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t1d child is afraid of vaccinations

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Debdebdebby13, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. Debdebdebby13

    Debdebdebby13 Approved members

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    My daughter will be 6 at the end of the week and we are about 6 months into our D journey.

    Today at lunch we were talking about her birthday and then I was thinking aloud to myself and I said, "oh, I need to call the pediatrician to schedule your well child appointment."

    Her eyes got big and she said "will I have to get a shot?" We delayed some of her vaccinations so we are still working through them so yes, she will have to have a shot.

    Right there at the table at TGIFridays she starts crying that she is scared to get a shot...all this after having 5+ shots a day for the last 6 months.

    I'm just not sure what I can say to convince her that she'll be fine. She is just sure that the vaccine shots are way, way worse than her insulin shots.

    Anyway, just wondering if anyone else's kids are still afraid to get shots even though they get many shots a day.
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Yes, 14 and she still moans and groans with the best of them.:rolleyes:

    With hindsight I wish I had nipped the "well, she get's shots every day - she shouldn't be bothered" BS. Fact is it's the brightly lit, nasty medically smelling peds office, with the nurse with the tray of syringes, it's not the same thing.

    If I had a do over I'd call the ped and tell them that she's feeling extra anxious about her vaccinations and that I didn't want anyone shaming her.
     
  3. Lisa P.

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    Hate to tell you, but she's very possibly right! :( Someone here will be better at the details, but I've seen that some shots are given at a different layer, some have ingredients that can hurt, there is a larger amount of material in some of them so you're pushing more under the skin, it takes longer, and the syringe is bigger! I wonder how she knew!? :eek:

    I'm sure that was tough, my oldest daughter hates vaccinations and gets very emotional about it, she anticipates and that makes it worse because she's so tense, so the next time she remembers how bad the last time was and tenses even more, etc.!

    I don't know if you've ever pumped but if you have Emla in the house you could ask your ped if you could use it if it would help. Otherwise, I guess she's just like any kid, no kids like shots! Promises of ice cream sometimes help us! Probably good to a degree that she knows ahead of time instead of getting there thinking she's getting the normal OUCH and getting surprised with an OUCH.:eek:
     
  4. Debdebdebby13

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    No pump, so no Emla, but I was actually thinking about how I could get some, because my kiddo goes through enough, she doesn't need anxiety about vaccinations too.

    I know that the needles may be bigger etc, but I didn't want to tell her that, because then she would DEFINITELY be freaking out. I did actually promise to take her to get ice cream afterwards :p
     
  5. LizinTX

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    Lisa is completely right, different ingredients, different needle, different layer of muscle. Your peds office should have some sort of numbing cream, call beforehand and set that up. By the way, my 16 year old boy, who was dx'd when he was five, had to have a tetanus shot, and he still hated it. Ice cream afterwards is always good medicine. :D
     
  6. MomofSweetOne

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    My daughter, depending on her mode, will tell other kids her insulin needles only feel like mosquito bites. Other times, she lets them think they're awful and describes the huge inserter (pump) needle in detail. What surprised me was last week when she had to look away from the blood when I cut myself. I guess there's a difference between her blood that we see all the time and my blood!
     
  7. Charliesmom

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    They are much worse. I got a booster shot last year and it hurt like heck. I was sore for days.
     
  8. caspi

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    I might be in the minority here but I think the numbing cream might make things worse. It has to sit for a few minutes so in that time the child is dwelling on the fact that the shot is coming. Our pedi office has always been great about shots. One nurse stands on one side talking to the child and the other nurse administers the shot. They must be magicians because they keep the needles hidden and then before they know it, it's over with. :) I think if they had to sit there with a numbing cream on, waiting for the inevitable, it would make it worse. But that's JMO....
     
  9. swellman

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    Different kids are different.

    Some kids feel pain differently ... I know I do and I know my son does.

    I can't remember him complaining about any shot but he always complains about the once a year he has a blood draw. He complains all the up to and stops when it goes in - then it's all "that wasn't so bad".

    I never say it isn't going to hurt but I do say that it won't last very long. I haven't found anything that would soothe him for the blood draws. Now we just do it.
     
  10. jilmarie

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    I think it depends on the kid. The numbing creme could make them dwell on the vaccine or it could make them less stressed about it. I think if they have had a good experience with numbing creme for pump sites, it might be worth a try for vaccines.
     
