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Teacher says no to going to the restroom

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Brandi's mom, Sep 7, 2010.

  1. Brandi's mom

    Brandi's mom Approved members

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    Friday Brandi had an issue with one of her teachers not allowing her to go to the restroom. The school has a standing rule called 10/10. They don't let kids go anywhere during the first 10 or last 10 minutes of class. So Brandi waited for the 10 minutes to be up then the teacher refused.

    I told her she should have just either said you can't refuse to let me go and play the D card so to speak, or just WALK OUT and deal with it later.

    We haven't had our 504 meeting so she doesnt have that assurance yet.


    What would you tell your child do to if in this situation? Would you contact the teacher and pitch a fit?
     
  2. Beach bum

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    Contact the nurse and 504 coordinator and tell them the meeting needs to get done. Speak to the nurse about this because not only is having to use the bathroom a result of d and high bg's, holding it is not healthy for her urinary tract.
     
  3. TerpSteph

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    Do you have a written diabetes management plan with doctor's orders on file? My son was required to have one before he would be admitted to school. In addition to information on insulin needs and glucagon usage, the plan spelled out treatment for low bg and unlimited access to water and the bathroom. If you have such a plan in place, I would ask the nurse to remind her teachers of the plan's requirements.
     
  4. danismom79

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    I would contact the teacher, without the fit. I do tell my daughter that if she encounters a problem, to just do what she needs to do and we'll deal with it later. But in your case, it seems the teacher doesn't even know Brandi needs full access to the bathroom.
     
  5. joan

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    Since it is the beginning of school and the teacher may not know what your daughters needs are, I would not make it a big deal. I would have the nurse speak with the teacher today so she is more informed. My son would wait it out not to be disrespectful to the teacher but if he could not wait he would probably just say I have diabetes and need to go. He has had diabetes his whole life so most kids in the class are aware so he is not doesn't care about privacy. If your daughter is not that open with D it makes it tough but if she has to go she should go and deal with it later.
     
  6. sam1nat2

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    I would be upset, I see that Brandi is 16, so its not like a bunch of little kids who always want to use the restroom.

    I would have HER talk to the teacher first, if that doesn't work then step in for her.

    Poor thing, nothings worse than having to go and to be told you can't!!
     
  7. Lisa P.

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    Has the teacher been informed that she should be able to go on request, whether she's had a formal meeting about the 504 or not?

    Does your daughter think that her need to go to the restroom on that particular occasion was diabetes related? Are you concerned about kidney health?

    The whole restroom thing in the classroom is an unholy mess. The classes I've been in, no one is ever denied access to the restroom, the most restriction is that there can't be more than 2 kids gone at a time, so there tends to be a perpetual stream of kids in and out of the class. It's disruptive in a way that folks who haven't tried to teach really would have a hard time imagining. You basically have to entirely alter the way you instruct to fit the fact that a rotating two children are missing instruction all the time.

    Most of the time it has nothing to do, of course, with actually having to use the restroom (some kids are bored, some are dodging class, some are socializing, and some simply don't have the time in those short breaks between classes or are embarrassed to use crowded public toilets), so this creates frustrations for teachers.

    I also think (and this has nothing to do with your daughter) that a lot of teachers get fed up with the idea that a 16 year old can't plan/frankly hold it for half an hour. The high school classes I've been in the kids bring their Big Gulps half the time and never use their breaks to use the bathroom because they know they can just pop out of class any time they want. As a teacher, of course, I have to actually hold it for the whole class time, and maybe for several classes in a row!

    I say this not as an excuse, but just so you can understand this is a hard situation for the teacher and you might want to cut her a little slack (which it sounds like you are already doing).

    Now, once she has been informed if she continues that behavior I'd come down like a load of bricks. :eek:
     
  8. Becky Stevens mom

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    I think that any child being forced to hold urine in is a good way of getting urinary tract infections:( But for our d kids, when they have to go, they have to go! If their bgs are high they get alot of urine in their bladders and Im sure it fills pretty quickly at that point. I would make sure that each teacher or staff member knows about Brandi's diabetes and that she can go to the restroom when she needs to per doctors orders. Get a note from the endo until you get the 504 done
     
  9. denise3099

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    Sometimes you just have to go!! Sure you can plan when you have to use the bathroom but really, what if you're sick, or get diarhea, or feel nauseous, or suddenly get your period. My dh is a high school teacher and he never denies bathroom use to anyone. Your bowels are none of my business. How can anyone tell someone they can't use the bathroom. it's absurd.

