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Time to Lock the Fridge, Dear

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by kimmcannally, Mar 23, 2011.

  1. kimmcannally

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  2. selketine

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    My older son (does not have D) is now 13 and I thought it was sort of a "joke" that teenage boys eat non-stop but I'm finding out it is true. We wake up to find the results of his snacking - such as the gallon jug of milk left on the counter all night:rolleyes: Well at least that was a healthy snack I guess!:p

    That is a great idea with the lunch box with the carb counts, etc. all set out for him.
     
  3. MTMomma

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    Wow. I had no idea that people locked up refrigerators. I guess I am glad you shared this yet do think there will be quite a bit of reaction posted not not all postive. We are all different and manage the best we can. That being said our entire focus at this house is to try to get our 13 y.o. ready to go out on his own. (The years seem to fly by.)Once he leaves the protection of our "nest" be is going to have to fly on his own, D included. Sometimes it is such a struggle to live with teenagers yet when I get discouraged I try to remember I have a limited time to impress upon them the skills, decision making process and life information they will need. If kids don't have practice in making choices and learning from the outcome of decisions how will they proceed in adulthood? What is your plan for the the future? What will happen when there is not someone to lock the food up? Again, thanks for sharing because it got me thinking and we can all leanr from each other.
     
  4. lynn

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    I think we have to remember that Jackson is autistic. I would venture a guess that Kim will teach him and help him learn to control those nighttime snackings. If he isn't ready to learn it yet then he isn't ready to learn it yet.
     
  5. Lee

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    Yes - you are right - that does make a difference! I was unaware in my earlier post. Maybe some info - not everyone knows the back story.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011
  6. mmgirls

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    I have known of other parents wit childrn without many conditions (well at least not DXd with any) do the very same thing.

    I am sure that the fridge will not be "locked" forever, this is probably the immediate responsce to an immedite need, while other skills are being learnered for all involved.

    Not every living thing is about D, other conditions to consider too, D just makes it more "fun".
     
  7. StacyMM

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    I think it's an easy, usable solution to a situation that needs it. Autism and diabetes are a tough combination and this gives him the power to eat as he chooses and dose himself but keeps him safe. Not something we need in my situation but I can certainly see it's benefits for you! Great job giving him choices, letting him learn and keeping him safe!
     
  8. Mom2Deacon

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    I used to lock up food because of my 2nd oldest son. He cannot have artificial dyes and flavors. I had to buy lock boxes for candy and treating lows because he would sneak into them. I had to resort to it after trying many other options first. He has finally aged out of the sneaking food and the lock boxes haven't been in use for close to a year now.

    --Sara
     
  9. MTMomma

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    Okay, hearing more about the situation helps me to see the reasoning.
     
  10. kimmcannally

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    Yep - that's it in a nutshell. I am teaching him things that I do hope he will be able to use to live on his own. But I am still not sure if he will ever be able to do so - because of autism, not D.

    I really can envision him in 20 years, mad at the world because he has some horrible complication but it's "not my fault!!" Nothing is ever his fault in his mind. He doesn't seem to get the link between his actions and the consequences.
     
  11. JeremysDad

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    I locked up our fridge once...before Jeremy was diabetic. We did it because all of the really nice stuff I would buy disappeared within a few days. Actually it was our second basement fridge that we locked, not the one in the kitchen. The problem is, Jeremy figured out how to open the lock. I guess he really wanted those ice cream bars :)

    At this point, I do not mind what he eats as long as he boluses for it.

    Oh, and to the OP, your A1c's on your blog are phenomenal. I can only wish for something that good.
     
  12. caspi

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    I will stand up and admit that I..... HIDE MY LITTLE DEBBIES BROWNIES!:eek::) It's not because one of my children is diabetic, but because I was tired of looking forward to eating something, only to go to the pantry to find out it had been eaten. I live in a house with a teen, almost-teen and husband that eats like a teen. :D
     
  13. kimmcannally

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    Thank you for the A1c compliment! I work hard for those :D
    LOL, yes I locked up my chocolate before J was dx too. Same problem - I would be all ready for a chocolate snack, go to get it and find an empty box! Urgh!
    And I don't mind J eating what he wants, but he will eat all. night. long. just to keep himself awake (that's what I think, anyway). And he is already heavy due to being on Abilify. He doesn't need to add anything else to it.
    We had a plastic "pantry" that I locked, but he broke the plastic to get into it, so I had to resort to those locks you see on the fridge and of course, a lock on the pantry door. The great thing about the fridge locks is the numbers can be set. So every few days I change them to keep him from figuring out what they are :)
     

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