  11. mom2Hanna

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    My 12 yo gets very upset about shots and Emla makes it worse for her because she percieves that numb feeling as pain. So not only does she still anticipate the shot, she was upset for hours over her numb arm, this was back when she was 5 or 6, it wasn't worth it for her. Worked great for Hanna at the same age, prediabetes.
     
  12. Beach bum

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    11 years old and mine still gets anxious. However, this year we have a new doc/nurse and I have to say, this nurse was fantastic. Her style was no nonsense, but still compassionate. She talked to my daughters while she was doing it, told them to hold their breath and when she was ready to inject, she said now blow like you're blowing out a balloon. I have to say, this worked really well, they barely felt anything.

    When my daughter was younger I would bring a syringe where the needle was taken out and while she was getting hers she would give her favorite stuffy one. It worked well, though I have to say the above worked really well.
     
  13. Lisa P.

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    No, I agree, if you've never had the numbing cream it might not be a good idea to start on vaccination day. My middle daughter, we used a generic that I figured out later only had one of the two ingredients, when she had a blood draw. She'd never used it before. Not only did she not like the feeling, it didn't take away the pain of the draw! It was not good.

    You can sometimes time it, though, that you put the Emla on and cover it and it's "ready" when the time comes. You know, rather than sitting there waiting for it to start "working". But this can be a pain, too, because doctors and nurses are on their own schedule so when we've done this sometimes they aren't ready and you can't let it keep sitting there, so we wind up having to start a new patch of emla on the other arm!

    The breath thing works for us, too. We've never used Emla for vaccines, just blood draws, but I thought maybe if the OP had used it before she could consider it.

    When my oldest got her shots at around that age, she simply kicked the nurse. I'm not sure if it helped with the pain, but maybe the OP could recommend her daughter try it? :p
     
  14. Amy C.

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    Vaccines hurt! Insulin shots usually do not hurt. It is quite natural to fear what hurts you.
     
  15. manda81

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    My son did the same, and will not let us give him injections or put his pump on his thighs, even years later.
     
  16. DsMom

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    After my son was dx, he was on MDI, and we had a pedi check up a few months later. I figured the shots would be a breeze, since he too was getting 4 a day. Couldn't have been more wrong. He SCREAMED the building down...much more so than he ever did before dx. I was shocked!

    We did try the numbing cream after he started on the pump, but it didn't help much. He said it still hurt. The numbing cream does seem to work when he gets blood drawn, though.

    Even worse than vaccinations for my kids is the Strep test. Few months back, my nonD son had to have one done. Funniest thing I ever saw (I know, real sympathetic, huh??:rolleyes::eek:). I was sitting on the exam table with him, the nurse came in with the testing supplies....and I have never seen my son move so fast. One minute he was sitting next to me, the next he was trying to squeeze himself under a chair in the corner. All I saw was this blur whizzing past me!!:p Took me and another nurse to hold him down while the other nurse did the test. And this is a big 9 year old! They HATE that test!!
     
  17. hawkeyegirl

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    My son is 8 and hates, hates, hates shots. We use EMLA (we use it for his sisters' vaccinations too) and it works great! :)
     
  18. liasmommy2000

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    LOL. My dd was the same way when she had to get a flu shot/vaccines the first few years after diagnosis. AND well....the vaccine and flu shot needles ARE bigger. And more painful.

    My dd was five and a half at diagnosis. As she got older the vaccines/flu shots got to be no big deal. One thing that helped us was a few years ago when my mom took her to get her flu shot so I didn't have to take more time off of work. My nephew sees the same pediatrician, so my sister also took him at the same time. DD was determined that SHE was not going to cry like her cousin (10 mos younger). After that it's been no big deal as she was not going to be a baby like him lol. Now it's not an issue at all.

    Good luck!
     
  19. StillMamamia

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    Oh, my 8yr old acts like he's being skinned alive when getting a vaccine!

    For blood draws, I do try to use Emla and bribery :eek:, but for vaccines, well, just bribery.
     
  20. Annapolis Mom

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    I've always been fascinated at how much my D daughter hates vaccinations, while my non-D son doesn't care it all.

    My take on it is that she doesn't get to cry at all the shots she gets every day, so she lets it all go during the vaccinations. She's such a trouper otherwise. She also goes overboard when she gets the tiniest cut or bangs her arm or leg on a piece of furniture. She just wants to cry for herself and the idea of crying over her diabetes might be too big and frightening and futile.
     

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