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tips for overnight at grandma`s?

Discussion in 'Grandparents' started by 3js, Jul 5, 2007.

  1. 3js

    3js Approved members

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    my mil has t2, so she has a good understanding of things, and is more than willing to learn. she may come to our a1c, and plans to attend the pumping info when the time comes.

    i pack everything and label it, and my son does his own insulin (she supervises).

    you can`t explain every scenario in one shot, we have figured out- this is where i am looking for tips.

    for instance, she knew he had to have a snack at bedtime, but he was high, so she didn`t make him finish it. afterwards i explained that it is important as it is preventing lows at night. she has experienced lows, and gets it. but her situation is just different.

    i am going to make a chart about when the different insulins peak. any other ideas? or a book that is quite clear? i don`t want her to be freaked out, but i want my son to be covered.

    i also don`t want either of them to miss out on the sleepovers- altho it takes forever to pack all of that food and label it!
     
  2. lynn

    lynn Approved members

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    My son hasn't spent the night at my mother's house yet. She also has t2 and with her it makes it MUCH worse. She doesn't understand the differences. He is a lot younger than your son too.
    Anyway, my daughter was born five months after diagnosis and we were not able to find anyone to keep Nathan while I was at the hospital. So, for the month or so beforehand I trained my two oldest kids on his care--shots, pokies, etc. Your son probably has that down himself.
    I also made a binder with a page for each topic. There was BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, HIGH BLOOD SUGAR, LOW BLOOD SUGAR, WHEN TO CHECK, SNACKS, NIGHT-CHECKS. I think you get the picture. It worked well. We still refer to it when they babysit sometimes and have a question.
    Maybe something like that would work for grandma. Just a simple referral so she doesn't have to call you for every little thing.
     
  3. CAGrandma

    CAGrandma Approved members

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    My suggestion is to keep it simple - easier on everyone. Instead of trying to pack all the food, what about some simple lists that have sample menus that have (for example) 3 different items that each have 15 carbs (plus some protein and fat) for before bedtime and grandma gets to pick any one of the suggested items. But you are the one who makes sure that it has the right number of carbs and includes the protein and fat.

    It is easier for someone to follow instructions that say "he gets 1 unit of insulin for every 15 grams of carbs at lunch or dinner" than to learn when the various insulins peak and how that ratio is determined and modified. Or "if his BG is over ..... call me". Cell phones are invaluable!

    Grandma really doesn't have to know anywhere near as much as you do - she just has to know the big stuff - danger signs, what to do if he goes too low, when to call you, how to count carbs.
     
  4. 3js

    3js Approved members

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    thx both of you for your replies:) i think both of those ideas will help!

    my mil likes me packing the food, but on the last occasion took him for the day at an amusement park. it ended up being a big rush to find a place with pizza for dinner, as that is what we planned for. i don`t pack dinner- i just look up the carbs in advance for whatever restaurant.

    if she had had some options (or if my cell phone had been on:eek:) it would not have been such a panic.
     
  5. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    You're right. Every scenerio is different. When Carson spends the night at grandma's, she calls me almost every time she checks him and I tell her what to do. We leave detailed instructions for what to do at night -- she checks him at 2am just like we do, and she can always call us at 2am if needed. (But she never has had to).

    Keep it simple. Teach how to count carbs, give shots, what to do for a low, etc. But my instructions are usually -- just call me when you check him and I'll tell you what to do.
     
  6. 3js

    3js Approved members

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    brendak, thx for the reply. i`m just starting night time checks tonight. i`m going to get him a watch with an alarm so he can check himself at mil`s (he sleeps on the airmattress in there anyway). she is starting insulin on monday, so that may help. but i think i need to make sure she can get a hold of me- some stuff i think needs to be dealt with as it happens, especially with all of the outings in this heat.
     
  7. nobodybutjustme

    nobodybutjustme Approved members

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    welll, what works at my house is not the most desireable: I have a 15 yo Ddaughter . . . I don't have to wonder too much about how to care for our granddaughter because we have already walked down that road!!! It is a bitter-sweet thing!
     

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