- advertisement -

target range

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Lynnieg123, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. Lynnieg123

    Lynnieg123 Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2011
    Messages:
    114
    I'm sure this has been asked but I can't seem to make my search work to find it. How often would you say you child's BG is within target? Do you often have days in a row when they stay in target all day? Our daughter was diagnosed in February last year and I still feel like we're struggling to get her BGs stable. Does this actually happen? I understand she may still be making her own insulin which can make things harder to control, but I can't think of the last time we had a 24 hour period when she was in target all day. Guess I just feel like were failing at taking care of her diabetes.:(
     
  2. danielsmom

    danielsmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2011
    Messages:
    798
    I was wondering the same thing? Am I expecting too much in wanting to be in target for days at a time?..I can shoot for one low or less a week, which we manage to do now....but my son can be in range for a day and out the next and then semi range/and not....What is realistic?
     
  3. minniem

    minniem Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2011
    Messages:
    286
    We very rarely have a day where he is in range all day. We just hope the majority of checks are in range and if they are not then we try to figure out why. But a lot of times, it's just the nature of the beast.
     
  4. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,560
    After over 14 years of this, being in range 60% of the time is good.
     
  5. JaxDad

    JaxDad Approved members

    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Messages:
    280
    Yeah, our endo said if you hit 50/50 you're doing great.

    Some days it's much better and we might hit 80/20, and some days much worse where we might have gotten 20/80. I seriously doubt we ever had a single day where EVERY check was within range.
     
  6. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,747
    I think it depends how you define "In range" as well. If you do post-prandial checks rather than only before meals, it gets much harder to have all tests in range. And with a CGM, every reading counts. We were told at diagnosis to strive for 75% in range. Right now we're at 63% for the last two weeks according to CareLink, but that's everything, not just before meals.
     
  7. mysweetwill

    mysweetwill Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2011
    Messages:
    249
    So discouraging :(
    So the honeymoon phase is just a way to ease into the whole thing, and then real craziness begins?
     
  8. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    In my opinion, people with diabetes will never have "stable" bg's. It is a great goal to strive for, and it is great to also try and reduce the time they are out of range, but to expect them to be in range all day, every day is not realistic.

    I have found there are some days where she is in range for a lot of the tests, but who knows what is happening between the tests? (unless you have a CGM).

    Try not to think that you are failing because she is not in range all the time. You are setting yourself (and eventually her) up for a life of disappointment. Instead, do your best to understand her body, how insulin/carbs/activity work for her, and take a holistic approach, making sure that diabetes is only one of the many things that you deal with her about.
     
  9. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    You are in the very early days and it is normal to feel discouraged. I still feel that way 5 years into this. And I am sure I will have days like that 10 years into it. But try and focus on the positives, all the other great things that your child is and does. There is no reason they can't live a full, exciting, healthy life. And so much of it depends on how you model your behavior about the illness. They will take their cues from you.
     
  10. caspi

    caspi Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Messages:
    5,134
    Well said, Christopher. Perhaps it's just me, but I seem to be seeing a trend here on CWD lately with so much emphasis being put on BG #'s and A1C's. Of course they are important tools in the management of D, but it is VERY important not to get too wrapped up in specific #'s. :cwds:
     
  11. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    8,719
    Nope, you are not failing anything ;) This is hard stuff being a sub-pancreas. Steven has had diabetes for 7 1/2 years and I can probably count on both hands the number of days in a year when he is in range all day. During the holidays we had a couple days in a row where his BGs were high and out of range for most of those 2 days:( I usually wait till Im in the car driving somewhere by myself and do alot of cursing on days like those. I mean I use every and any words I can think of to express my displeasure about those suckish days. The first year for me was really the hardest. I found it all so dang confusing alot of the time and became obsessed with getting it right and keeping his diabetes under control. But Ive discovered that the word control is better suited to panty hose then type 1 diabetes:)
     
  12. danielsmom

    danielsmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2011
    Messages:
    798
    I think this is where I'm at right now Becky.....At some point I need to just not let it run my life...I don't want to have it on my mind 24/7...I should focus more on my son's excitement at doing things....going places....having fun and not obsessing about D!
     
  13. pianoplayer4

    pianoplayer4 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,060
    My meter says I'm "in range" (meaning I don't have to correct with my pump (80-100) ) 20% of the time in the last two weeks, I'm high 60% and low 40%. personally I call "in range" 70-150 in that case I've been in range probably 40-50% of the time.

    I honestly don't worry about it to much, you can only do your best.
     
  14. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    Right now? Almost never. My son is very responsible, very smart and intuitive about his diabetes, but quite frankly right now he's also very lazy with it. Not so lazy as to be negligent, just kind of casual about it all. The result is that he's not in range often. He also eats non stop so it's always hard to know if it's truly not treating or digesting food that's at issue.

    Yesterday he was at 115 and I had to go look at his meter to verify, it had been a while since he had a nice normal number like that.

    Does it drive me bonkers? Yes. Yes it does. Wildly so. But it isn't my disease to live with, it's my son and I am educating, advising, supporting to the best of my ability. He's healthy and he's responsible and in a big picture way he's handling it well.

    In another month he will probably work to stay in range more. That's been his pattern, tight control followed by casual control and back again.
     
  15. manda81

    manda81 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Messages:
    670
    Our endo likes to see 50% "in range" (for my son, his dr's idea of range is still 80-180, but we correct anything over a 110), and less than 10% in lows.

    Our first goal is always lows, we want to make sure he's not having many of them, and we usually average about 5%. We make the "range" about 80% of the time, but it's a wide range.

    Today at lunch, he was 340. First day back at school from winter break. *shrug* There is no "control", there's just do the best you can and move on. We check him around 10x a day, so he never stays at a high for very long, and in the long run, I think that's what helps him maintain a steady A1C. Few lows, and short lived highs, those are our real goals.
     
  16. Lynnieg123

    Lynnieg123 Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2011
    Messages:
    114
    Thank you, this makes me feel less like a failure.
     
  17. lgouldin

    lgouldin Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2011
    Messages:
    249
    Instead of looking at it like a pass/fail grade....just treat and move on.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice