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T1D and breastfeeding?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by kidpsych2be, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. kidpsych2be

    kidpsych2be Approved members

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    Does anyone have any long term observations to share?

    Athena is still nursing and her endocrinologist supports this (thankfully). We're still relatively new to all this (two weeks out from dx) so I honestly couldn't tell you what nursing does to her sugars as they are high 24 hours a day no matter what I do.

    I just wanted to see if there were any other moms still nursing their bubs - especially toddlers since, at 2.5, breast milk isn't exactly considered their sole source of nutrition...?
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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  3. Christopher

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    If your daughter's blood glucose is high all day every day you should be in consultation with her endo to increase her insulin and learning about counting carbs, weighing her portions, etc.

    Good luck.
     
  4. nebby3

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    I had finished nursing before my dd was dx'd though she was only 19 months old. But I did want to say that my dd was also high for quite a while after dx. They were slowly adjusting her insulin doses but they were very cautious, especially with one so young, and it took a while. I thought I was to blame because they had made it sound so easy "do this and this and her bgs should be this" and it just wasn't working out. But give it time and you will get there. I suspect that you just cannot bolus the humalog accurately for breastmilk so that it will basically be covered by her long-acting insulin.
    Good luck
     
  5. Anyelday

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    Kudos to you for still nursing. My non D son weaned a little after his third birthday. I think it is too soon to tell with the BG levels. My 5 year old daughter was just diagnosed on x-mas eve and her levels are still changing but they did remain high for a week or two after diagnosis. My son nursed more as a toddler than as a newborn so I know counting carbs for nursing sessions in a toddler would be a bit tricky. I checked the LLL site and didn't get anything but I will run it by my LLL group...we have a very active FB group and I am hoping someone there has some good advice for you.

    When my son was two they thought I had Lymes and wanted to me to stop nursing so i could take a strong antibiotic. I told them no...and had further testing done.. and it turns out I had Epstein Barr and CMV which did not require medication. I was told by a lot of people at that time to just stop nursing to make things easier but I am glad I did what was right for us.
     
  6. Meredithsmom

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    Meredith, dx at age 2, ran high for about 6 weeks. They were very cautious about increasing her insulin because she was so young and didn't want to see her crash.

    Can't give advice on the nursing issue as we were done well before dx. But as far as the highs go, give it time. You are VERY new to this. She will come down. Hang in there.:p
     
  7. sarahspins

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    It's probably not having a huge impact on her #'s - as you said it's not her sole source of nutrition, however it's definitely a huge source of comfort so it could actually be helping if it's keeping her less stressed :)

    Until you and your doctor get her insulin doses worked out she will run higher for a little while - in the short term this is absolutely fine and much less dangerous than aggressively bringing her down in range and dealing with a lot of lows.
     
  8. mmgirls

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    The problem is that we have no idea what this new poster means by "high". I beleive that many endo's are careful with lowering BG quickly, it has only been two weeks, be gentle and kind.

    It would be better to ask the OP what she means by high, above 150?, above 250?, mostly in the 300s. Then ask if she feels like she is getting what she needs from her healthcare team, help her by communicating knowledge not just saying that it is not OK to be high all the time.
     
  9. mmgirls

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    Chris,
    Using language like "should be", "just letting her", or "to think it was ok", is not very kind or gentle in my mind.

    This type of language makes me feel like you do not beleive that the OP is trying her best! her damndest to help her very younge child be healthy and happy.

    OP,
    I wish i have advise for you re: breastfeeding but i was asked to ween at her DX at 13months and it was horrible for all involved. Mostly because i was unable to express milk for her to try a bottle since for her it was her milk source. the weening only lasted the 2 months that I was staying with my inlaws after her DX. Once I was home in my house alone with her I could not be distracted from her crying at naptime that i put her back to the breast. It had been two months and I did not have a milk supply anymore. She just needed "boobie time", to be on my lap, skin to skin and fall asleep in my arms. I continued to have afternoon boobie with her until she was nearly 3. then we were talking about having a sister and boobies should be for the baby.

    You will have to experiment, if you have a a schedual for 'boobie time" becuase at this point it is more of a bonding thing rather than her sole milk source. that will make it easier. If you think you can make an educated guess for the amount of milk she is taking in then you can try to count and cover it with insulin breastmilk carbs

    Or you can note the duration and if it was both breasts and dose based on that. Human milk is digested pretty fast compaired to cows milk so just keep that in mind. The important thing is if this is something you want to continue then continue to work at it to find the right thing for your family.
     
  10. hawkeyegirl

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    There was nothing wrong with Chris' original post.

    To the OP, I agree that the breastmilk is probably not having a huge effect on your daughter's numbers. I also agree that during these early days, it is common to have daily contact with your endo's office, as they help you adjust your daughter's insulin needs. I'm very sorry you had to join us, but glad you found us. :)
     
  11. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Good luck finding a more knowledgable bunch of Type 1 parents. If a minor squabble makes it impossible for you to see the informed/supportive comments, to appreciate what you did in fact get on this very narrowly focused and specific post then I doubt you will find "the right place" anywhere on the internet.

