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uh oh...what causes a pod to deactivate too early?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by dqmomof3, May 15, 2011.

  1. dqmomof3

    dqmomof3 Approved members

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    LOL...it was too good to be true. Jayden's pod just deactivated.

    What makes a pod deactivate???
     
  2. 5kids4me

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    Not sure, never had that happen I guess. We have had 4 or 5 lost pods in 6 1/2 months. But none that deactivated...
     
  3. buggle

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    I'm really sorry that it happened with the first one. We were so lucky during the first 1.5 years, and we almost never had an issue. It took ages before we ever had a pod failure. When they work, they are almost indestructible. But whether or not Insulet acknowledges it, there seems to be a very high pod failure rate lately. Some people seem to be getting decent batches that don't fail. But many of us have a pretty significant percentage of nearly every box fail. The failures for us happen at all points - can be priming, can be insertion or any other time. I don't know what the error codes mean, but we have an assortment of them. Sometimes, the pods are so touchy, that any movement, such a priming, injection or sometimes just brushing it or the child moving trigger a failure. I don't know what's wrong with the ones that fail. It's bad enough for us that Brendan kept refusing to use them and we went back and forth with MDI until he finally refused to go back at all. He's been on MDI for a while now and right now says that he won't even consider going back.

    Our endo gave us some sterile saline last time we went in, so my hubby and I are going to wear some pods and see if they fail on us.

    If you have several fail in one box, I'd ask them to replace the shipment. I hope this was an anomaly and that the rest of the shipment work.
     
  4. lil'Man'sMom

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    I have found if the PDM had multiple unsuccessful status searches it can deactivate the pod. I always make sure I either "skip" the status search or the status is confirmed before I hit the house button to power it down.

    It also could be a pod error, which you should call into Insulet CS to report the error and get the pod replaced. You can look at the error code in "MY RECORDS" "Alarm History".
     
  5. dqmomof3

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    I just checked the alarm code...it said "occlusion" at 9:42pm. Can I call Insulet for an occlusion error, or is that just something that happens?
     
  6. swellman

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    That just happens unfortunately. What that means is something clogged the line or the pod thought so. It happens once or twice a year for us. It could be a result of a pinched line or a blood vessel hit or, I believe, a reaction and white blood cells in the line.

    You can call them and since you are new maybe they will send you a new one.

    Just change it out and start fresh.
     
  7. Jen_in_NH

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    I've only called Omnipod for occlusions once, and they told me it's just something that happens. We had one box that the first 4 we used all occluded within a few hours.

    But, in almost 2 years with Omnipod, we've probably had less than 10 occlude. Other than those 4 above, most occluded after about 60 hours.
     
  8. dqmomof3

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    When we pulled the pod out, there was a knot that had formed under the skin where the cannula was in her skin. I am hoping this is not a sign of things to come...we had to stop using the MM sensors due to infections under the skin where the sensor wire was inserted. MM Silhouette sites don't do that, though. I guess we'll see.
     
  9. swellman

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    Make sure you scrub the site with an alcohol pad before applying. A good one, not a recalled one (not that we had issues with the recalled ones).

    Make sure you scrub the rubber septum on the insulin before inserting the needle.
     
  10. manda81

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    Ugg I hate when they error! We've never had an occlusion though.

    Errors for us have been 1 per box (on average). Our last box we opened had 8 that failed during priming though. That was a first! They're replacing them all, so I'm not too worried about it.

    The rep told me that the pod does a lot of safety checks, and if any of those checks fail, the pod 'fails'. Of course, an occlusion is different, but if you have any errors in the future, I'd just call it in. They've been really great & helpful every time we've had to call in, and we never have to sit on hold for long. :)
     
  11. ShelbysMom

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    One possibility is if the PDM is trying to get a status, but the pod is too far away, it can deactivate. I don't remember exactly, but I think its if it can't get a status twice....it deactivates. You can call insulet and ask exactly how that works.....but basically if you are looking at the PDM and your child is not near you, be sure to press skip so it doesn't try for status and then fail.
     
  12. Darryl

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    It happens sometimes, for us probably around 1 in 10 pods expires early with an occ. alarm. Most often it's after the pod shows signs of having been physically stressed (adhesive stretched or loose). When we call insulet, they don't ask for us to return them anymore, but they usually give us credit towards the next order. We usually don't call them, though, unless it fails on day 1 or 2.
     
  13. saxmaniac

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    Wow, that's very rare for us. Most of the on-body pod failures we see are static, and even that is only once every few months. One or two per year might die during priming.

    I can't remember the last time we had an occlusion error... probably when we first started podding and still were learning about best placement, orientation, how to pinch, tape down, etc. Fortunately, fashion is not a factor into our site locations, so we can optimize "what works" over "what looks good".
     
  14. dqmomof3

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    So tell me what you learned about best placement, orientation, etc.. I love NOT having to learn everything the hard way. I remember your tip about filling the pod while it's standing on end, so to speak, in order to eliminate the air bubbles. Whatever else any of you have to offer, I am ready to learn.
     
  15. vettechmomof2

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    My daughter wears pods on her thighs, belly, lower back, butt and arms.
    She only gets 2 days from her thigh sites and she prefers her butt and arms for her cgms sites though.
    We pinch up the skin where the cannula will go and keep it pinched until insertion. In the middle of winter when static is high she carries a dryer sheet with her to help with static.
    room temp insulin to fill the pod.
    We do all sorts of directions for the placement of pods. She normally likes to shower first, then we use an alcohol wipe to remove any soaps, air dry for a second or 2 then pod placement. She prefers to remove the pods in the shower.
    If you do not take a pod off right away MAKE SURE THAT YOU MARK WHICH ONE IS THE OLD ONE.:rolleyes: If we are out and about and she does not feel like removing it then she normally justs puts a x on the old ones but she accidently removed the active pod once by mistake. We learned our lesson after that one.
    Any other questions just ask.
     
  16. PatriciaMidwest

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    Stick with it -- the first month is a learning curve. It does get much easier and consistent after you find what works for your child.

    We have good luck with horizontal placement on the lower back or stomach. The cannula needs to be pointed away from the spine since the tissue will be leaner towards the spine (better absorption if cannula is not in this lean tissue.) She likes the arms too, but for us it requires a wrap to stay on, and DD wasn't too excited about it or consistent with it. Some kids don't mind.

    Check on your pod and see if the actual pod is tearing away from the adhesive patch. This will pull out the cannula and it errors as an occlusion, at least for us. Using a little double faced tape prevents that problem.

    As far as cannula insertions, everyone has their own tricks that work for them. I've tried a lot of different things and what works best for us is to just push down a bit on the needle end of the pod as it inserts. It just prevents the pod from kicking back - which would result in a cannula not inserted far enough. I don't hold the skin while inserting at all (I'm putting it in an area with some fatty tissue). The pushing up, pulling up pinching up stuff seemed to coincide with occluded pods for us. Everyone is different though. I can see how a smaller child might need pinching up/pulling up vs a teen.

    There is a picture in the manual that shows placement. Some areas are horizontal and some need to be vertical.

    Good luck to you guys!
     
  17. saxmaniac

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    Some good tips there. But, you'll still have to experiment... since is every kid is different, so what I learned won't always work for you.

    Case in point - if we put the pod on his stomach or butt he SCREAMS, and on top of that, it doesn't absorb well. So we only try that area once or twice a year to see if things have changed, otherwise we stick to arms and front of the legs.
     

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