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Tslim temperature sensor

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by RomeoEcho, May 28, 2014.

  1. RomeoEcho

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    Just received an email from Tandem with information about the Tslim temperature sensor. I like that it has an alarm, but do not like that it will shut down delivery. As some one who works in extreme temperatures (up to 120-140F ambient), I'd much rather continue to receive potentially compromised insulin than be unable to receive any at all.

    "-When the insulin inside the pump is exposed to heat above 98.6°F, the alarm will sound and insulin delivery will be stopped. At this point, the insulin may no longer be safe to use and should be monitored and discarded if you experience high blood sugar without other causes (according to the insulin manufacturer’s instructions).
    -When the alarm sounds, the pump needs to be removed from the heat source before insulin delivery can be resumed. You should replace the cartridge and insulin as soon as possible.
    -This feature was designed to protect you from receiving affected insulin. Your t:slim Pump has been tested to operate in a wide range of temperatures from -4°F to 140°F so even when the temperature alarm is triggered, your pump is not in danger."
     
  2. Melissata

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    Have you considered using a Frio for your pump?
     
  3. mmgirls

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    Just another short sighted, sounds good on paper position they decided to take. While I understand this is helpful to a new pumper to help troubleshoot, it should be something you should be able to turn off. Just like the no reverse correction till under 70.

    But I wonder if you just got the pump "cooler" it would resume?

    What do you do? I would not be able to work in above 110ish degrees unless it was Mad Maxxish times or the Zombies have come.
     
  4. mamattorney

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    I think you can start it right back up again.
     
  5. rgcainmd

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    Exactly what I was thinking. What DO you do?
     
  6. suzyr

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    We had this happen over spring break when we left the pump in out in the sun while she was swimming.
    It took only about two minutes under the towel to "cool" the pump down enough to resume insulin.
    We did not need to change the cartridge/insulin out....but it was nice to know that we should consider that the insulin was compromised if did encounter high blood sugars after.
     
  7. RomeoEcho

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    I have a frio, but honestly it just isn't practical at that point. I use them for insulin storage at high temps when refrigeration isn't available, but I've never really been able to use the pump one for my pump. I can't put it on a belt for safety reasons, and I just don't have that kind of pocket real-estate. (I'm not even sure a pocket would have sufficient airflow for it) in the peak heat, I usually just change cartridges every couple of days instead of weekly.
     
  8. RomeoEcho

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    Ha! Operations/power engineering, often in tropical climates. At 110, even with physical labor it's hot but tolerable. 120 is about the max I can do sustained physical work in, and above that it's painful, do what you have to do and get out. The most I did was about 155-160, and at that point you can feel yourself cooking and you very quickly loose logic, reason and dexterity, you're on a "death clock" at that point. I'm ok not doing that again.

    But don't worry, when I'm home, I'll still whine if it hits 80 :)

    I'm expecting a hot streak in the next couple weeks, so I guess I'll find out soon whether it will be a problem or not.
     
  9. RomeoEcho

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    Thanks, that's comforting to hear that it recovered that quickly.
     
  10. mmgirls

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    To me it seems like maybe you might need a frio for at least a backup to cool the pump.?

    Otherwise maybe you may need to find a thinner product that will work.
     
  11. mmgirls

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    I just don't like sweating I guess and can not imagine temps above 110 and be working no less.
     
  12. cococay

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    As odd as it sounds, the closer your pump is to your body in very hot conditions, the cooler it would stay. If your body is able to maintain normal temp, and your pump is very close, then the pump will remain around 98.6. The problems would come into play if the heat causes your body temp to increase too much, or if the pump is further from the bidy and more exposed to the high temps .

    I also find it odd that they set the pump up to stop insulin rather than just an alarm, which woukd be enough to give you the extra troubleshooting info you need if you have unexplained high bgs later. Also, why not allow a little higher temp, like 104-106 the range of a high fever vs. Cutoff at burns body temp.
     

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