would've done if I was having to take shots during that time when i was really struggling. Now I am 17, doing everything on my own and know that it just isn't an option to ignore testing or carbs. I do all my logging, site changes, prescriptions, ICF ISF and basal changes, carb counting, but I know my parents are there if I need them (and cwd is always here)
    <3 Rae
     
  12. Hollyb

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    I agree with all of you! It does happen to adults too -- they get overloaded, discouraged, busy, depressed... and drop the ball for a while. Nobody calls that rebellion.
     
  13. Mody_Jess_Pony

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    I think we all go through a time where we seriously think we've had enough crap throwin at us and theres usually more than one factor stuck in there other than D. Sometimes it's something we want to do and we think our parents or the reason preventing us from doing it is Diabetes. I don't think everyone goes through a rebellion.
    I have my good days and bad days but not enough energy to not do what I need to do.
     
  14. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    I was already an older teen when I was diagnosed but I don't think I would have rebelled in terms of skipping shots because I went through about a month of DKA is my guess and it was horrible.

    But I think if I'd been younger I would have been even more insistant than I have been that my blood sugars are none of my parents' business and they can just butt out. And they would have accepted that less. As a younger teen, I did not engage in partying, drinking, sex, or any of that stuff, but I still went through a period (which I'm not entirely out of) where I didn't want my parents to know about anything I didn't choose to share with them. With diabetes, I don't feel that my parents have any more right than anybody else to know what my blood sugar is. They're not giving me my shots, calculating my doses, etc- so business of theirs are the results?

    I think I would have also resented even more my parents' unwillingness to learn how to take care of me and to learn basic things about blood sugar management.
     
  15. _brittanyy_

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    i wouldn't actually call it "rebellion." i, myself, think of it as getting fed up with it, wondering how you would be without insulin. i went through that stage not too long ago, right after i changed insulins, about 4-5 months ago. i would eat secretly without checking or correcting, or if i did eat secretly, i'd give myself a shot without the correction. i also would tell my mom my sugars were perfect, when they would be the opposite. i dont really know why i did it...i just got fed up with it all. because i felt like my mom would blame me for my highs, and get mad at me because of it, so i wouldnt tell her my real sugar, to keep us from gettin angry with each other. and the eating, i only did that because my dr. suggested i lose about 10 lbs, even tho i'm the perfect size for my body height. so, i'd eat healthy with mom & daddy, then eat what i wanted, what they wouldnt let me have. then, one day, i realized what i was doing to my body. i realized that i dont wanna grow up, and be blind by im 40. or have a leg or two amputated. i wanted to be like a normal, healthy adult. so when my mom found out i was "cheating" again, she told my dr. he told her to talk to me in a normal tone, blah blah, you know lol. so, we sat down that night. it was my daddy, her, and me. and they gave me the same lecture as normal, the one i got about 2x a week maybe. and right then, at that moment when i seen the look in my moms eyes about me needing to be healthy, i changed my mind. i told her i wouldnt cheat anymore. i would do what i was supposed to do. i wouldnt tell her false sugars. and since then, i havent. my a1c from the old insulin was 8 something. my dr. wanted me to be atleast 6.5. i'm at 6.0 since then. :) extreme improvement. i'm doin much better now, and i can tell my mom's a completely different person. in a way, i think it made us stronger, as a mom and daughter. showing us that we can accomplish anything together. i'm very greatful for her. she stuck with me throughout the whole journey of this. and now, on avg., my sugars run from 70-140. thanks to her :) so yea, i wouldnt call it rebellion. just, getting fed up with it. :) hope i was a help! sorry i typed so much lol d:
     
  16. BobbyJackElmo

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    I dont think that every teen has or will go through that stage. I've not once just slacked off for a long time. Sure maybe a few hours but thats nothing compared to like diabulimia or something. And after 8 years I dont think I will. I have a friend at school (that went to fletcher before lol) that hasnt had D for a long time but she gave up and went through the diabulimia thing but they will (hopefully) grow out of that stage.​
     
  17. rachabetic

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    I don't think that all teens will go through a rebellion or burnout stage. Although many that I know have gone through it (like my friend who just got back and A1C of 11.4:eek:). I deffinately did go through something. I am not really sure if I was rebellious or just in burnout. For me it lasted a really long time. I would say from when I was about 12/13 to this past year when I was 16 with times on and off that I would do well. I just really wouldn't check at all, and I would somethimes bolus for the food I ate. I think I really wanted to be in control of checking my bg and diabetes in general. So when my parents would tell me to check, I just wouldn't. Or I would say that I did, but I didn't. But then I would check on my own time when no one was telling me to (not very often). There were a few things that helped me get over this. The first was tennis. I play horribly when my bg is high, so I kept it in range for that. But that only usually lasted for tennis season. The second is that I got a lot more involved in my diabetes camp. It really helped to have so many friends who all had diabetes. When my friend or I am having a hard time with our numbers, we text eachother all of our numbers as we get them, to remind the other one to check and to be a support team for one another. The third thing would deffinately have to be CWD. After I came here, it is really when the changes started to stick. I have now been really well through the end of school, summer/camp, tennis season...and I'm still going strong!

    Oh...one morething I have to say. If your teen is in "rebellion" scaring them is not the answer. I had my endo telling me what can happen if I don't take care of my bg, or telling me that if I didn't start bringing my A1C down, he was going to kick my out of his practice to make room for kids who actually care. But none of that did anything to encourage me.
     
  18. Hollyb

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    Thanks again to all of you who answered and shared your own experiences.

    And daxdog, I'm with you. I don't think an EYE doctor should take it upon himself to "counsel" a kid about his diabetes!
     

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