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what do you do?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Brookiesworld, Jan 10, 2011.

  1. Brookiesworld

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    Question for you- What do you do when your child doesnt want to check her sugar, and she even cries about it and when i ask her why, she just says " thats all i do is stick my finger all day long i dont care about it" stumbled looking for some advice, thanks
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    How old? and how long D ?
     
  3. kiwikid

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    cuddles and sympathy and do it for her... :cwds:
     
  4. frizzyrazzy

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    is she checking and complaining or is she complaining when you check?

    If it's the former, then she's telling you that she's got too much responsibility. Check for her. If its the latter, you need to just be matter of fact about it -"moms going to check now." She's young right? and only diagnosed since June? So make sure you're not making her do more than she's ready for. If she feels like it's all she does, then she's telling you that it's too much. :)
     
  5. Brookiesworld

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    yeah she is 7 and was diagnosed 7 months ago. we both check it and at school she is checked often. this is how i handled it; i went ahead and let her have supper without checking and i was only able to give her a shot for the carb intake but i told her she would have to be checked in a few hours so we could see what was going on. i dont know if this was right or not but I felt like she needed to be able to make a decision and i let her, i dont know.......
     
  6. frizzyrazzy

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    If your decision was to allow her to make the choice then yes, you handled it the only way you could. Dose for carbs eaten only. But that said, she has a lifetime of checking ahead of her and checking BG is the ONLY good way we have right now (other than CGM) to judge her BG. It's certainly not a habit I'd want to get into. She's 7. Would you allow her to make decisions regarding other medical issues in her life?
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    It's not a, "right" or "wrong" thing really. :cwds: Bg checks are just a vital part of living with D. Long term it's not wise to bolus for meals without getting a pre-meal bg first, but now and again it's not a terrible thing.

    We all manage in whatever way we think will work for our child. Some reward, some let kids use alternate sites, some use a cgm to cut down on the number of finger sticks.

    I guess the best advice I can offer is to be understanding but not dwell too much on what a hardship bg testing is. Fact is, they have to do it, and if we play into the notion that it's awful ... well, they will see it as awful. I know that's harsh ... but I do believe that it's true.:cwds: To quote Joe S., "You don't have to like it, you just have to do it."

    Good luck!
     
  8. obtainedmist

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    From a safety standpoint, I wouldn't want to dose for any carbs without knowing what the bg was because of the chance of going low if she was low to begin with or on the low side.

    I would try some positive reinforcement...maybe a chart where if she accumulates and certain number of bg tests, she gets to choose do do a certain activity that she enjoys with you or friends. We used to do this with our kids to reward them for certain things. I don't know if it seems old fashioned now...but it might be worth a try.
     
  9. hawkeyegirl

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    For me, checking before giving insulin is non-negotiable. (I do sometimes use the CGM for that purpose, but I don't know if you have one or not.) Also, my son is one who if I let him know it's an option NOT to check, he's going to try to push that as far as he can.

    In your situation, I probably would have sympathized, and then done the check for her. And I'd try not to make a bigger deal out of it than brushing teeth or combing hair. It's just one of those things that they have to do. (Well, actually, it's just one of those things that I have to do. My son is almost 7 and does none of his own checks. It sounds like your daughter may need you to take them over for a while.)
     
  10. Tuff

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    Your daughter is very young. I tend to go by the signs my child shows me to know when he is ready for more responsibility. She is telling you that she is not interested in doing her pokes. That is absolutely fine as long as you do them happily for her. I woud do my child's while he was busy playing or watching tv. It was never up to him until several years after diagnosis. Even now if he is tired I go ahead and poke him. I want to avoid diabetes burnout in the teen years at all costs. Let her be a child while you worry about taking care of her diabetes. You'll know when it is time to gradually change things.
     
  11. Pauji5

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    Kendall was 7 when she was diagnosed (she's 10 n0w). From day one, we've been very no nonsense about finger sticks. She complains (much less now) and I was always said, "Kendall, I'm sorry this is what you need to do everyday, and I'll be glad to do it for you, but it's happening."

    She almost always does it herself except in the middle of the night. I know it's hard to hear your child complain when you yourself feel the same way, but be strong. I still go in the bedroom to hide and cry sometimes, but never in front of them...good luck!!
     
  12. Mom of 3 BOYS

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    the hardest part of diabetes is when our children feel sad about things we can not change... rolly was 5 when he was dx and i remember that on our first vacation he said to me "but we still have to chk my sugar?" :( i cryed so much... since then we have our moments and even though now he is 7 and has been getting poked for 2 years he has days that he says he doesn't want to chk his sugar and why does he always need to chk his sugar...

    i hold him, give him a big hug and tell him that i am sorry that he gets tired of checking his sugar but that is what helps us keep him healthy and strong. I love him so much and i will do it for him.. usually that works and the days that it doesn't work i bribe him by telling him that if he chks i will give him a dollar ;)
     
  13. StillMamamia

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    Maybe praise everytime she checks herself, like "Good job. Thank you."? And just say "No problem." when she wants you to check.

    I'm sorry.
     
  14. swimmom

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    I feel like crying with you. It is hard and she is very little. This makes me remember that a couple of months after Lauren was diagnosed, I realized that I was almost avoiding touching her because it seemed like every time I touched her it was to poke her with something sharp. I really had to be conscious of taking time to tickle her or scratch her back - anything really that wasn't connected to diabetes!

    BTW - have you tried various types of lancets? May not be the issue at all for you. We did try out several and Lauren had a definite preference. I think it also gave her a modicum of control to experiment and choose her own poker.
     
  15. Beach bum

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    Testing is hands down non-negotiable in our home.

    However, being young and fairly newly diagnosed, I would have sympathized, cuddled and done the testing for her. Let her know that you agree, testing really stinks, but it's a fact of life, it has to be done. Offer to do the testing for her to lessen the responsibility for her. Praise her for testing, if she doesn't want to check, do it for her.

    My daughter was diagnosed when she was 4, so she doesn't remember anything else. We did have moments like this and I would let her test her stuffies after we tested her.
     
  16. C6H12O6

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    This might be a stupid suggestion but maybe offer to poke a toe instead in these situations.
     

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