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Teenagers..............

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by earruda, Apr 28, 2008.

  1. earruda

    earruda Approved members

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    OK. Who can help me not kill my 15 year old who all of a sudden can't seem to remember to consistently bolus for meals?? I hate to punish for diabetes issues but this just can't continue. We have set her pump to alarm for boluses. I get on her back almost daily. Tonight I took away her computer time. HELP!!

    Elizabeth A.
    Rockland, ME
     
  2. Heather(CA)

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    I was going to say to set an alarm when she starts eating to bolus afterwards, but ti looks like oyu already thought of that:confused: Would two alarms help? One being on a watch?:confused:
     
  3. KeltonsMom

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    When my son Kelton was 13 and still on the pump, he did the same thing your daughter is doing..I tried taking away things like television time, computer time to no avail..Finally the Endo told me to take over all his D care and if he continued his behavior then to take him off of the pump and go back to shots.

    I had to do this for a week and he got the message loud and clear, and he sure hated it when I would give him his shots..
     
  4. MReinhardt

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    My daughter is 18, she does not take total care of her diabetes needs.
    As far as diabetes, she will count carbs, I do all pump functions. She watches but thats about it. I think sometimes our teens get burn out on diabetes, its natural. Parents taking control will help.

    You also might want to ask her Endo, onwhat can help the both of you. They have gone this route many times, I am sure you are not the only parent that they have whos teen does not want to take care of them selves.

    Hang in there! We are all here to help chat if needed.
     
  5. Hollyb

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    I remember when Aaron was getting his pump, a 19-year-old we know who has been diabetic since she was 13 emailed him some advice -- and the biggest thing she said was "don't forget to bolus! You'd be surprised how easy it is!"

    And at the time, when it was so new and all we could think about, we both thought, How could you possibly forget?!? Ha.

    This girl is the most responsible kid I ever met, so if it's easy for her to forget, it's easy for anybody. Aaron doesn't forget often, but it definitely happens. I know if it were me, I would forget too. I forgot EVERYTHING when I was that age!

    I don't have a solution -- just maybe the suggestion that it probably is genuinely hard to remember once it becomes more routine, especially at this scatterbrained age. I think we need to try helping before punishing.

    One thought -- can you be the reminder for breakfast and dinner? And... is there some reward she could work towards for remembering lunch on a consistent basis?
     
    Heather(CA) likes this.
  6. lil'Man'sMom

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    "Raising teenagers is like trying to nail jello to a tree"


    much less sugar-free :D.......
     
  7. Heather(CA)

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    I think this is great advise, myayb you could be the reminder at home...And, if she's forgetting at school at school...Have her go to the nurse after lunch to bolus untli she remembers:cwds:
     
  8. Mom2rh

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    That's what I would suggest. If she doesn't show that she can be responsible then take over for her. Hopefully she'll hate it enough to step up.
     
  9. ianmom

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    Same thing with my 12, soon to be 13 year old son. I remind him to bolus and he will say ok, then he will forget anyway:mad: He has even said yes he has bolused and later we find he didn't. Now I'm like you cannot leave the room until I see you bolusing. Punch it in RIGHT NOW! Our endo says that forgetting to bolus is a very common problem for teens. I've read all the comments on helping teens with d and I do want to take some pressure off him, BUT... I wonder, do you think reminding them constantly actually ends up making it harder for them to remember on their own?
     

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