    Yes, tell the teacher nicely that your daughter has D and needs unrestricted acces to the bathroom as well as food and water.

    I tell my 8 yr old to just say, "it's ok I'm allowed" and just leave. Then we can deal with it later.
     
  10. valerie k

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    our first meeting with matts teacher it was STRESSED that he got water at the desk and that he has unlimited bathroom breaks and can go to the nurse no matter what. the teacher agree'd and the nurse of cource concurs. Its written in matts 504 as well as his Dr orders.


    I will step out on a limb... when matts 16.. I will tell him, you walk out if your in disagreement with any adult other then your parents (dr...) on a diabestes related issue, do what you have to do and We will deal with the issue together after the fact.

    When matt hits middle/high school... we will meet with each teacher during open house and leave a packet with them on the requirements of matts care. For now, elementary is a breeze and everybody is on board and wants the D kids to succeed. (Im sure the other schools will be that was as well.)
     
  11. Flutterby

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    I would contact the teacher and explain the situation.. Without a 504 yet, she may not even know about the diabetes. I'd also call the school and tell them the 504 meeting needs to be done asap so this doesn't happen again.
     
  12. Mom2rh

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    I emailed all of Ryan's teachers before school started.

    It's hard for kids to advocate for themselves...but sounds like in addition to calls, emails, etc, she needs to be confident enough to stand up for herself.
     
  13. hawkeyegirl

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    No, I would not "pitch a fit."

    Did you contact her teachers at the beginning of the year and explain that Brandi has D, and therefore would need X, Y, and Z accommodations? I would never rely on the nurse to do this for me (if that's what you did). I like the teachers to see my smiling face and hear the words from my mouth. Second best would be an e-mail from me to the teachers.
     
  14. G' S MOM

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    If she had a 504 last year, it should be in effect until a new one is established. At least that is the way it is at our school. We must help our kids stand up for themselves and support them. I agree if they are denied, go and deal with it later. A lot of time commom sense is lacking. I had to add on top of the free and unrestricted use, that my son's bathroom uses does not count the allotted number established by the teacher. He knows that now. (8th grade 13yo)
    Good luck!
    R
     
  15. Christopher

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    Maybe I am dense (and I am definitely sleep deprived) but I am trying to understand what going to the bathroom has to do with diabetes? Why would a CWD need unlimited access to the bathroom? Unlimited access to the nurse, absolutely. Unlimited ability to test and treat, of course. But the bathroom? I guess if that is where they go to test and treat, then I would understand that. But I hope there is a better place to go to do that then the bathroom.
     
  16. mmgirls

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    Most people with D, make more frequent bathroom trips since most will go over their renal thresshold and the kidneys will produce more urine than a non D.

    I am lucky that even when running on the high side of things that my dd can hold it forever. Allot can not, and it is generally accepted that they need should be given access to the bathroom without fault.
     
  17. liasmommy2000

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    Yes, when high you need to drink more water and use the restroom more frequently.

    I also have a child who can hold it a long time. That combined with in class restrooms throughout her elementary school means it really hasn't been an issue. I'm sure it could be though as she gets older. I know one child a few years older than her in our district had an accident a year or so ago when she was running high due to pump issue/changing back to shots. I don't know if she was scared to ask (middle school) or what but she didn't quite make it. I can only imagine how mortifying that was for her. According to her mom she managed to make it to the office without any kids seeing her, but wow.
     
  18. Christopher

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    That makes sense, thanks for clarifying. I guess I never thought about it because I don't see that with her.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2010
  19. hawkeyegirl

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    We've never seen it either. I think Jack could hold it for weeks. :rolleyes:
     
  20. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    I would calmly get a note from her physician and have it express orders that your daughter must be permitted to use the bathroom whenever she feels a need. I would then ask the principal to write her a permanent pass for the duration of the school year to keep with her in school to show any teacher and substitute whenever there's an objection to her needing to use the bathroom.
     

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