advertisement

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Trick or Treat

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by cgbphp, Sep 21, 2011.

  1. cgbphp

    cgbphp Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    My son was just diagnosed in June with type 1. I also have a four year old daughter. I am trying to find a fair alternative to trick or treat. Or decide if I should let either child participate in trick or treat. Anyone have any suggestions?
     
  2. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,736
    Sorry to hear about your son's dx, but you have found a great site for information and support.

    I would suggest letting him trick or treat. What reason would you give him that he couldn't? That he has diabetes? That would not only create resentment in him but it is really not necessary. Let him go trick or treating and at the end of the night he can come home, empty out his bag, pick out the candy he wants to eat right then. You figure out the carbs, give him insulin to cover the carbs, and he goes to town on the candy like every other child does on Halloween.

    If you really want to limit the amount of candy he has collected, after he has gorged on the candy, have him do a little "auction" and you can buy the remaining candy from him. He can keep a few of his favorites to eat later and he gets some money in his pocket as well.

    Here is a list of carb counts for many of the candies that people give out:

    http://www.diabetes.org/assets/pdfs/youth/ada-halloween-candy-list.pdf

    I realize that the first Halloween with diabetes is a little scary ;) but with all the knowledge and tools that we have at our disposal in this day and age, there really should not be any activity that our children cannot participate in, simply because they have diabetes. Good Luck.....
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2011
  3. Lenoremm

    Lenoremm Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    145
    I agree, a big part of Trick or Treating is the social aspect of running around with friends. Let them do it. I was pleasantly surprised by how much my CWD self monitored himself last year. He had a few treats and dosed appropriately for them but didn't go crazy (face down in the bag of candy). He told me later he knows he feels yucky if he eats like most other kids do.
    Most of the candy ended up going to the church and they shipped it to the soldiers over seas. The kids felt better about that.

    My problem is what to offer at the door for trick or treaters. Maybe glow sticks.
     
  4. MamaBear

    MamaBear Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,906
    I understand the fear. Last Halloween was our very first with Diabetes and I was terrified of letting my son trick or treat as he had in years past. I posted a topic about it too. I ended up following the advice of the folks here, saved that candy carb list Christopher mentioned, and we went trick or treating. Everything turned out just fine, and it will for you too. Let him go, just keep a few pieces of candy in your pocket in case he feels a little low while out and about, and give him insulin for the candy he wants to have when you get home. It may be a little different than years past, but Halloween can still be fun for your family. :)
     
  5. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,736
    What about offering them................candy?
     
  6. MamaBear

    MamaBear Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,906
    Here is a bit more. This was posted last year on CWD Sorry if it repeats anything already posted in the link Christopher provided. :cwds:



    Chocolate Bars and Kisses (Mostly Chocolate)
    Dove Milk Chocolate Promises or wrapped squares (8 g) - 42 calories and 6 g carb
    Hershey Kisses - 26 calories and 8 g carb each kiss

    Hershey Kisses with Almonds - 23 calories and 2 g carb each kiss

    Hershey Kisses filled with Caramel - 21 calories and 3 g carb each kiss

    Hershey Candy Corn Kisses - 27 calories and 3 g carb each kiss

    Hershey's Milk Chocolate Bars - Fun size (14 g) - 67 calories and 8 g carb

    Hershey's Miniature Bars (mixed) - average of 42 calories and 5 g carb each bar

    M&Ms, plain, Fun size (18 g) - 88 calories and 12 g carb

    M&Ms, peanut

    Fun size (18 g) - 93 calories and 11 g carb
    1/4 cup candy - 220 calories and 24 g carb
    Miniature Bars (Milky Way, Snickers, Twix, 3 Muskateers) - average 38 calories and 5 g carb each bar
    Mr. Goodbar Snack size (17 g) - 90 calories and 9 grams carb

    Nestle's Crunch Bars Fun size (10 g) 50 calories and 7 grams carb

    Nestle's Crunch Caramel Bars - Fun size - 70 calories and 9 g carb

    Palmer Peanut Butter cups, small - 6 g carb

    Three Muskateers bar

    Fun size (15 g) - 64 calories and 11 g carb
    Mint, Fun size (15g) - 64 calories and 11 g carb
    Tootsie Rolls
    Small bar - 50 calories and 10 g carb
    Midgee - 23 calories and 7 g carb
    Mini-Midgees - 11 calories and 2 g carb
    Peanut and Peanut Butter Candies
    Pay Day - Snack size (19 g) - 90 calories and 10 g carb
    Reese's Peanut Butter Cups

