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What are your kids eating for breakfast?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by JamieTheTiger, Jun 8, 2016.

  1. JamieTheTiger

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    I'm running out of ideas. My daughter is 11, and it seems like no matter what we do for breakfast, if there is any carbs at all, she spikes. It's maddening! I try to make sure it's protein heavy - and often make some eggs and turkey sausage. This morning I think she did have toast, but I know she had eggs and sausage. I'm running out of thigns to make, as she gets tired of scrambled eggs :)
     
  2. dpr

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    Try this toast. Before the bread goes in the toaster 1 table spoon of olive oil brushed all over. Toast it and comes out nice and golden brown, then spread some butter for flavor. The fat really slows down the absorption. It works really well for us. If she eats it first it can also slow down other high carb foods like bananas etc. Try it by itself first and see how it works out.
     
  3. JamieTheTiger

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    I will try that, thanks!
     
  4. Sprocket

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    Good topic. I am running out of ideas too. My 14 year old is a very picky breakfast eater and can't face an egg or anything heavy on school days. Everything she likes has a significant amount of carbs - eg. cereal, smoothies, etc. Even pre-bolusing by 45 min to an hour doesn't seem to have any effect.
     
  5. JamieTheTiger

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    My kiddos like smoothies, too, but I keep them packed with a lot of spinach. Helps give bulk and nutrition and the fruit covers the spinach taste.
     
  6. Mimikins

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    I've been eating Greek yogurt/cottage cheese and peanut butter for the past year or so. The macros closely match when my insulin starts working, so I only need to prebolus by 15-20 minutes (the time it takes for me to drink a cup of coffee) versus a 30-45+ minute prebolus that I would otherwise need. So far, my current breakfast is along the lines of:
    -200-250g nonfat Greek yogurt/1% cottage cheese
    -17g peanut butter (has to be chunky)
    -6g PB2 (powdered peanut butter -it makes the yogurt/cottage cheese extra peanut-buttery)
    -10g chia seeds (I like to prepare my breakfast the night before, as the chia seeds will soak up the extra liquid and make the entire mixture like a really thick pudding. I also like making chia seed pudding with unsweetened almond milk and cocoa/protein powder for a low-carb treat)
    -100-200g apple as a side

    Depending on how big the apple is, my breakfast is around 400-430kcal and 28-32g net carbs (8-10g fiber).
     
  7. Butterfly Betty

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    My daughter doesn't like to eat breakfast, but since she has athletics first period (when school is in session) she has to have something. So, we get her breakfast shakes. She likes the carnations with extra protein.
     
  8. barbiduleny

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    Smoothies work great for us! Typically ingredient list:
    - blueberries
    - strawberries
    - banana
    - avocado (fat slows it all down)
    - lotsa Peanut butter
    - Protein powder

    On good days we barely see a spike!
     
  9. Cheetah-cub

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    Bagel with cream cheese has always been gentle to my daughter's BG. It is the only breakfast we found to not cause her BG to shoot high in the mornings. Too bad she won't eat that everyday.
     
  10. Christopher

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    When people say this I often wonder if they REALLY have tried everything. I am not insinuating you haven't, you may have. But it just makes me wonder. So does she spike right away or later in the morning. Depending on your answer you should try different techniques. Have you tried pre-bolusing earlier? Then earlier than that. Then even earlier than THAT? You should keep going earlier and earlier until you see a change.
    Have you tried changing her morning ratio to increase the insulin? Then increasing it more? Then even MORE? You should keep increasing more and more until you see a change.

    My point is sometimes people try one thing, like pre-bolusing 10 minutes earlier and if that doesn't work they say, "oh well, I tried pre-bolusing earlier and it didn't work".

    You have been at this for 8 years. Is this a new phenomena or has this been going on for a long time? Maybe it is not the food but changes in her body? Have you tried not having her eat breakfast one morning just to see what her body "normally" does? Have you talked to her Endo about it?

    I am just trying to give you some other things to try and think about. If you have already tried and thought about all of them, please disregard. :)

    Good Luck!!
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
  11. glko

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    We also try to avoid more than 20g carb at breakfast. Lots of eggs and cheese, breakfast meats. We also do a smoothie we call "Chunky Monkey" which is almond milk, 1/2 frozen banana, 1 scoop chocolate protein powder, and scoop of peanut butter. The high protein and fat in the PB seems to help avoid the spikes. If we are going to add bread we use the Bagel Thins, which are much lower carb than a normal bagel, and make an egg/cheese bagel sandwich. I also will make "Breakfast cupcakes" and put Wonton wrappers in a cupcake tin, filled with eggs/meat/veggies and baked in the oven. We are always looking for low carb breakfast options so thanks for the discussion!
     
  12. Beach bum

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    Two teenagers and they are in the grab and go phase. My daughters complains about spikes and drops, and I reiterate that she needs to pre-bolus and strive for a balance.

    Some days they do it, other days they don't.
     
  13. dpr

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    These are some good points if you haven't already tried them. The other thing is, we used to have spikes in the 220's to 280's every morning but they came down into range fine. We've always been able to manage A1C's in the low to mid 6's even with the spikes. I definitely understand the desire to get a handle on the spikes if you can, but if her body just won't cooperate I wouldn't worry too much. Also I found that if our basals weren't right the spikes were a lot worse. Just something else to take a look at.
     
