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Two months after dx - would it be unreasonable...

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by momofone, Aug 5, 2011.

  1. momofone

    momofone Approved members

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    to start pushing for a pump? All of the research I have done has shown considerable benefits, even for a honeymooner. We are desperate for flexibility - the strict food regimen is just too much. The poor kid is never, ever hungry because we are feeding him all the time. It's not a lot of food but he's so sick of it. And the whole timing thing with NPH makes me crazy some days. My life is hectic enough as it is and we feel ruled by a clock. Why should we have to live like this if we don't have to?
     
  2. Marie4Julia

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    I don't think that would be unreasonable at all. My daughter was on a pump about 1 month after diagnosis.

    While you are working on getting a pump approved, paid for, etc. It may be worth speaking with your doctor about switching from NPH to MDI using lantus or levemir as basal. This would give you more freedom, and once you have the basal/bolus correct, you wouldn't have to feed the insulin as you do now. This would also help to prepare you for carb counting and bolusing with a pump.

    Good Luck!
     
  3. selketine

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    If your child needs basal 24 hours a day - then you could switch to lantus. My son didn't need basal overnight until about 2 months after he was dx'd (he was also 2 yrs old though) - we couldn't switch to lantus until he did.

    I MUCH preferred lantus to NPH - hated NPH.

    Absolutely you can start lobbying for a pump. I was really annoyed the pedi endo wanted us to wait 6 months - my life would have been FAR easier to have a pump about 2-3 months in. I know we need to learn how to give shots but really...I would have promised to practice on an orange every day or something...:p
     
  4. momofone

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    We've had the injection thing down from day one. Didn't bother any of us, including Max. He doesn't need anything to cover his nighttime. He just gets the NPH in the morning along with 1.5 of rapid, although there was mention of some supper rapid guidelines the other day via email. There has also been mention of "when he needs NPH twice a day," which scared me. I don't want him on anything that peaks during the night - I don't care how well some kids do on it. I'm sure they just want the NPH to cover lunch when he is in school but I really have no problem going up there to give him rapid, or on the pump he could just do it himself with supervision. I mean, let's get the show on the road. It's not like D is going anywhere anytime soon.

    Last night he brought himself down from 14 to 4.3 this morning at 7:30. He was 12 at 3:30 a.m.
     
  5. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    If you want to pump, you should be allowed, I know of people who pump from diagnoses! Wish I had of been one of them!
     
  6. obtainedmist

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    We started pushing for it after a few office visits and we were pumping (after jumping through some hoops with an insurance appeal) around 4 months after dx. It did cause some additional ups and downs as we got the basal amounts correct and all the techniques with the infusion sets...but once that was done...it's been smooth sailing! The flexibility is so fabulous. Molly can snack all day and feel like a normal teen again!
     
  7. mocha

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    Go ahead and push for one. It sounds like your son and the rest of the family would benefit from the flexibility that a pump would offer. Good luck! :cwds:
     
  8. JackyH

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    I pushed hard at every opportunity - they finally agreed in March - 4 months after dx but the pump sat on the table until June before we could get into a pump class - exactly seven long, frustrating months after dx. If we hadn't pushed they would have allowed us to pump after a year.
     
  9. deafmack

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    I agree that your son should not have to wait to pump. I think it is a great idea and I would push for it. Wishing you the best.
     
  10. Kayeecee

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    We had a Dexcom in 2 months and were on Omnipod in 3 months. I would not rest until I got what I believed was the best tools for our family. A tip: use the sales reps to help you get what you want. They are the most motivated to put these devices in your hands because they make a commission. They deal with insurance companies and unwilling endo offices all the time. And trust your sense of the absurd when the 'pros' are trying to stand in your way with garbage like 'you need to wait 6 months' that cannot be backed up factually, theoretically or medically. Good luck.
     
  11. momofone

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    I don't think I can go through a rep in Canada. Thank you for everyone's helpful suggestions and motivation.
     
  12. nanhsot

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    Not too soon at all, but be aware that some insurance companies dictate a wait, it can take a long time to get approval, etc.

    I'd start pushing for that, but I'd also start pushing for lantus/levemir along with novolog/humalog regimen immediately. That will give you a bit of the flexibility you need while you wait for pump approval.
     
  13. momofone

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    My understanding is probably flawed on this one, but I don't think they want him on Levemir right now because it stays in their system for 24 hours and he produces his own at night?
     
  14. selketine

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    My son also did not need any overnight basal insulin right after diagnosis so he used NPH until his overnight numbers increased enough that we could give lantus. So your understanding is exactly right if that is what is happening with your child. It took 2-3 months for him to need overnight basal.

    However this would not preclude you from using a pump at this time. You would just set it to not give basal at night.
     
  15. momofone

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    My guy is the opposite. He needed Rapid and Levemir with supper right after diagnosis and now doesn't. I know that won't last though.
     
  16. Tracy1918

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    My son is 10, diagnosed last year and we started pumping in December (six months after diagnosis).

    One thing I remember our doctor saying to us was that he wanted us to be VERY comfortable giving shots/calculating insulin amounts before going on the pump.

    He said too many "Katrinas" happen....times when trouble comes and you need to be prepared.

    Of course, that would be a different time table for everyone, but I see his point and thought it was good advice.
     
  17. momof2greatkids

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    I don't think it's too early. When I went to a general diabetes education two weeks after Audrey was diagnosed, there were two other families there with kids diagnosed the same weekend as Audrey. One of the kids was already on a pump, and the other was getting theirs the next day.
     
  18. momofone

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    I'm hoping that at our followup this week they'll get into adjusting insulin guidelines. No one has even mentioned I:C ratios. I would agree with the doc's advice - pump failures happen and you have to know what to do in that event.
     
  19. McKenna'smom

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    I would have loved to get a pump soon afer diagnosis, however, our insurance company reqiured that they wouldn't pay for pump until a minimum of 6 months after diagnosis. Pretty much for the same reasons stated above, getting comfortable with calculating carbs and drawing up syringes or pens. My DD was diagnosed in December and started pumping the following July.
     
  20. rebesser

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    Insulin pumps have physiological advantage

    I have had diabetes for 26 years and I must say that my diabetes could only be managed with relative ease into my unpredictable lifestyle by using a pump. If it was up to me pumps would be offered to everyone with type 1 from diagnosis. I am a believer in carb counting and letting your diabetes fit into your life, without compromising blood sugar control.

    In the UK the main issue is funding and education, which is slowly improving. If these aren't your barriers, go for it!!!

    Here's some other info you may want to know :
    Insulin pumps are the closest thing there is to what happens normally ie continuous basal insulin 24hours a day with boluses for carbohydrates. A big difference in contrast to normal physiology is that the insulin given via a pump is peripheral ie into fatty tissue under the skin versus portal (directly into blood system). Also there is no continuous feedback loop between sensing and bolusing (yet).

    Of course many people do well on different insulin regimens (and as such some do well on pumps, and for others pumps do not suit them at all). Everyone with diabetes is individual so finding the regimen that suits your child is crucial.
     

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