    My advice? Suck it up and listen to the comments that were on point and disregard the rest. There is no better place to hear from parents who have been there, done that.
     
  12. Katie'sMom

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    My daughter was diagnosed when she was 2.5 and still nursing. I was also a new LLL Leader and had a hard time finding information...however, after researching the carb content and knowing that a baby takes 2-4 oz of BM in a nursing session, BM has around 2g carb per ounce, so a nursing session was about 4-8 g carb. At the beginning, once we entered the honeymoon, that number of carbs did not impact my daughter's BG levels. The benefits of immune protection far outweigh any slight adjustments in insulin. And also, I am convinced that nursing at night was at times just enough to keep her from a hypo.

    While we were in the hospital, the CDE did measure BG before and 30 minutes after nursing and she did not spike...antecdotal, but she was encouraging about continuing to BF.

    My daughter continued to nurse and we had no serious illness until after she weaned....about 2 months after she weaned, she got a serious tummy bug and ended up in the hospital. So I would continue as long as you are able/comfortable with nursing.
     
  13. kidpsych2be

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    No, a minor squabble does not make anything impossible for me. I've seen the positive comments and am digesting all sorts of new information as fast as I can.

    You've got 11 years on me with this (from a quick glance at your siggy)....might I ask you to go back to that time when your child was newly diagnosed and remember that fear of the unknown and let me have just a modicum of time to flounder a bit? Just a tiny bit. I'm still mourning the loss of that 'perfectly healthy child' that was born not quite 3 years ago. While you may have a handle on this as your new normal, I do not. Far from it. There is nothing that is making holding down my screaming child, my baby, okay for me right now. I'm still waking for glucose tests in the middle of the night and not able to go back to sleep. Surviving on coffee, adrenaline, worry and about 3 hours of patchy sleep a night. I have a million questions and about double as many concerns. So maybe you should be the one sucking it up and give those of us who are brand new to all of this a little bit of a chance to wade through these murky waters and feel our way into our new normal?
     
  14. kidpsych2be

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    I was pretty energized when my Endo said he was pro-nursing and that we'd deal with whatever comes our way in regards to it. I was nursing her while she was coming out of DKA and that was amazing for me. And, obviously, for her. If Athena has her way, she'll be nursing through college, I'm sure of it! :rolleyes:

    Honestly it's bringing ME comfort as well. And oftentimes I can bribe her to try and stay calm during injections. When she loses her cool, it's really hard not to hurt her when the needle slips. :(
     
  15. Mish

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    I think the suck it up comment is in relation to the silly spat that's happening and hijacking your thread. :cwds: Ignore that stuff, find your way to the good advice. Don't let that garbage derail your need to learn. We've all been there. We are not without compassion. We're all sitting here this morning with varying degrees of sleep last night, most of us very little. This is our collective normal. It's yours now too, like it or not. Which is why when garbage like this happens in a thread it's the time to put on your troll suit and wade through the garbage from those who only want to cause drama. SarahMaddie'sMom was just helping you find your own personal suit of armor so that you can protect yourself when you need the info most. :cwds:
     
  16. hawkeyegirl

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    I think that would be a great idea. I hope the OP can go back and look at the thread and realize that none of the squabbling was directed at her, so I hope she can move forward without taking it personally. This is absolutely, BAR NONE, the best online resource for parents of children with diabetes. I can assure the OP that no matter how far any of us is out from diagnosis, none of us has forgotten what those early days felt like. My family is over 5 years out from diagnosis, and believe me, I can remember those early weeks and months like they were yesterday. We all have been exactly where you are now, and although we all may have different styles of communication, everyone here wants to help you through this tough time in the best way that we know how. Even our little spats and arguments are generally rooted in good intentions, and it may help to keep that in mind going forward. :eek:
     
  17. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

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    I've hidden some of the squabbling, hoping to leave the important parts of this discussion.
     
  18. kidpsych2be

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    Thank you. I do appreciate the perspective. It's difficult to see the bigger picture sometimes. Knowing it will become less stressful in time is reassuring. Asking questions and getting varied perspective is helpful.

    I'm not normally a defensive person but the diagnosis blindsided me so I'm still kind of reeling from that.
     
  19. Christopher

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    That is a completely normal reaction to something as life changing as this. Just know that over time you will adjust to it and things will not feel so shocking. There will be peaks and valleys, and as someone here said, it is a marathon not a sprint. Pace yourself and take it one meal, one bg, one day at a time.

    Good luck
     
  20. kirsteng

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    I'm so glad that your endo is pro-nursing. Athena NEEDS her mama and her comfort during this tough transition, and I agree with you, you need to keep that bonding and normalcy for you as well. It's amazing how much they can put up with when they have their boobie nearby! ;)

    Grady (born May 09) nursed until July of last year (about 3 and 3 months). I also thought he'd never give it up, and likely he'd have gone even longer had we not moved and changed his routine around bedtime/nursing. But at the end it was his choice to stop, it was gentle... no drama for either of us. The way it was supposed to be. I'm glad Athena still has nursing in her life with all she's going through - it can do nothing but help her.

    I'm sure it can't be that hard for the endo to help you estimate/account for how much she's getting.

    Good luck!
     

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