  14. samson

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    Cheetah-cub, How do you bolus for that bagel and cream cheese? Everything straight up front or a combo/extended?
     
  15. Cheetah-cub

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    Everything straight up front. (Unless she woke up already high).

    My daughter has celiac, and we love Canyon Bakehouse Gluten Free Everything bagel. They are delicious. My non-celiac 15 year-old also loves it. They often split a bagel in the mornings.

    So, my daughter typically eat half a bagel loaded with cream cheese. It does not spike her BG at all. She usually pre-bolus for her breakfast meals by about 20 minutes. But we found that when she pre-bolus for the bagel, she can actually go low first. So, we stopped pre-bolusing for her bagel breakfast.

    The bagel worked well for us. She rarely peak 150 (unless she started high), and her BG tend to stay stable throughout the morning. With cereal, (even with protein and pre-bolus), she often double arrows up into the high 200's, and then crash low before lunch.

    I wish she would just eat bagel every morning. But she love the GF Lucky Charms more. I don't love Lucky Charms.
     
  16. namegirl

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    That sounds good. What's your favorite protein powder to use?
     
  17. Lakeman

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    I know we used to get a spike if she has done anything other than run on the lower end in the hours before she wakes up. So what we did is set the basal to deliver some extra insulin to kick in at breakfast. On the days when she runs lower we need to eat a faster breakfast or treat a low first.

    On the days when there might be a spike she might eat a piece of bacon before eating breakfast. The bacon fat works really well to slow other things down and I am not worried about the saturated fat. If we don't have bacon pre-prepared she might have a yogurt for breakfast or just pre-bolus longer. Her preferred breakfast and what I would prefer for her are not the same - she would like a sugary cereal everyday.

    We get large spikes less than ten percent of the time now. normal post prandial highes maybe 80% and lows maybe ten percent.
     
  18. samson

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    Lakeman, 80 percent post-prandial in range, Wow! You inspire me to keep trying to conquer Mt. Breakfast.

    We've tried a bunch of things but a few tricks that have reduced the spike: eating a saltine as soon as my son wake up. It raises blood sugar just enough to prebolus far in advance, and allows him to eat later in the morning, so he's less insulin resistant. We also look at the CGM and wait for the bend before he eats.

    Options that have worked: Carb-cutting tortilla slathered with peanut butter and berries. French toast with sprouted bread, no powdered sugar. Pancakes where we bolus waaay more than we think we need to, then extended bolus for hours.

    For things like pancakes and waffles at home, when it's a new recipe, we make a big batch, enough for a minimum of three consecutive days of meals. We then eat that every single day till it runs out, experimenting with insulin dosing till we've figured out that it's feasible or realistically too difficult. Some foods, obviously, are just causing way too rapid a spike to be properly processed by insulin, and those we avoid or limit to treats.

    Are we the only ones who have had trouble with a low-carb breakfast? Every time we've tried eggs, sausage, carb-free pancakes or waffles, etc., our son has wound up in the low 300s for hours. For him at least, the lack of carbs signals his body to spew out blood sugar, and the saturated fat seems to induce an extraordinary level of insulin resistance. Nut butters don't seem to have quite the same effect somehow.

    We've found a breakfast of right about 15 to 20 g of carbs works well -- enough to avoid insulin resistance, but not enough that it spikes BG for hours.
     
  19. Lakeman

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    I do hope to help but also don't want to mislead you. She is not in range 80% of the time after breakfast. She has a normal reasonable post-prandial high 80% of the time after breakfast.

    I saw someone else here talk about just giving more insulin and if that does not work even more, or more pre-bolus and if that doesn't work even more. Another person said that they give a lot of insulin then later their child comes into range just fine.

    So yes try more and more insulin. We had a ratio as strong as 1:5 at one time. Now we set a basal to peak at breakfast. We definitely pre-bolus and the higher she has been in the hours before breakfast the more we pre-bolus. And regarding those who are afraid to give more insulin because their child comes into range - we sometimes do what I call a "planned low". Give two or three units more than is called for then treat the low later knowing full well that it might happen. The low is no surprise and it is super easy to handle because it is planned. Another thing we do is that on those times when there is a high high after breakfast rather than messing around with corrections we just throw two units at it and watch for lows.

    I have had the opposite observation with fats. We changed from whole milk to 6% and it definitely took the edge off of highs with cereal. On the other hand it seems every time she eats a PB and J she goes high later. I have seen the same thing with zero carb breakfasts so we don't do those. And a single yougurt of 17 - 20 carbs works pretty well too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2016
  20. mmgirls

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    BOTH of my girls need almost Twice the amount of insulin for their first meal of the day and on a school day that might not be enough. I wish I had known that sooner with my oldest, but thanks to finding CWD all so many years ago I started to take mind of the "correction amount" I was always having to give at 2 hours.

    When you stop and realise how much insulin you are giving at 2-4 hours after sustained highs its not so scary to just bite the bullet and adjust the ratio and ISF to be giving what you normall give plus the correction, or in my case I started with about half.

    My oldest is 11years, 80ish lbs, 10 years past dx, and her 1st meal of the day ratio is 1:8 and ISF 1:33. rest of the day it is 1:14 and 1:56. My youngest who is 8 years and 50lbs, and a bit over 2 years in is 1:12 for first meal with a 1:60 isf and 1:23 and 1:115 ISf.
     

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