- advertisement -

Thank goodness there was a nurse at this school

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Becky Stevens mom, May 20, 2010.

  1. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    8,719
    http://www.shelbycountyreporter.com/news/2010/may/20/kcs-nurse-acts-save-diabetic-student/

    ALABASTER When a diabetic student came into Kingwood Christian School nurse Leslie Bowen?s office May 19, she knew exactly how to handle the situation.

    The student, who was complaining of low blood sugar, was not feeling well, so Bowen gave him something to eat to get his sugar levels back up.

    But within a few minutes, the situation turned dire, and Bowen stepped in to save the boy from going into a diabetic coma.

    As the boy began to have seizures, Bowen placed him on a cot to keep him from injuring himself.

    Within seconds, the boy began to lose consciousness and his breathing nearly stopped.

    He was unresponsive, Bowen said.He was almost to the point of not being able to breathe. He was in a full-blown seizure.

    Realizing the boy was in severe danger, Bowen gave his a glucagon shot, which immediately began to regulate his sugar levels.

    Within seconds, the boy began to breathe easier and started coming out of the seizure.

    He slowly, slowly regained consciousness,? Bowen said. His body responded very well.

    Bowen stayed in contact with the boy?s parents and his primary physician during the ordeal, and he was eventually able to go home, where Bowen said he has fully recovered.

    Bowen said had she not been able to give the boy the glucagon shot, the situation could have had a much worse outcome.

    If left untreated, he could have slipped into a coma or died, Bowen said.

    KCS Education Pastor Benny Cunningham praised Bowen for her actions.

    When she saw he was having a seizure, she knew what to do immediately, Cunningham said. She knew exactly what to do. A much bigger incident could have happened.

    Several years ago, Cunningham said the school decided to work a full-time nurse into the budget, and that decision paid off Wednesday.

    She's a vital part of what we do here, Cunningham said. We couldn't do what we do without her, and she puts families at ease knowing their children are safe here at Kingwood.




    This article proves a very important point. We need to have nurses in ALL schools ALL the time. Especially if the laws are going to keep being written where only an RN can administer Glucagon. I feel sick thinking of what the outcome could have been if a nurse hadnt been here for this child.
     
  2. sooz

    sooz Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2009
    Messages:
    2,330
    Such an important point! Im glad everything turned out ok!
     
  3. Gomod71

    Gomod71 Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2007
    Messages:
    315
    Printing this out for my meeting with the district on Wednesday!
     
  4. sam1nat2

    sam1nat2 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2007
    Messages:
    4,546
    just playing devil's advocate here, but how do you expect to have a nurse at school all the time, yet also have them on all field trips? By you, I mean people in general, not Becky.

    We have 7 D kids at school and no nurse, there is not a single class with 2 d kids. If I expected a nurse to go with him as did other parents, then who would be there?

    My point is that nurses aren't the answer, but rather there needs to be a way to train people who work with kids on how to use the glucagon. In my opinion it is similar to an Epi pen in that it is a "rescue" drug and I know we have plenty of kids at schools on epi pens and that aids are trained in how to use them, why not glucagon?
     
  5. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    8,719
    Oh I absolutely agree Analisa! Yes a matter of fact Im not sure if you saw my other post about this very subject. In CT at this time only RNs are allowed to administer glucagon. My friend and I are speaking to state representatives to try and get this overturned. We need to gather evidence that first and foremost calling 911 when a child is seizing is NOT an acceptable accommodation and that someone needs to be at the school should a child have a seizure or become unconcious due to severe hypo. Before I heard about this law I was in the process of training 3 people at our school to administer glucagon. Its not something that anyone could screw up IMO, you put the liquid in the powder, mix it up and give em a poke. As my friend said. Not doing something is much worse then giving the injection. At the very least I would like to be assured that The good samaritan law would be able to be utilized in a case like this. Right now staff members are scared witless that if they give the shot of glucagon and the law states that only an RN can give it then they will lose their job and thats plain wrong! So if thats the way that these states want to mess with us then we will have to show them how stupid it really is. If its true that an RN has to be there at all school functions then kids that stay after for activities have the right to a nurse present. That would break many schools already weak budgets
     
  6. Gomod71

    Gomod71 Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2007
    Messages:
    315
    Becky and I both live in CT where the state law says ONLY a registered nurse can administer Glucagon. (Yet anyone can use an EPI pen)

    In my school's case, we have over 500 kids in one school and often there is no nurse. She has a horrible attendance record, and when she's not there we most times have no substitute (sub is usually an EMT, not even a paramedic), which leaves the principal in charge.

    Frightening to think our children cannot receive a life saving shot if they need it. :eek:
     
  7. sam1nat2

    sam1nat2 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2007
    Messages:
    4,546
    another thing to consider would be to see if its possible (and I have noooo clue) to have glucagon as an autoinjector like epi??
    Would that take the fear out?
    Not like epi is that safe and kids needing that only need it in life threatening situations.

