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thoughts on a Jack Russell Terrier puppy for Ali

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by payam7777777, Jan 5, 2012.

  1. payam7777777

    payam7777777 Approved members

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    So, I'm kinda about to / inclined to get a Jack Russel Terrier for Ali (he's 8 now) and I could use any feedback at all. :)
     
  2. LizinTX

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    All I know is that they are very high energy dogs. Also, I think kids and animals should go together, however, be prepared to do the lion's share of care once the novelty wears off. Make sure your lifestyle matches that of the breed you are getting. :)
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Terriers are wonderful dogs.:cwds: I've loved a few. But, they are smart, demanding, calculating, and fearless. They are hard wired to investigate, problem solve and to alert. That's wonderful in the wild, but at home they can be hyper, noisy and destructive.

    Is the JR the dog of choice for looks? Size? Availability?

    Are you thinking of a JR as a DAD?
     
  4. C6H12O6

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  5. Ali

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    The above is what I know about the breed also. Good luck. We have two dogs, active Aussies! We love our dogs but they are work. Ali
     
  6. Lee

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    I grew up around JRT's and they are everything Sarah says - also, they form a one-person attachment, which is good if it is your nephew, but not so good if it isn't. They take a TON of energy and are a bit hard to train thanks to their stubbornness.

    Honestly, as much as I hate to dash your hopes, another breed would probably be better for your nephew. They are not the most kid friendly breed. But they are wonderful and I am sure if you give the puppy a good home, it will fit in well with your family.
     
  7. TheTestingMom

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    I agree.
    Honestly, my recommendation is a poodle, be it a standard size or toy size or in between. They are very very smart, considered second smartest only to the border collie. They are easy to train and love being part of the family. Believe it or not they are sturdy dogs originally bred to hunt. My only complaint is that have to have their hair cut and that can be expensive. I pay about 40.00 for our 4 pound toy poodle's cut. Our's get a "pet cut" one length all over. We love our lil girl, she's loves to cuddle and sleeps with DS every night.
     
  8. Bigbluefrog

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    My cousin adopted a Jack Russell Terrier. She has a two year old and they are doing well. It is all about the time you put in on training them. Expect puppy chewing and be prepared with a variety of chew toys. I switch them out daily so its a new item and new experience.

    Walks can calm dogs down...that is the dog whisper's advice...long walks to calm them and wear out excessive energy.

    Crate training for your sanity and the puppies protection.

    I just got a border collie mix and she is only 9 weeks old and we are spending a minimum of an hour in the morning and again at night training her.

    I am hoping she can be a DAD or a therapy dog, but will not be disappointed if she is just a family pet. Very smart, she can sit, fetch, drop, lay down, and I am working on smells of hyper glycemia. All I do is feed her food from a dish with the scent. I only feed her from a scented dish and all day long. repeat repeat, and repeat. After a few weeks I will try to add other things, like alert, signal, and bringing the bg bag.

    Its only been a week and she is eager to learn. I am excited to start dog classes too, more for socializing and learning more techniques.

    Good luck with your new puppy! I look forward to hearing about your new puppy adventures.
     
  9. ashtensmom

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    I have personally owned two JRTs. They both had very different personalities. My first one was a "short-legged" one (purebred) he's was my baby. Beautiful personality, loving, and very smart. He was also very easy to train, almost too easy. Then, we got a second JRT, a female to keep him company. She was more the typical hyper JRT and very dominate. Picked fights with him and bullied him. Having said that, she was a wonderfully loyal dog as well. Also very smart and easy to train. However, we had to adopt her out shortly after our DD was born as she was so loyal to me that she couldn't stand the attention my DD was getting and we feared her biting our daughter. Plus, no walks = behaviour problems. She didn't destroy the house, rather she destroyed herself (obsessive licking of fur). Anyway, what I am trying to say there can still be differences within one breed of dog, as our one JRT is a sweetie. Best dog we could ever ask for, and the 2nd, although a great dog, she just didn't fit into our lifestyle.

    They shed like crazy though and their needle-like fur get weaved into everything and is hard to remove.

    As far as trainabilty goes, easy peasy, super smart. I think they can do anything if taught right.
     
  10. OSUMom

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    I agree. Many years ago we had an extremely challenging JRT. They are the cutest things but such high energy I think farms are great environments for them. Do you live on a farm? :D
     
  11. Wendy12571

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    I personally own two JRT's. I have had a total of 3. They are great dogs but very demanding. I love them dearly but they are a very challenging dog.
    Wendy
     
  12. payam7777777

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    Okay, Confession time!: ;-)

    one of the main reasons i'm opting for JRT is based on what i read/watched on the web, and i did read/watch a lot, JRTs seem to be like the healthiest/sturdiest dog ever when it comes to doggy health issues like hip displasia/bloat/eye problems. and ending up with an ill dog a few years down the road when there's a good bond between Ali and the dog is frankly the last thing i'd wish for.

    i am aware of the fact that JRT is a 'hyper' dog and not really very suitable for Ali's apartment+small yard lifestyle.

    i'm hoping with lots of training done by me after having educated myself greatly about training, he'll enjoy a rather obedient dog that'll hopefully bring the much needed exercise/companionship into Ali's life.

    again, the top notch health of JRTs here is my main drive (i guess!) to get one.

    pardon my being/looking so quintessential ever-adamant Payam!

