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Thyroid Inflamination and AC1/A1C

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by diabeticgirl101, May 17, 2006.

  1. diabeticgirl101

    diabeticgirl101 Approved members

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    Hi I have thyroid inflamination and don't know anything about it. The doctor didn't tell me what it meant- just that I needed bloodwork. :eek: Can somebody who has/had it tell me about it and if you feel pain? Also where is your thyroid? any info would help

    also my AC1 (or is it) A1C is 9.4 %. Any ideas of how to get it down? Do you just eat right and not have highs too often? My orignal A1C/AC1 in the hosptial when I got it was 11%!! then I had a 7.2 % and now 9.4%.
     
  2. EmmasMom

    EmmasMom Approved members

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    Hi Lauren,
    Your thyroid is located in the front of your neck, just a few inches below your chin. If you lean your head back and swallow you may be able to feel it. I'm no thyroid expert, but I do know that your thyroid can grow if it's having a hard time producing the right amount TSH. They will probably do blood tests to confirm what your TSH levels are. Several members of my family have thyroid problems they all manage it with oral medication.

    I'm sorry to hear that your A1C has gone up. Did your endo give you any advice on bringing it back down? Are you on a pump or injections? There are a lot of things that can help, but it mostly depends on your insulin dosing. A healthy diet and exercise is always good, but if your not taking enough insulin neither will fix the problem. You should ask your doctors office about meeting with a diabetes educator that can help you out.

    Good Luck!:)
     
  3. cydnimom

    cydnimom Approved members

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    Lauren,

    The Thyroid is located right around your voice box. When the doctor feels your neck, they usually press firmly and ask you to swallow and thats how they usually tell if its swollen. They will usually do bloodwork to see what your hormone levels are at as well to see if there are any antibodies present. Some forms of thyroid problems are autoimmune just like diabetes. I know quite a few women who have diabetes as well as hypothyroidism.

    Your elevated A1c is showing that you have high blood glucose for extended periods of time. If you can get you blood sugar on more of an even keel it should come down. The trick I have found is to catch the highs quickly and treat them rather than leaving them to your next scheduled shot. By that I mean if I eat something out of the ordinary I will check my bs 2-3 hours after eating to see if I dosed correctly rather than waiting my usual 4-6 hours.

    I'm not sure what insulin regime you are on and if you carb count or not, but carb counting can sure help a lot if you are taking Humalog/Novorapid on a carb ratio basis (along with your Lantus/Levemir) NPH is a bit trickier.

    Another thing I have noticed over the years is that keeping a log can sure help you figure things out when you are looking for a trend. I pretty much keep to a consistent diet with respect to how many servings of each food group. Of course there are times when you really want a treat. If I deviate from my meal plan I will make a note of it in my book, so I know how I changed my dose to see if I actually did it right or if changes need to be made the next time I eat it. Pizza took me awhile to figure out how to dose it and so did icecream.

    Sometimes it can seem like an overwhelming and cumbersome job to do all the time, but after awhile it just becomes habit. Sometimes its easier to start out small - so if there is a certain time of day you seem to have trouble with the most - then pay attention to that specific time of day and log what you eat to find a trend and move on from there.

    If I can help you in anyway with respect to logging or carb counting let me know.
     
  4. diabeticgirl101

    diabeticgirl101 Approved members

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    She gave me no advice on bringing it down. I'm on insulin.
     
  5. diabeticgirl101

    diabeticgirl101 Approved members

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    Thanks! I'll let you know if I need help. :) Sometimes it's just nice to be able to talk to people who know about stuff like this. :) Thanks so much!!


    Thanks to everyone who replied!! :)
     
  6. maverickmom (Kerri)

    maverickmom (Kerri) Approved members

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    Once your thyroid problem is under control, your diabetes will be better controlled, and your A1c will come down...
     
  7. JasonJayhawk

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    Diabeticgirl,
    Did you get your thyroid results back yet?

    Sometimes, when a person is hypothyroid, their thyroid will attempt to do more work -- hence become enlarged.
     
  8. nantomsuethom

    nantomsuethom Approved members

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    Hi Lauren,
    Thyroid inflamation does not hurt. I was diagnosed with hypothyroid when I was 12. Once your blood work comes back your doctor will decide whether you need medication or not. If you thyroid is enlarged you probably do.
    Thomas has to have his blood work done for his thyroid this week too.
    You probably know how to bring your A1c down but at your age (same as Thomas) it is very hard at times to keep your blood sugar in range. His endo told him the other day to try but not to sweat it. Hormones, growth spurts and emotions with have your bg all over the place. Cutting out the extra snacks (if you eat them) helps. I try to help Thomas with that but his friends houses have snacks and if they are eating them I will not have him sit there and watch. Thats one of the nice things about the pump - extra insulin - no extra shots.
    Good luck!!:)
     

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