    Miniature (about 9 grams each) - 44 calories and 5 g carb per cup
    Snack size (17 g) - 88 calories and 10 g carb
    Snack size (21 g) - 100 calories and 12 g carb
    White, Snack size (21 g) - 100 calories and 11 g carb
    Reese's Peanut Butter Pumpkins (34 g) - 180 calories and 17 g carb
    Reese's Crispy Crunchy Bar, Snack size (17 g) - 95 calories and 9 g carb

    Reese's Nutrageous Bars, Snack size (17 g) - 88 calories and 9 g carb

    Reese's Whipps Bar, Snack size (14 g) - 60 calories and 10 g carb

    Mixed Candy Bars
    100 Grand Bars
    Fun size (11 g) - 50 calories and 8 g carb
    Fun size (21 g) - 95 calories and 15 g carb
    Almond Joy Snack size (15 g) - 80 calories and 10g carb
    Baby Ruth Bar, Fun size (18 g each) - 85 calories and 13 g carb

    Butterfinger Bar, Fun size (18 g each) - 85 calories 14 g carb

    Butterfinger Crisp Bar, Snack size (20 g) - 100 calories and 13 g carb

    Heath Bar, Snack size (13 g) - 74 calories and 9 g carb

    Kit Kat, Fun size (14 g) - 73 calories and 9 g carb

    Milky Way bar, Fun size (17 g) - 75 calories and 12 g carb

    Mounds bars, Snack size (17 g) - 83 calories and 9 g carb

    Rocky Road, Snack size (10 g) - 45 calories and 6 g carb

    Snickers Bars, Fun size (17 g) - 80 calories and 10 g carb

    Snickers Almond Bars, Fun size (17 g) - 80 calories and 11 g carb

    Snickers Creme Pumpkin (1 oz) - 150 calories and 16 g carb

    Take Five bar, Fun size (15 g) - 10 g carb

    Twix, Snack size (10 g) - 50 calories and 7 g carb

    Taffy and Caramel
    AbbaZabba, small (12 g) 50 calories and 11 g carb
    Charleston Chew bar, Fun size (10 g) - 45 calories and 8 g carb

    Laffy Taffy, Chocolate, small bars (8 g each) - 32 calories and 7 g carb

    Milk Duds Snack size (12 g) - 54 calories and 9 g carb

    Milk Maid Caramels, Brach's - 40 calories and 10 g carb per piece

    Fruity and Gummy Candies
    Jujyfruits - 9 pieces - 60 calories and 16 g carb
    Lifesavers Gummies (2 rolls per ounce) - 52 calories and 13 g carb per roll

    Mini Dots (2 small boxes per ounce) 70 calories and 17 g carb per box

    Skittles

    Original Fruit, Fun size (20 g) - 80 calories and 18 g carb
    Chocolate Assortment, Fun size (20 g) - 80 calories and 18 g carb
    Starburst, Fun size (2 pieces per stick) - 40 calories and 10 g carb
    Twizzlers

    Mini-bars (14 g) - 11 g carb
    Strawberry Twists, Short (9 g) - 32 calories and 7 g carb
    Cherry Pull-N-Peel (12 g) - 40 calories and 9 g carb
    Hard Candies and Pops
    Blow Pop, Junior - 50 calories and 14 g carb
    Jolly Rancher

    Hard Candy (6 g) - 23 calories and 6 g carb
    Lollipops (17 g) - 60 calories and 16 g carb
    Hard Candy Sticks, Small (11g) - 43 calories and 10 g carb
    Double Blasts (4 g) - 13 calories and 3 g carb
    Tootsie Pops - 60 calories and 15 g carb
    Tootsie Caramel Apple Pops - 60 calories and 15 g carb

    Wonka Nerds - small box (13 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

    Other Candies
    Candy Corn, Brach's - 11 pieces - 70 calories and 18 g carb
    Hot Tamales - small pkg (14 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