    Hate how litigious our society has become. I can see people being scared of giving insulin, but glucagon won't hurt them while an over dose of insulin can!
     
  8. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    8,719
    Yep thats exactly right! I want to get endos saying this and maybe we can start getting some of these aniquated laws changed. I was wondering why staff is allowed to administer epinephrine now and feel sick at that the thought that maybe a child died while waiting for emergency help to arrive:(
     
  9. speakup4kids

    speakup4kids Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2007
    Messages:
    173
    This drives me absolutely crazy... I wish people were better educated about glucagon and how little risk there is associated with its use. I find it ironic that there is little resistance to staff giving epipen shots, which actually can cause problems if given to certain people(myself included) yet at the mere thought of saving a diabetics life with glucagon, a shot that will not harm anyone even if mistakenly given, people absolutely go crazy with resistance. What is it about diabetes that makes people lose their ability to use common sense?
     
  10. Heather(CA)

    Heather(CA) Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    Messages:
    10,153
    OK< you know I love you but if this report was accurate....The nurse did NOT handle it well. She should have given him liquid carbs, not food. It's possible that if she had given him juices and tested him to know he needed more than one, instead of food which is too slow to treat lows...The glucagon may not have been necessary at all. :( Poor little guy.
     
  11. susan

    susan Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,101
    This happened not far from me..In Alabama we don't have the same law about glucagon and an RN..Our school nurse is only an LPN and she would be allowed to give Davis glucagon if needed..
     
  12. susan

    susan Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,101
    I just talked to our school nurse..In Alabama the law states that there has to be a full time licensed nurse, lpn or rn, if there is a student with a glucagon order or an order for a specific seizure drug ( I can't remember the name of it)..At our school there are 2 glucagon orders and 1 for the other..The law also states that any licensed nurse can administer glucagon..Finally, Alabama isn't the worst at something;)
     
  13. MHoskins2179

    MHoskins2179 Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Messages:
    494
    Changed times

    It is scary, but it also shows how times have changed - back in my school days in the mid-80s and early 90s, I was the first and only D-Kid. No nurses, and no one knew what to do. My mom and I had to teach them. But these days, laws and society are different. Schools are legally restricted in so many more ways - such as the example of parents suing because their kid played kickball and fell down, and wasn't being specifically "watched" at that moment in time. Or kids being pulled from recess or gym class. It's just a different world, one that no actually dictates the need for school nurses but won't offer the resources to pay for what it requires. See the irony here? So you know, this comes from an adult Type 1 without any kids at the moment.
     
  14. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    Is that true? My understanding was that something like glucose tabs are faster than juice to bring up lows. We find juice fairly slow, but YDMV. :cwds:
     
  15. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    8,719
    I was wondering that myself, what they fed this boy. If it was tabs then that would be ok or cake icing if he couldnt chew the tabs . Im also wondering if the parents had forgotten to provide juice. Reminds me, Ive gotta make sure the school has some of Stevens white grape juice;)
     
  16. Heather(CA)

    Heather(CA) Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    Messages:
    10,153
    I think tabs are faster than juice, if he was that low I don't know that I would want him to have something choking size in his mouth...But, if he was capable that would have worked too. My point wasn't about glucose tabs though. It was that food was the wrong thing to give him. If he was given tabs that's totally different. I don't think of tabs as food. I should have said or some other fastacting carbs like tabs. Juice works fine for us, ydmv:cwds:

    It IS true that food is too slow however, too slow for lows that are dropping...

    Are you trying to pick a fight with me today???;):D Just teasing lol

    Becky, I totally get why you want a nurse, I support you 100%. In my experience though, the nurse's know a lot less than the health clerk that is there every day. That's just our situation though...If the nurse was there every day, that would probably change:cwds:
     
  17. MamaChrissa

    MamaChrissa Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Messages:
    770
    Thats exactly what I was thinking. Also, I did not see if they actualy tested him in the article. Knowing the actual number could have easily sent the nurse directly to the Glucogon and not PO carbs. :eek:
     
  18. ShanaB

    ShanaB Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2009
    Messages:
    900
    I started a thread last week about lobbying Lilly to change the design of Glucagon to make it more like an EpiPen -- wrote a letter this week and waiting on response.

    In Ontario, unless you are the rare exception no one is trained in Glucagon -- only thing they will do is call 911. The argument is the mixing and the needle. It's not right but because we don't have school nurses unless we get legislation in place or the Ministry changes their policy then schools will not administer Glucagon. We do have a Province wide policy that trains all teachers on the use of an EpiPen.

    Working hard in getting this changed but these stories make us all cringe and fear for the safety of our kids. We also do not have any school personnel assisting with management for younger children. The argument could be made with frequent testing Glucagon should never be required -- unfortunately that isn't happening either. Sigh.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice