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The battery sensor in the Navigator is almost worthless

Discussion in 'Continuous Glucose Sensing' started by ecs1516, Apr 11, 2009.

  1. ecs1516

    ecs1516 Approved members

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    I had a problem last week with a receiver and it had a battery status if 50-75% at a restart. The next day it was went to a 0-25% and died hours later.

    Last night on my other sons system the transmitter said 25-50%. I usually would change them but I only wanted it to run two more days then do a brand new sensor. Less than 15 minutes after the restart the transmitter battery(Energizer) just flat out died. I guess it just skipped the 0-25%?:confused:
     
  2. Nancy in VA

    Nancy in VA Approved members

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    Our nurse told us to change at the 25-50% mark - I guess they've had the same experience, but that doesn't explain the receiver.

    Of course, for us, we hit the daggone backlight button so much I'm sure we're gonna burn through batteries.
     
  3. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    I haven't had trouble w/the receiver batteries yet, but I'm noticing that the transmittor batteries automatically go down on the battery life every 10 days. That's really disappointing they don't have a real battery life indicator.
     
  4. Twinklet

    Twinklet Approved members

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    It IS worthless! During the study, we were told that the battery indicator only tells you how long a battery has been in place, not really how much charge is left. If you put in a USED battery, it will read 75-100%, even if most of it's life is gone! For this reason, we were told to change the battery every time it's below 75-100%, which meant every other site change for us. :mad:
     
  5. Melissata

    Melissata Approved members

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    Nancy, I wouldn't even trust it that far, especially if you are using the light a lot. We don't use it at all, and already had both batteries die out early. I might chance it if you just changed to 25-50%, but not if it has been saying that for any length of time. It just isn't worth it.
     
  6. moco89

    moco89 Approved members

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    Yeah, when it reaches the 25-50% mark during a sensor wearing session, I always change the batteries out when I do my next change. It's not worth the risk, or the 10 hour warmup.

    You can thank the electrical engineers for screwing up the battery life and "charge" algorithm. :rolleyes::(

    Also, if they used a better algorithm, we wouldn't be "restricted" to using just energizer batteries. Well, I really don't it makes a difference because the battery life is way off anyways. It's disappointing.

    It's kind of ironic that my pump never has battery issues like this, while this thing you have to keep an eye on-and possibly expect the sensor to end.

    But hey, Happy Easter!
     
  7. moco89

    moco89 Approved members

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    So bascially Abbott knew it was a problem, and never fixed it before it reached the public. Nice.
     
  8. Nancy in VA

    Nancy in VA Approved members

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    Yeah, my nurse had told us 15 days, and at 15 days from the beginning, we were at 25-50% on both so I did a battery change when I did a sensor restart
     
  9. buggle

    buggle Approved members

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    We've always had issues with transmitter batteries. They can be showing 75-100% and then suddenly die with no warning. I called to try to find out if our transmitter was faulty and decided to hold on to ours since it works so well. We got a package from Abbott with 3 transmitter batteries. :rolleyes: They sure know how to waste money. If they'd design it right from the beginning, then they wouldn't have to spend so much money on replacing everything.

    We had to restart last night and we changed receiver batteries while it was still going to see if we could change without losing the sensor. Hubby did it one battery at a time and as quickly as possible and it never lost the reading. So, it was successful. Of course, if we tried this when we needed it to work, I bet we'd lose the sensor. But it shows that it *can* work. You just have to do it before the battery dies, obviously.
     
  10. ecs1516

    ecs1516 Approved members

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    Yes, we ALWAYS change the battery when it reaches the 25-50% mark except this time I only needed the two days. Thought it could make it.:confused: Fat chance. Also our receiver died the other day and it was at 50-75% the day before on sensor insertion!!! THe worst thing about that one it died during the night and all you could hear was a very faint beep.
     

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