    Jr. Mints, Fun size (10 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

    Mike and Ike small box (14 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

    Pop Rocks - small packet (10 g) - 7 g carb

    Raisinettes, Fun size (16 g - about 16 pieces) - 56 calories and 11 g carb

    Smarties Candy, Roll - 25 calories and 6 g carb

    Whoppers

    1 small tube - 30 calories and 5 g carb
    1 small pouch (21 g) - 100 calories and 16 g carb
    York Peppermint Patties
    Regular small patty (14 g) - 53 calories and 11 g carb
    Pink Peppermint Patties, small (14 g) - 53 calories and 11 g carb
    Peppermint Patty Pumpkins (14 g) - 50 calories and 11 g carb
     
  7. cgbphp

    cgbphp Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Thanks to everyone for the quick responses. I am very new to all this. My son is 2 I think I failed to mention that. He is also getting ready to go on a pump. I am still not sure if a pump is the right thing for him at this time. He is a very rowdy 2 year old boy and my worry is that it will get pulled out constantly. His diabetes is no where close to being controlled I am still calling the endo every week because it seems no matter how they change his ratios he is still running high. He is currently on novolog and lantus.
     
  8. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,675
    We were already dealing with cane and corn allergies before diabetes, so our favorite item to pass out is the small Play-dohs. They're fun to have as left-overs. :D
     
  9. cdninct

    cdninct Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    Messages:
    887
    My son was diagnosed in December at 2-1/2, so this is our first Halloween too. I remember being devastated at the time that we could never do trick-or-treating again, but I am totally over that! We will all be going out on Halloween! Your son, like mine, is young, so it's not like you have to do a lot of houses or get a lot of candy. You can also control how much he eats, of what, and when. Even last year,when diabetes was furthest from our minds, we made sure that his sugary candy "disappeared" while his chocolate remained (for the most part)! The same thing will happen this year. We don't treat lows with candy, but if we did I guess we would put some of it aside.

    Just as an aside, our son started pumping the week after his third birthday. He is a busy, careless, clumsy little guy, but we have had no problems with the pump staying on. The added bonus is that we don't have to try eyeballing quarters of units on syringes anymore, as the pump can deal with very small increments. People make choices about treatments based on many different factors, so I would never tell anybody else what to do. I would say, don't let the fear of the site being pulled out deter you.
     
  10. lgouldin

    lgouldin Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2011
    Messages:
    249
    Candy is always nice to give away:D

    But, I guess you could be know as the Glow Stick house. You would be one up on the Tooth Brush house:p but not as good as the Big Candy Bar house:D.
     
  11. Flutterby

    Flutterby Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2006
    Messages:
    14,623
    Welcome! Sorry about your son's dx, but glad you've found this site.



    I wouldn't change a thing.. I'd do Halloween as you always do. Your son, and daughter, have seen enough changes already, no need to add more. A few different things we've done in the pass, they went Trick or treating then 'traded' that candy in for a new toy.. Or, we keep it for a few days, and it dissapears, after I've taken all the candy out that we can use for lows.. the last visits the trash.. they never ask about it.. heck, I'm still throwing out easter candy. ;)


    Let them dress up and have fun. :)
     
  12. lisamustac

    lisamustac Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Messages:
    640
    Sorry about your son. The first Halloween is scary :eek: we were almost a year in before our first Halloween so I was comftorable. Print out the candy carb list and dose accordingly.
    My son was on a pump before he was 2 and he is the most reckless kid you could meet. He has pulled a site out once. Pumping is a big learning curve but for the little ones it gives them more freedom(IMO)
    Enjoy Halloween and take it as it comes. If he's high correct and move on:)
    I have my kids trade in the rest of the candy for a little toy.
     
  13. zoomom456

    zoomom456 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2011
    Messages:
    340
    My son was 2 when he started on the pump as well. The only sites my son has ever pulled out have been the kinked ones. By the way, William thinks wrestling is a way of life. He climbs and jumps out of trees all the time. He has tried to ride our poor springer spaniel like a horse. His pump has taken some beatings and keeps going. My favorite was when he pulled his pump out of the pouch and walked it like a dog on a leash:eek: So we bought a pouch that we could lock with a luggage lock.

