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The Babysitters Club

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by LucyAmber, Jun 20, 2013.

  1. LucyAmber

    LucyAmber Approved members

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    So I found out like 3 days ago that in 1990 that they made a tv series based on the books by Ann M. Martin's series "The Babysitters Club" it only ran for 1 season :(

    I LOVED these books when I was younger and owned many of them, what I didn't own I checked out from at the library. My favorite person was Stacey's character, because she was a T1D :)

    But as I was watching episode 5, it is set around christmas time, and in this episode, it is said that stacey shouldn't eat sweets :( you see her sneaking a cookie, later having a headache, then eating a brownie and drinking a glass of water in seconds.
    And later, she is admitted to the hospital for hyperglycemia.

    Now, I know that in 1990 things where different, but didn't people have MDI then? Or an extra injection for a sweet treat?

    It just seems to have the stigma of "diabetics have to have a special diet" to it.

    Or maybe its just me.... Anyone else read the BSC books?
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2013
  2. Brenda

    Brenda Junior Member

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    When our daughter was diagnosed in 1989, we were told not to feed her any foods with "concentrated sugars." So, this would include sugary cereals, cookies, dried fruit. She was on Regular and NPH. Unless her blood sugar were low, we would have to dose her pre-breakfast and pre-dinner insulin ONE HOUR before meals to try to match the insulin with the food. We were not taught to give additional injections for treats. We based her doses on a sliding scale (100-150, .5 units R, 150-200, 1 unit R, etc.--just examples, not her doses). Essentially, you gave insulin to cover breakfast. As it peaked, you would need a snack. Then, you'd eat lunch (no extra insulin), eat a second snack as the NPH peaked (2-3 p.m.), dose for dinner, eat dinner, have a snack around 8 p.m., maybe check at 2 a.m. when NPH was peaking again. Even if you did not want a snack, you needed to eat one. Sick days were the worst. You'd have all kinds of insulin on board.

    This sort of works for some people. We had no choice. It was all we knew about. No Internet then to research options (then we could have used less peaking Lente or Ultralente as long acting insulins, but we did not know about them).

    Humalog and NovoLog did not exist until the late 90's. Both start working about 20 min. after injecting/bolusing so you do not have to wait an hour to eat. Imagine being high yet feeling very hungry but needing to wait an hour to eat! It was awful many times.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

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    23 year old fiction. I wouldn't bother being bothered
     
  4. MomofSweetOne

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    My daughter read one right after diagnosis when she wanted books about kids with diabetes. Unfortunately, most had kids going into comas as their climax, and she would literally turn pale reading them. It's hard to find realistic fiction about diabetes. Chris Fabry's RPM series is one that has diabetes included realistically - but then, they also live with it.
     
  5. cdninct

    cdninct Approved members

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    All I knew about diabetes for years came from reading about Stacey eating her crackers at meetings! Just before K was born, so 2-3 years before he was diagnosed, I worked with a man with t1d and I admit to judging him horribly for the way he totally failed to adhere to any sort of a meal plan and ate whatever he wanted whenever he wanted to. I was convinced he was a "bad diabetic" (although, to be fair, knowing what I know now, I still think he did a pretty poor job of diabetes management but for different reasons).

    I think the books were great for their time, but they definitely reflected the late '80s and early '90s, and I don't think that I would ever let a CWD read them now unless we used the books as a springboard for discussion.

    And, FWIW, even 2.5 years ago when we started on NPH we were taught to adhere to a pre-set meal plan and were given no instructions for dealing with special treats, etc. I'm sure if we hadn't started pumping early on, I would have figured out how to do it for myself, but there are definitely still people out there who have some variety of a "diabetic diet"!
     
  6. cdninct

    cdninct Approved members

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    Oh, and I'm sure that even in 2010 we were not the only family out there that left the hospital with a copy of Even Little Kids Get Diabetes (published in 1991), in which the little girl who narrates the story tells us, "I have to eat the right foods at the right times. I don't ever eat candy or ice cream or cake, not even on Halloween or at birthday parties!" Even now I get emotional looking at the cover with her sitting at a birthday party eating her apple while the other kids eat cake and ice cream!
     
  7. Northwoodsmama

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    We were given this book *3* months ago!! I took a marker to that line :)
     
  8. LucyAmber

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    Thanks Brenda for explaining how D-treatment was in the early 90's.

    I agree that the books reflect that time period.
     
  9. sarahspins

    sarahspins Approved members

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    MDI didn't really become mainstream until Humalog came out in the mid/late 90's. Lantus in 2001 was a game changer.
     

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