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Testing in School

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by karliesmom, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. karliesmom

    karliesmom Approved members

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    I just found out from our school nurse that it is "District Policy" that children with diabetes can not test in the classroom...that a 504 won't even help with this. They just plain do not allow testing anywhere other than in the nurses office....and this goes through the 12th grade.

    My daughter just started third grade so this is not an issue at this point. I do not think she is ready to self-manage quite yet. But, in the future I know she will be able to and will want to and I will back her whatever her decision is.

    I am somewhat familiar with the laws protecting our kids and thought with a 504 she could test when and where she needed. The school CNA (who is awesome to work with) was told by the district head nurse that no way no how can Karlie test in the classroom...504 or not. What??!!

    Am I missing something or is the district right in this case? Can a public school district override Federal Law? I have a feeling they are not and can't and may be looking at a good fight with them in the next year.

    Any help or information would be greatly appreciated!!:)
    Kim
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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  3. Christopher

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    I would definitely challenge this. It sounds like it is less "policy" and more just something the nurse decided. You may want to start by asking them what rationale they have for doing it that way. Then you can pick apart what will probably be pretty lame reasons. If that fails you can always contact the ADA for additional back-up. There really is no good rationale for not testing in the classroom. It is safer, easier, and much less disruptive. Good luck.
     
  4. selketine

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    One of the links on the ADA page isn't working but I think this is it: http://www.diabetes.org/assets/pdfs/schools/arizona-child-care-diabetes-guidelines.pdf

    First, I would ask in writing for the nurse to provide you a copy of the district policy in writing. This way you have a record that you requested it and you can say something like "Yesterday I was informed by Nurse ____ that the the district policy is that students can only check blood glucose in the health office of the school. I ask that you provide me a copy of this policy ...."

    The purpose of this letter is only to discover whether or not the district actually has a policy and, if so, what exactly does it say. I have been told in the past by school nursing administration staff that there is a policy that XYZ - and when I asked for it in writing - I literally had the woman tell me after a few days that there wasn't a policy. She just "thought" it was a policy cause that is "what they do" - if you can imagine that.:rolleyes:

    If they do have a written policy that says no child may test anywhere but a health room - this is likely something you can challenge. See this: http://www.diabetesinmichigan.org/EdHandout/PDF/JDRF Legal Rights of Student Sect 8.pdf - especially section 8.4 but worth reading through the rest too. The issue there is "blanket policy."

    My guess is that if they do have a policy it doesn't say that kids can only test in the health room. If you ask for the policy in writing they will realize it isn't what they think it is. At least you MUST rule this out before going forward as it won't do you any good to challenge a policy they are just making up.
     
  5. 5kids4me

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    I would fight this tooth and nail..not only for your child but others that will come up against this "policy".

    Eta, If it is a concern with sharps, get a multiclix lancet..
     
  6. TheTestingMom

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    I wouldn't let this rest either. DS uses the MultiClix and he just stuffs the used test strips back in his Spi-Belt, most of the time with them still sticking out of the meter! LOL!


    My DS had a 27 once in the classroom. Can you imagine what could have happened if he wasn't allowed to test in the room, if he would have had to walk to the opposite end of the building to the health room and test :eek:
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2011
  7. Christopher

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    If it is a concern with sharps, ask them what their "policy" is on scissors, staples, paperclips, thumb tacks, protractors, etc.
     
  8. Mymommymommy

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    I wouldn't let this go, I find it VERY hard to believe, I think the law is different in each state I would look up for yourself what the law says. In califorina it states that people with diabetes can check their blood sugar any where on campus including the classroom. (it isn't worded that way but in general.. that 's that it says) If they are self managing. which is where im' going to have a bit of a hurdle i think. Presley is only 5 and can't manage her Diabetes on her own. BUT i still don't think it's fair to ask her to go to the office if she isn't feeling well, or if she wants to check her BG. It makes no sence to me what so ever. I would fight this tooth and nail. Good luck!!!
     
  9. 5kids4me

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    Lol! Very good point! I will remember that one for the future.
     
  10. chbarnes

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    There is often an irrational fear of blood born pathogens. Most people bleed a little from somewhere everyday.
     
  11. jules12

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    There are also some older policies around. My son can test in his classroom now and doses for lunch in the cafeteria but when he goes to middle school in a year, the nurse there told me he wouldn't be allowed to do this. I am not going to worry about that yet....but I will fight her on it. There is no reason to have to go to the nurses office all the time if you child is comfortable testing in the classroom.

    My son didn't want any part of testing in front of his class until really this past year. I leave that kind of thing up to him.
     