    As for Halloween, it is one night. Let him go and take lots of pictures of his happy face. We limited William to one piece of candy each night after dinner so it wasn't so problematic.

    Good luck and have fun!!!!
     
  14. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    8,719
    My son was 3 when he was diagnosed and one of my biggest fears the day we went to the hospital for training is that he wouldnt be able to eat sweets anymore. I know thats a silly thing to be concerned about at such a time but I wasnt really thinking straight that day;) I learned quickly that he could have sweets in moderation of course as all kids are best with only a small amount of candy at a time. To a very young child just a small piece of candy or a little Dum dums lollipop or a package of Smarties is awesome! That is a perfect little treat, then the rest gets put away for another day. We have candy day at our house. Every Friday after supper the boys are allowed to have 3 small candy items. Steven picks these out before his meal so I can carb count. They both look forward to that night when they can have a little candy to enjoy.

    Your kids are gonna be so cute in their costumes!:)
     
  15. Hayden'sMom

    Hayden'sMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2010
    Messages:
    128
    I was so scared on our first Halloween... 2 weeks after diagnosis... he was so excited and from all the running around, we actually had to "make" him sit down and eat his candy :p

    It will be okay.. and once you get the pump sorted out and get used to it, you will be so happy you chose it!
     
  16. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    My daughter was diagnosed in June, when she was 4. We were still doing shots for our first Halloween. We told her that she could have some candy that night, but it would require a shot. Then for any other candy she would have, it would be incorporated into a lunch shot. We let the girls each pick out about a dozen pieces of candy to have over the next few days. All other candy was traded in for a toy or dress up (that's what's great about Halloween costumes being marked down next day!). We did that for several years. Honestly, my kids after the 3rd or 4th day forgot about the candy!

    Being new to this, it's easy to be overwhelmed. Look at it this way. It is one day out of the year. BG's will be a little crazy, but in the big picture it's ok. It's much more important for your kids to have a normal, happy childhood.

    Oh and save stuff like Skittles, Starburst, Smarties, Lemonheads for lows. They are the perfect size!
     
  17. Butterfly Betty

    Butterfly Betty Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    540
    Sophie just asked me the other day if she'd be able to go trick or treating. I just looked at her and said, "Don't you always?" She shrugged her shoulders, "Yes, but with diabetes, can I really do it?" I said, "Of course, you can. It's not like I'd let you eat all of it on the first night, anyway."

    The point? Let your son be a kid and do all the things kids want to do. Before you know it, he's going to claim to be too old to go trick or treating.
     
  18. Mom2Av

    Mom2Av Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2011
    Messages:
    23
    Our local JDRF chapter is trying to promote, "copper for candy". They are partnering with 2 local tv stations to get get the word out to give kids pennies instead of candy. The kids can then take the pennies to a specific local bank. The bank will roll the coins and donate to jdrf and give the child a special treat. My ds was diagnosed in January and is 10, he doesn't know if he wants to trick or treat or not, as that is for "little kids" he tells me, :):) However, his younger sister says she's going to announce at every door that she wants money, not candy! Not sure how this is going to go over in our neighborhood! :D
     
  19. Tigerlilly's mom

    Tigerlilly's mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,492

    This statement made me smile...:D Isn't it such a great sense of relief when all those initial fears of what our kids "can't" do, never become a reality, but life goes on pretty much as it was before diabetes entered our lives:cwds:

    To the original poster....go trick or treating, have a great time!

    Regarding the pump, lots of members on this board have little ones on the pump and don't seem to have too many pump sites pulled out, so I am sure that shouldn't be too much of an issue. :cwds:
     
  20. thebestnest5

    thebestnest5 Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Messages:
    3,001
    Welcome to the forum.

    I remember the first Halloween after diagnosis. I was so acutely aware of how much candy would be flowing around.:eek:

    But...it's only one night a year, and if you've normally gone trick or treating, then taking that away will hurt.

    It may require one more shot, but it's very do-able to go trick or treating like previous years.

    Our first year after diagnosis of T1, my girl actually had to eat some candy while out trick or treating to prevent lows.

    If I had taken trick or treating away that one night, I could see that disappointing and hurting my kid so much that is would have made diabetes seem even worse for a long time.
     

Share This Page

advertisement