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Time to switch to a pump

Discussion in 'Insulin Pumps' started by MomColbert, May 25, 2013.

  1. MomColbert

    MomColbert New Member

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    May 25, 2013
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    My son was just diagnosed at the beginning of last month. I am so incredibly proud of how well he is doing. :D. I just joined this forum about an hour ago and was reading some posts...ran across one that said their child was diagnosed in January of one year (don't recall) and started using a pump in November of the same year!? Do they normally switch them so quickly? Our endo told us it would be quite awhile but that was when he was first diagnosed and there was no specification as to how long "quite awhile" would be. We are so new to this and I have so much to learn. :confused:
     
  2. ecs1516

    ecs1516 Approved members

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    I think it really depends on the endo and how the parents/child are doing. Back when we were diagnosed 13 years ago we waited a year. That was common then. The endo wants to make sure you understand how to do everything well, giving shots etc. If things go wrong you sometimes have to still give a shot when on the pump. For us, good record keeping of all BG's , food eaten (carbs), and insulin given shows you can keep track of things. With the pump you have more things to make sure of , that the site is changed every 3 days , if high BG's that ketones are checked for etc. With a pump you are more likely to get ketones when a site goes bad because of no long lasting insulin on board.

    How old is your child?
     
  3. miss_behave

    miss_behave Approved members

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    Some kids go on pumps at diagnosis. It all depends on your endo's mind-set. I believe people should be able to pump when they're ready to pump, not after some arbitrary time period has elapsed. It's just another way to deliver insulin.
     
  4. obtainedmist

    obtainedmist Approved members

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    Molly was dx'd early July, and was pumping mid-October. Some insurance companies require 6 months from dx because they mirror the medicare guidelines. We appealed with our doctor's help and lots of bg records...and won! If your doctor won't allow to go get on the pump when you want, I'd start interviewing other practices who will be more willing to work with you. You should either get lots of training from classes offered by the endo's office, or the pump rep. There is nothing mystical about the pump, it's just another learning curve to go through. There are more pieces and parts to deal with and because of that, it might take a bit more problem solving to resolve an issue, but we found that trial and adjustment worked great! And we embraced the phrase, "when in doubt, switch it out" referring to the infusion set, and less frequently, the insulin in the cartridge.
     
  5. cdninct

    cdninct Approved members

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    K started pumping at 5 months. If he had been a bit older he could have left the hospital with one, and we were also given the option at 2 months (but my husband wasn't ready yet).

    I think it is a really personal decision. If you and your son want to pursue pumping, then start doing your research and work with your diabetes team to get the ball rolling (assuming your insurance company is willing to play nice). If you are not interested or not ready, then wait until you are--if ever. The timeline should be driven by your needs and wants, not by some arbitrary schedule.
     
  6. pianoplayer4

    pianoplayer4 Approved members

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    I was told at dx that most insurance companies make you wait 6 months too a year, from what I've read here that's pretty standard.
     
  7. Shopgirl2091

    Shopgirl2091 Approved members

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    Most insurance companies do have a six month waiting period, but with a letter of medical necessity from your doctor they may let it go through. My DS was diagnosed in February, and I have wanted a pump from the get go. Our doctor actually brought it up at our first appointment saying that it would be perfect because he is on such high ratios (1:40 for breakfast). I waited a few more weeks and did my research, then had all the paperwork submitted. Even though we didn't meet all the requirements our insurance company approved it. Now I am just waiting for the DME company to order it.

    I think it really just depends on you and your doctor. Do you feel ready? Do you really want one? If you want it, there should be nothing stopping you. Do your research, get your numbers together, talk to your doctor and go for it.

    Good Luck :)
     
  8. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

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    Hi! I'm new to this site too, but not to diabetes. My daughter was diagnosed at 1 1/2 (She'll be 5 in October) and we waited 3 years to put her on a pump. I didn't feel comfortable with the idea for the longest time. She's been on it for a month now and it definitely has her sugar more under control although the dr said her numbers before the pump were the best we could've done with using injections. It really depends on how you and your child feel about it. Do it when you're ready. I didn't let the dr "talk" me into it and I told her when I felt we were all ready for my daughter to be on the pump. My advice though: Please please please Do NOT use insets that you have to manually insert such as the comfort infusion set even if your dr wants you to have those ones. My daughter absolutely hated it and so did I. It was so frustrating with her being so upset that I was ready to give up on the pump because she was just so upset. We switched to the inset 30 and it is so much better. It's quicker and a lot easier. The inset 30 automatically inserts the cannula with basically the click of a button and you can watch youtube videos to really learn how to do it ( that's what I did)
     
  9. cdninct

    cdninct Approved members

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    This brings up a good point. For us, the manual insertion sets are definitely the best option. Ours is one of the steel sets that goes in like a thumb tack, and DS far prefers them to to anything that requires an inserter. The extra equipment and the "click" freak him out. That is not to say that this poster is wrong, though--different kids simply have different opinions.

    What I'm getting at here is that it is wise to get a whole bunch of different infusion sets and decide which one(s) work best for your child, in terms of comfort and of numbers.
     

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