    Yet, please do let me have your advice. :cwds:
     
  13. Lee

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    I have two standard poodles - they also have decent health records and I have to say - I love them. They are incredibly smart, pretty easy to train, and pretty destructive to anything left on the floor for the first year.

    They are great - when you want to play, they will play, when you want to mellow, they will mellow, and when you want to cuddle, they cuddle. Plus no allergies.

    The added bonus is Max will alert Coco when high or low - not like a trained alert dog, but he will bark at her when she is on the trampoline and going low or when she is really high. He won't leave her side until she is back in range. Does he do it 100% of the time - no - but he does it enough to not be a coincidence.

    They are good apartment dogs - they just need to run a lot to let off steam. They are perfect with kids - love and adore them. They play with them, let them dress them up, play fetch, etc, etc, etc. I have to say - I really love my poodles!
    View attachment 2640

    Not your girly poodle - although he does like having his nails polished!
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2012
  14. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    My healthiest dogs have always been mutts ;)


    Good luck. Hope you find the perfect dog.:cwds:
     
  15. zoomom456

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    JRT are known for having allergy issues. Some literally scratch themselves raw and devlop secondary bacterial infections. There is an inherited condition known as Lens luxation where a ligament fiber doesn't hold the lens in place. Treatment ranges from eye drops to eye removal. All little breeds are prone to patellar luxation - the knee cap pops out of place. JRT is no exception. Any hyper breed that is known for being active is. prone to cranial cruciate ligament tearing. This is basically a torn ACL for people. Common breeds are labs, goldens, springers, aussies, border collies and JRT. JRT may be obsessive compulsive - some literally cannot stop playing fetch. Terriers are known for digging, the yard and sometimes the couch. Terriers can also be destructive when bored.

    Being bluntly honest - JRT need tons of training and usually the best ones I see spent time with a licensed qualified dog trainer. Socialization is imperative for this breed since they can become bullies. Exercise - you would need a minimum of 2-3 hour long walks in a day plus games at home. If you are looking at this dog living in a small apartment, I would look for a different breed or a small mutt. The most heartbreaking thing to see is a family trying to rehome a dog with issues that they unknowingly caused, or worse making a dog such a nutcase there is no other option than to euthanize the animal.

    Just as FYI, I love JRT. The personality and vivacious attitudes can not be beat. My best friend has one that is great. However she goes hiking in the mountains with him about 3 times a week, spends one hour sessions at the dog park a day, and goes on 2 - 2 mile walks every day. She also plays games around the house and the back yard. It is a really good thing she works from home because I don't see how she could have a conventional job with her dog's schedule. If you and Ali can commit to this level of exercise, attention and care - then you could have a great dog.
     
  16. Lee

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    I also wanted to add since you are going to be the one doing the bulk of the training, the JRT will become more loyal to you and less loyal to your nephew - they are typically a one person dog.
     
  17. Mommy For Life

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    Not sure if this thread is turning into a vote for breeds :rolleyes: ..but I have to say we LOVE our labradoodle! She is super smart, doesn't shed, loves to hang with the kids, enjoys car rides and walks! Ironically, we got Ebony about 4 months prior to Olivia's dx...one of her littermates was donated by the breeder to a local JDRF silent auction! :cwds:
     
  18. Illinifan

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    I have a 9 year old Jack Russell Terrorist. She is a sweetheart, but can be a handful at times (like when the pizza man rings the doorbell).

    I'll agree with other people's assessment that JRTs tend to lock on to one person.

    If Ali is going to be the one who trains the dog and is with the dog the most, then she could end up with an excellent pet. If someone else is going to be doing the work, then the JRT will bond with them and there's a real probability that Ali will feel like someone "stole" her dog.

    The allergy thing...Kenai is allergic to something in Ohio that blooms in late Aug/early Sep. She licks her legs raw. No amount of pre- or post- treatment works for her. She just has pink legs for a couple of months. Something to consider.
     
  19. Bigbluefrog

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    Sounds like you are being smart about this and are doing your homework. I didn't know that about JRT. I just remember watching Fraizer and the dog was smart. MY cousin's dog was a puppy at the time, so it will be interesting to see what happened when her dog matured and if it bonded with one person.

    I guess I prefer mix breeds, got to love those mutts. Our last mixed dog was very healthy and lived to be 17.
     

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