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Testing Toes

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by wearingtaci, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. wearingtaci

    wearingtaci Approved members

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    I swear I saw someone say they test toes at night. Is that something that can be done instead of fingers,like at night? Sophie is a tummy sleeper and she curls her hands under her,so I have to roll her over(waking her up)to test at night
     
  2. Lakeman

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    yes you can test toes. We tried it just the once and she hated it. (she was awake)
     
  3. KellersMom517

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    Just make sure you clean them really good! DH tested DS once on the toes and got a BG well into the 300s...I wasn't expecting that, did a retest on his finger and it was 185 or something. A liiiitttle better. lol
     
  4. C6H12O6

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    Yes you can it is a digit just like a finger. So it does not have any of the disadvantages of alternate site testing.
     
  5. LoveMyHounds

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    Aren't toes more sensitive than fingers?
     
  6. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    Toes are great. They do need to be clean.
    They are not more sensitive than fingers. They do have a higher infection risk than fingers.
     
  7. Debdebdebby13

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    We use toes all the time, particularly at night. DD prefers to use her fingers when she is testing herself, but prefers other people check on her toes. She says toes hurt less when other people are doing it, other people hurt her fingers.
     
  8. MomofSweetOne

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    We've never tried toes, but I have wondered whether the risk of infection in a lower extremity is a greater concern? I had to take my daughter to a podiatrist for a non-D issue this summer, and the podiatrist told us we were to be checking her feet nightly for sores. Yeah, right.:rolleyes: If she thought we're adding one more thing onto managing D through puberty, she was sadly mistaken.
     
  9. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    My CDE and doctor gave me the okay to test on toes for three years following diagnosis, with the agreement that I'd stop if I flunked any neuropathy tests annually after that. I flunked the very first neuropathy test (can't tell when the vibrations stop), and was very very sad about leaving the toes alone. I still test one occasionally.
     
  10. Christopher

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    No, I don't think there is a greater risk of infection with the lower extremities (in someone who is not showing signs of neuropathy).

    As for the podiatrist, while her heart may be in the right place, her head is lodged somewhere else completely. :D

    It is a pet peeve of mine when people mistakenly assume that kids with Type 1 automatically need to be careful with their feet, going barefoot, etc. The only time that is necessary is, as Jonah pointed out, there are signs of neuropathy and you may injure your foot and not realize it due to lack of feeling, and so the injury goes untreated and gets infected.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2013
  11. Lisa - Aidan's mom

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    Only tried it once and he hated it.
     
  12. wearingtaci

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    I tried it last night. Her big toe bled a lot better then her fingers,but she didn't like it much
     
  13. shannong

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    My son hated it too. He tends to curl his fingers when he is sleeping too, but I think he is so used to testing while he is sleeping that I just uncurl them and if he resists, I will tell him gently that I need to do a blood check.

    I'm not sure which is more accurate - toes or fingers, because I did compare them a few times and would get different results.
     
  14. Cookie Monster

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    When our son was first diagnosed his fingers were so tiny it was impractical to even attempt finger pricks so initially we used heels then moved on to the big toe. We never had an issue and five years later we still use toes at night simply because there's less chance of waking him. We have never had a problem with infections on his toes.
     
  15. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    The issue with neuropathy is not merely lack of feeling. If you have neuropathy and injure yourself in the area with neuropathy, it's not just your brain that doesn't register it correctly. Your body doesn't send the same immune response that it would otherwise. Also, neuropathy and reduced circulation (which is a very major risk for infection) go together.

    I don't have lack of feeling in my feet, except in that I don't have a good sense of vibration. I pass the pinprick test. I certainly can feel it when I lance my toe.
     
  16. Lee

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    We are nighttime toe testers here. We have been doing it for 8 years and have often compared toe readings to fingers and have found them to be within the 20+/-% of meters.

    We started testing toes the first year because she was loosing so much sleep.
     

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