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Type 1 Teen and Seizure

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by jdr, Apr 6, 2011.

  1. Amy C.

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    It is possible that this has nothing to do with diabetes. Other conditions are the cause of seizures. Hopefully your doctor will investigate all the options, not just diabetes to get some answers.
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    I will say that it raises big red flags for me that the other boys are not "able" to talk about the incident. Big red flags.

    I also want to point out that intelligence has nothing to do with drug or alcohol use, and I've seen the smartest of kids do some pretty dumb things.

    Your best source of information for finding out what actually happened is to talk to the boys who were actually there. I hope you get some answers.
     
  3. jdr

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    Again, no drugs or drinking involved. Blood and urine test don't lie.
     
  4. frizzyrazzy

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    despite their delicate feelings, I'd probably start demanding to know what was going on right before it happened.
     
  5. MamaC

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    My teen son has had hypo seizures (one that resulted in a near drowning) in front of his friends...I find that they all need to talk about these events. They need help working through the experience, boys and girls alike. My daughter (in her 20s) still needs to talk about those hypos. And memory of the event by the person who suffered it is not at all uncommon.

    BG numbers afterward may not read low...the body's natural defense is to "feed" a bad low, if it can.

    After my son's first seizure, when he never read lower than 85 in the ER, the endo ordered an EEG and a visit to the neurologist to rule out epilepsy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2011
  6. Flutterby

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    As someone stated above, the big things for kids is making themselves black out.. they play these games, there is not need for drugs or alcohol to be involved.. Making themselves black out can be done a number of ways..

    The other thing, if huffing is involved, can that be found on tox screenings (not saying that this is what happened, just curious if this is something that can be screened for.)?
     
  7. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    Very possible it was a rebound, but do get him checked
     
  8. PatriciaMidwest

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    I'm so sorry to hear this -- hope you get some answers.

    It would be good for the boys mentally to get this info out and put it behind them as well. It might provide helpful information to you as well, maybe there is something the boys didn't even think was relevant.

    I'm glad the tox screens came back normal..that is good news.
     
  9. mathcat

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    I hope you find answers soon.

    The possibilities mentioned such as hypoglycemia with rebound, breath holding or some other game, epilepsy or other neurological issue seem to all be valid avenues to consider. I suspect there are other possibilities not yet mentioned.

    Based on personal experience, I recommend a visit with a neurologist complete with an EEG and potentially other tests. The wait may be long but if the issue is epilepsy or something neurological, it would be good to know. After 2 seizures with in range numbers I got my son in to find that he has epilepsy. His ended up being an easy case to figure out once the right testing was done. I know others go through the same testing with answers as clear as mud.

    Personally, I would make an appointment with a neurologist now. It will probably be a while before your son gets seen. If you get an answer before that appointment, you could always just cancel. But, if you wait until later to even try to make an appointment, it will take even longer before your son can be seen.
     
  10. hawkeyegirl

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    Yes. I was mostly responding to your implication that the boys were too smart to use alcohol or drugs. In my experience, there is no such thing.

    Get these boys to tell you what was going on. Your son's health is more important than their delicate sensibilities.
     
  11. jdr

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    There is one thing that I would like to clarify, these teenage boys that were hanging out with my son were not unsupervised. There were many adults, including uncles and grandparents at the house with them.
     
  12. hawkeyegirl

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    That would probably have been relevant information to mention earlier in the thread. :rolleyes:
     
  13. jdr

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    Yes, you are correct. I should have mentioned this earlier.
    It has been a stressful time.
     
  14. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    It's just so sad that no one thought to call you when the ambulance was called! :(
     
  15. Christopher

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    So what did those many adults have to say about the events leading up to and during the collapse of your son?
     
  16. caspi

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    Uncles and grandparents and the first call you receive is from the HOSPITAL?! To say I would be upset at the adults in attendance for not notifying me would be an understatement!

    I can give teenage boys some slack, but I'm not so sure about grown adults that were there, relatives no less, that I presume know your son has had D for 5 years now. Not that I would expect them to administer a glucagon, but a phone call would have been nice! Sheesh! :eek:
     
  17. jdr

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    It was late, and they were awakened by my son's freind running into the room screaming that something was wrong with Jess. His uncle called 911 and then tried to call us, but got the answering machine. We do not have a regular phone in our bedroom, we had our cell phones in our room. When we got the call from the hospital on one of the cell phones and we were headed down our drive, his freind's uncle was coming up the drive to tell us what had just happened. He was very shook up, he and Jess's freind came by the house on Saturday to check up on him, said that it was a terrifying experience.
     
  18. hdm42

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    I second this advice. If they have not already referred you to a neurologist, find one and get an appointment. I would want a full EEG workup to make sure there's not something else going on.

    I'm so sorry your son (and you) went through this. Seizures are scary.
     
  19. nanhsot

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    Another ditto to this. There are many reasons for seizures and hypoglycemia is one of them, I wouldn't rule it out but I also wouldn't assume it was. What were his blood sugars in the hours prior? I know that my son is a lot less exact when with friends and has been known to horribly SWAG and give too much insulin (he recently had a 64 with 11 units on board!! luckily he caught it and was able to stuff some cake in his mouth before it dropped further).

    I'm sorry you had this experience, it's a parent's worst nightmare, a call from a hospital. I know you must still be reeling from it all. I hope you find some answers.
     
  20. Pauji5

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    I so agree. It isn't about their "feelings" - it's about what happened to your son.
     

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