  12. hawkeyegirl

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    The first thing I would do is request this accommodation BEFORE you actually want it. If you actually have to get the U.S. Department of Education involved, it isn't exactly a super-speedy process, and you want to give yourself plenty of time. (A year should be sufficient. Our complaint was resolved in about 5 months time.)

    Here is what you should do:

    1. Get a 504 plan.
    2. Request IN WRITING that your daughter be able to test whenever, wherever as part of your 504 plan. (It may help if you have a lawyer do this. It didn't help me (I'm a lawyer, and I put my request on firm letterhead), but odds are decent that a letter from a lawyer may prompt them to treat you more seriously.
    3. When they deny it, ask that they put the denial in writing.
    4. File a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education.

    You'll get your accommodation. It's just a matter of how far they actually push you on this.
     
  13. KylesMom

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    I'm a para in a Kindergatprten room and I can't count the # of scratched open scabs and mosquito bites we have some days, so how about their policy on fingernails in the classroom??:D

    My son tested in the nurses office the first 1/2 of last year...he was newly diagnosed and I didn't fight it. After a while I was tired of him having to leave the room and I let the nurse know I wanted him to test in the classroom from now on. There was no issue of a policy against it but she really drug her feet saying she didn't know how she could easily get his #'s (in other words it was easier for HER for Kyle to come to her). I finally went to the principal with it and it was taken care of Right away with an easy discreet way to relay his BG readings to the nurse. I would not let it go. Things got so much better for Kyle once he tested in class.
     
  14. Beach bum

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    We found this out about our MS too. My daughter who has been testing in the class since 2nd grade (nurse came to her, then in 4th she called on the phone), and to quote her "I have come this far, I am not about to go backwards!"

    We told the MS nurse in no uncertain terms was Abby going to report every time to the office for a check. We have it written in the 504 she can test wherever/whenever on campus. Of course, if there is a problem, yes, she can go to the nurse, but an adult will need to escort her. Our big concern is lost class time and being singled out. She can be tested in about 30 seconds. She cleans up after herself, we use a multiclix.

    To the PP, don't let this rest. Challenge it, call the ADA.
     
  15. deafmack

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    Well first of all a school policy does not circumvent the law. And yes, you can have a 504 plan in place and yes, you can state that your daughter will be able to test in the classroom. The District Head Nurse is just plain wrong on this matter. Just my 2 cents worth, but if my child was low I definitely wouldn't want my child walking anywhere to be treated for a low. I would want them to be tested and treated in the classroom. A school district cannot override Federal Law.
     
  16. akgiauque

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    Communication

    Sounds like a communication problem to me. Either the CNA via nurse or Nurse to CNA to you. Most school nurses let alone district wide nurses understand a 504 and deal with them on a regular basis.
    I would try to visit with the district nurse to clarify the reason for this policy. It may be a concern over a test being invalidated if a child leave during the test, unless accomidations are made. Make your case in person and I would think they will accomidate you.
    It is also good to look up the policy as written by the school board. Most of the time a procedure is stated as policy by principals, teacehrs and nurses, if it is not in the school board policy hand book it is then a procedure and can be changed.
     
  17. dqmomof3

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    I have already fought and won this battle with the high school where I work and Jayden will go, and she's only in the eighth grade. It is a battle worth fighting, every step of the way. If the kids WANT to test in the nurse's office, then they should absolutely be able to do that. If they don't want to, though, there is no way they should be forced to do so. Our school nurse said, "ALL diabetic students must come test in my office at lunchtime and write down the number in a log. Then I'll call the parents if I need to call them." I told her that is not the way my daughter would be doing it. She actually seemed surprised I wouldn't want her to do that...I told her Jayden and I have a system of doing things that works for us. It was one of those "agree to disagree" things, I think!
     
  18. AlisonKS

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    Trust me, call the ADA. We are dealing with a "district policy" and it's interesting what the ADA has dug up for me ;)
     
  19. MTMomma

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    Sending some cyber hugs and encouragement to F I G H T !!!!!
     
  20. CAGrandma

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    It may seem logical for a school district to be concerned about things like the disposal of sharps, or having blood all over the place (really?) but a) it isn't logical at all (change lancets at home, have a sharps container in the classroom, use a multiclix, dispose of bloody (?) strips in a designated spot, etc.) and b) even if there are real problems it doesn't negate the responsibility of the school to follow the law!
    The law is clear - a child with diabetes needs to be safe at school. That means BG tests, with a knowledgeable adult present to help if necessary, where it is needed. Figure out what your child needs and assume that the school will provide that. Let them figure out how to make it happen, but don't think you have to justify what she needs, compromise, or make suggestions.
     

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