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urine color

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Anja821, Aug 30, 2008.

  1. Anja821

    Anja821 Approved members

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    Would it be safe to say that urine color is also something to look for if a parent is concerned about diabetes? When Evan's symptoms became severe, his urine was completely clear, which was another indication to me that something was very wrong, that his kidneys weren't really filtering the fluids.

    Did you notice that with your child, too?
     
  2. Jensmami

    Jensmami Approved members

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    I don't know about a symptom for diabetes, however I know that when you drink enough your urine should be almost clear. If it is really a dark yellowish, this is a sign that you don't drink enough.

    To get back to the diabetes question, I guess because everybody is drinking so much before dx, their urine looks good and clear.
     
  3. Anja821

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    But clear isn't healthy, is it? There's supposed to be some yellow tint I thought. I'm wondering - for those parents who are concerned about their child drinking too much - if it's something they can watch out for as an additional sign that the body isn't working the way it should be.
     
  4. Jensmami

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  5. Mom2rh

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    When Ryan was diagnosed, by dh who is a retired veterinarian, the urine he left for his dad to take to the veterinary hospital to test was very dark and concentrated. Which I knew was bad since he was drinking so much...
     
  6. MySweethearts

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    Luke was still in diapers when he was dx'd, but I remember that is diapers had no tint to it. I have a young son now in diapers and his has a tint. Also, when Luke is high, most of the time his urine is clear.
     
  7. khoward1017

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    I think the other posters are correct...you want to see the clear urine. When my son has ketone he had very concentrated(dark) urine. One thing that you can tell your friend too look for in detecting diabtes is the fruity breath. If I would have known that that was a sign for diabetes my son would have been diagnoised 5 months prior.
     
  8. Mama Belle

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    You want clear urine. Clear urine (or nearly clear urine) means you are hydrated enough. I never worry about a little bit of yellow, but dark yellow is never good.
     
  9. bgallini

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    I agree. Clear or almost clear urine is a sign that you are well hydrated. But since an undx diabetic drinks a lot, their urine may be very clear.

    I wouldn't use the color of the urine as a sign of D or a sign that a child does not have D.
     
  10. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    I get clear urine when I'm high because I drink so much that there's not much but water and sugar in my urine. I was very puzzled, pre-dx, as to why I was so thirsty and dehydrated, but still had clear urine. In the past, I had clear urine most of the time, but if I got a bit dehydrated, my pee'd get a bit yellow.
    Having clear urine, previous to D, was a sign that I was well hydrated. If you see definite dehydration AND clear urine, yes, that's a suspicious sign. But if you see clear urine and a nondehydrated person, no worries- that's how it is supposed to be.
     

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