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Vitamin D

Discussion in 'Research' started by millyyates, Jul 20, 2010.

  1. millyyates

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  2. PatriciaMidwest

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    Our endo has brought up the connection between Vitamin D and Type 1. It kinda surprised because md's don't always embrace supplements, if that makes sense.

    Statistically there are more T1 cases in the northern latitudes where there is less sun to help synthesize vitamin D and also I believe there are more new onsets diagnosed in the winter months which again points to a Vitamin D connection.

    I've seen articles suggesting T1 could be significantly reduced by supplementing appropriate doses of Vitamin D in pregnant women.

    It makes me a little sad that something so simple and inexpensive could have reduced the risk of our kids getting T1. My DD had lab work done and she was low in Vitamin D, although this was after diagnosis.

    We are all taking Vitamin D3 daily.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2010
  3. VinceysMom

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    Ditto here about the low vitamin D after he was diagnosed... do they look for this in regular well-checks? Who knows. Oh well. :( But they found the low Vitamin D prior to official diagnosis, meaning before BG went above 200...in the meantime in the four months between higher than normal BG and dx, he did take extra Vitamin D...of course this did not stop T1... sigh.
     
  4. millyyates

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    More research and articles

    Here are some research papers and articles from the World Health Organisation Bulletin and the Australian National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health


    http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/84/6/485.pdf

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19968813



    Pediatr Diabetes. 2009 Dec 8. [Epub ahead of print]

    Population density determines the direction of the association between ambient ultraviolet radiation and type 1 diabetes incidence.

    Elliott JC, Lucas RM, Clements MS, Bambrick HJ.

    ANU Medical School, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

    Abstract
    Background: Type 1 diabetes incidence has increased rapidly over the last 20 years, and ecological studies show inverse latitudinal gradients for both incidence and prevalence. Some studies have found season of birth or season of diagnosis effects. Together these findings suggest an important role for environmental factors in disease etiology. Objective: To examine whether type 1 diabetes incidence varies in relation to ambient ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in Australian children. Methods: We used case records of 4773 children aged 0-14 yr from the Australian National Diabetes Register to estimate type 1 diabetes incidence in relation to residential ambient UVR, both as a continuous variable and in four categories. We examined season of birth and season of diagnosis and variation in these parameters and in age at diagnosis, in relation to ambient UVR. Results: Overall incidence was 20 per 100 000 population with no sex difference. There was a statistically significant trend toward winter diagnosis (adjusted RR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.13-1.33, p<0.001) but no apparent season of birth effect. Incidence in the highest UVR category was significantly lower than in the lowest UVR category (RR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.75-0.96). We found an inverse association between incidence and ambient UVR that was present only at low population densities; at high population densities type 1 diabetes incidence increased with increasing ambient UVR. Conclusion: In low population density, largely rural environments, ambient UVR may better reflect the personal UV dose, with the latter being protective for the development of type 1 diabetes. This effect is lost or reversed in high population density, largely urban, environments.


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20440696

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19846050
     
  5. millyyates

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  6. millyyates

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  7. Mistync991

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    i think vitamen d is the new hot topic in health care all the sudden both dd's and my dr decided to check into it ...mine was after routene blood work and im very low and will be on a suplament the rest of my life likely and dd's last visit her endo ask about her milk consumption and said she wanted to check it next time she has blood work

    i think there is a connection but i also think people with d may choose a carb free choice over one like say a glass of milk sometimes ..i also think there is a connection between how much people/kids used to" do" outside compaired to all the time spent inside now
     
  8. Enddiabetes

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    I, too, have my child on a "diabetes pack" which contains a lot of Vitamen D. One thing I worry about is an overabundance of calcium and how its is absorbed. What "dose" is thought to be safe and has it been tested? Thanks millyyates!
     
  9. Ali

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    This is a great point. I heard about the use of sunscreen impacting but I think you are right that "we" so rarely now spend time walking to school, events, stores, or spending time in our yards that our exposure has probably declined. This is different from even 50 years ago. I also think that milk consumption for everyone is probably down over the last 100 years.:)ali
     

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