- advertisement -

Tween becoming non-compliant

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by sassypantz, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. PatriciaMidwest

    PatriciaMidwest Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,297
    She was in range all day? Not sure if that is a typo. That's good of course. Maybe just tweak the night basal a bit more.

    Maybe you meant she was OUT of range all day after waking up at 215. If DD wakes up with that kind of number (it happens) it takes a while to get things back on track, unfortunately. My DD can be quite insulin resistant in the morning, plus then you have the post breakfast spike to contend with.
     
  2. sassypantz

    sassypantz Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    310
    No, she was in range or close to it all day. But it's been ages since she woke up high, all week she's been waking up in the 90's! You'd think that after increasing the basal, she'd be at higher risk of waking up low.
     
  3. danismom79

    danismom79 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2008
    Messages:
    5,300
    Does she have the same basal rate all day?
     
  4. PatriciaMidwest

    PatriciaMidwest Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,297
    Yep, it should work the way you described! It could be hormonal/growth too. Seems like so much of that takes place in the overnight/early morning hours.
     
  5. sassypantz

    sassypantz Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    310
    Yes, she's on the same basal all day for now. I expect that will change after school starts--all her summer activities are over now and she's just sitting around most of the day around here. I would have expected a change in her ratios rather than the basal since the highs were after meals, although I guess it makes a little sense in that the highs got progressively worse throughout the day. It still doesn't explain the new morning highs, though. I have to chalk it up to hormones.
     
  6. zakksmom

    zakksmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    245
    Very cool advice.. I needed that today. Thanks!!
     
  7. Omo2three

    Omo2three Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Messages:
    1,663
    Amy (((((HUGS))))) hon you need a break, and if your dd Bg has been high it might be making her moody. On top of being a tween...with those hormones making her more insulin resistant. Puberty sucks...and D and puberty is just insane.

    Ever notice how you can tell your child to do something and you get eye- rolls and another person (non-related) can get them to jump through hoops.

    I would ask your CDE to speak to her, or a counselor. I know our clinic has counselors that work with kids having difficulties managing their d.

    When you can find some time to get away...refresh and re- energize and then see if you can sit down with her and make a game plan.
    I had to do this with Ambrea, she was more weepy and moody Puberty just hit, along with it my dad was ill, and she was overwhelmed with the scoliosis diagnoses....so I took her brace away...said we will deal with our sadness this week. ( my dad's funeral), but the D was not an option to delete...I tried to simplify her life...then we added stuff in as she could handle it...but we sat down and made a plan...and within reason...I gave her control over things she could have control over....

    I know our situation is different, but I honestly believe they feel like they have no control over their life...with this disease...then add puberty...eeks!:eek:

    Let us know ...how your doing:cwds:
     
  8. dk10

    dk10 Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2008
    Messages:
    22
    I checked out your post because I've started facing the lies with my near-11 year old. The breaking of trust was hurting me badly.

    There's a lot of good advise out there! I hope it's helped you. It certainly helped me get some perspective on my situation.

    Whenever I have trouble managing my daughter I find (after a long, long, frustrating while) that what finally works best is changing my own behaviour towards her. I really like the advice about treating her like a 3 year old (with a smile) and the bit about the cell phone as a reward (a positive incentive rather than a stick:))

    Best wishes.
     
  9. sassypantz

    sassypantz Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    310
    Just a brief update since I last posted about this: I FINALLY found a counselor for her--in addition to the D issues, she would still benefit from at least a few counseling sessions: her dad has issues (possibly bi-polar, definitely depressive), and she seems more and more to think like her dad, waaay too much self-loathing.

    I had a long talk with her about what was going on--I chose it on a night when I was NOT upset so that I could approach her more calmly. She claims the testing issues were a combination of not wanting to, not thinking she's worth all the effort it takes to stay healthy, and just plain forgetting. We talked about depression, responsibility, how her behavior effects the rest of the family (she had no idea that the first thing her little brother does every morning is go to her room and check to make sure she's OK).

    I made two deals with her: first, all this week, she has to do her chores without complaint, and she's grounded from the computer (where she spends most of her time) For every time I have to tell her to do them, we're adding 2 more days of being grounded. And to balance it out, during that same time, if she tests every day at every scheduled time (3 pre-meals, one bedtime), after one week, I'll give her $20 to buy art supplies (her favorite hobby is drawing, and she's getting pretty darned good at it). If she reaches that goal, I'll extend the deal to a second week for another $20. Money has been super-tight for our family lately, she understands this is a big deal. And she is VERY motivated. We're nearing the end of two days in a row of no arguments over chores or testing. I swear I hear choirs of angels sing when I hear her say, "I've got to wash the dishes, then I'm going to test for breakfast."

    I also ordered a book from Amazon that Ellen had linked to in the Parents of Teens forum, it looks really good: http://www.amazon.com/Getting-Calm-C.../dp/0982345402 It was a similar book about toddlers/preschoolers that helped me stop the temper tantrums when she was about 3, so it's worth a shot!
     
  10. MikailasMom

    MikailasMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2009
    Messages:
    383
    WTg Amy! That must feel amazing to be where you are now compared to where you were a few weeks ago! Well done to both of you!
     
  11. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    8,719
    Amy I just wanted to say that I think you are being very proactive and it sounds like you and Samantha are really getting somewhere here:cwds: And I have to admit I got a little choked up when you mentioned that her brother looked in her room in the morning to make sure she was ok. What a wonderful brother and boy he is;)
     
  12. ecs1516

    ecs1516 Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Messages:
    7,028
    It really sounds like you are making process. That is just wonderful!
     
  13. StillMamamia

    StillMamamia Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2007
    Messages:
    13,195

    This is AWESOME!!!

    Best of luck with the counseling. I hope better days are ahead for her (and for you too)!
     
  14. kiwiliz

    kiwiliz Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    893
    I agree with Paula - this is Awesome! Especially as the first option you considered was tying her up! LOL! (Which would work by the way!):D
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice