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Sure signs I'm a newbie...

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Debdebdebby13, Dec 28, 2011.

  1. nanhsot

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    Yes, this. I like reading about the journey that got us all here, those with dramatic stories and those with mundane are equally educational to me and equally interesting on a social level. It is my belief that we all can learn from one another and I absolutely did not read the original question in any negative way.

    I would consider myself lucky if I had caught it earlier. I do not consider myself inferior because I did not. It is what it is, and how others got here does not define my family. Knowing myself and my belief in alternative healing, I believe that being hospitalized and in ICU forced me to react, a softer diagnosis would have led me to some denial, I believe.

    As a newly diagnosed parent, I read that the OP was curious about the journey of others. It does seem that sometimes others look for the judgment in others. That seems rather pointless and sad to me. If a post offends you, just move on, don't reply. It is clear that it did not offend anyone else, given the number of people who willingly and openly replied.

    I will truly never understand the point of allowing an internet thread to bother you in this way.
     
  2. Style mom

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    This is an emotionally charged topic, and I can completely understand why some are sensitive about it. Many of us feel tremendous guilt about not seeing the signs earlier and realizing how close our kids were to dying. It's not the thread "bothering" us, but the feelings that threads like these dredge up. I don't know about you, but I don't "allow" threads to bother me. They do or they don't, but I don't have much control over those posts that cut me to the quick. I didn't get the same feeling that caspi did about the OP, but I understand why she read it the way that she did, and I don't think her feelings are any less valid than yours or mine. And I don't think that she should have to refrain from posting her feelings in a respectful way, which I think that she did.

    For me, I do not have a clue what my son's A1c or BG was at diagnosis. Those numbers meant nothing to me at that point, and so even if I was told, I certainly don't remember. He was in the hospital for three days and two nights.

    So, to the OP, yes. You were lucky. You were lucky that your child was not life-flighted somewhere. You were lucky that you were never told that your child might not make it. You were lucky that you didn't have to help pin your child down while he screamed as the nurse searched for a vein in his dehydrated little body. You were lucky that your child was never unconscious. You were lucky that your child didn't die. Some do. In that respect, everyone who has posted on this thread was lucky.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2011
  3. manda81

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    Caspi, I just want to give you a (((hug))) ... I hope you aren't blaming yourself for not knowing your child had t1 early.

    We didn't know either. My son was never sick, until the day we went to the ER. It was the weirdest thing. He was totally fine, normal 2 year old. Maybe twice he'd had diapers leak at night, but he was always 90th percentile (he was 9lbs when he was born), and so him being too big for diapers was more of the issue we were concerned with, than the fact that he would sometimes pee through them. We didn't take notice to the sippy cup always needing to be full. He didn't make an issue about it, he'd just ask for more. We have no family history and did not know.

    I thought he had the flu. And got dehydrated really quickly, and within 8 hours of his first vomiting episode, we were in the ER, waiting on lifeflight, but then there was a hailstorm, so they had to ground ambulance him.

    The ambulance driver ran into my husband at his work one day, and recognized him, and had to ask if my son lived. He was sure he wasn't going to, and talked to my husband for a while. He had a son the same age, and took off the rest of the evening after delivering my son to the children's hospital.

    I'm not kidding when I say it was the most horrifying experience ever. I watched my son literally dying for 8 hours, and then unconscious for 3 days. He went from totally fine, to everything horribly wrong that fast.

    Yes, with an A1C that high, he had been "sick" for a while, but he was such an easy kiddo, and so laid back (still is!) that I think it just affected him differently? IDK

    But what I do know, is you can't blame yourself. When it came time to do the right thing, we all did. We got them to the dr, or the nurse, or checked the bg or ketones at home if we had the knowledge. And now we're here, trying our best to stay on top of the game. There's nothing to blame yourself for.
     
  4. MomofSweetOne

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    This is definitely an emotional issue for us all. I posted that the hospital told us she was the healthiest new diagnosis they'd seen - and we'd already known for 3 weeks and had difficulty getting an appointment. But for me, the months of her being sick all the time and waiting for the D-shoe to fall were awful. She'd been diagnosed with Hashimoto's the year before, and I knew with that diagnosis, her odds of diabetes went up. I knew the symptoms of diabetes because of having a sibling with D. We rarely had juice in our home because I knew it was concentrated sugar, but I had bought it while company was with us. My daughter was then up four times in the night that week, so I asked our dr. to test her. She initially refused, as my daughter had run hypoglycemic for the three years previous. By the time we got the lab results, her symptoms of thirst and being in the bathroom every few minutes had disappeared. I wouldn't have suspected diabetes by that point. It was very frightening to know her BGs were high but not to be able to get her into the pediatric endo. I am thankful that she was never in DKA; I hope she never has to feel what DKA would feel like. The emotions, the fear, I wouldn't want to live through that again.
     
  5. nanhsot

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    Oh, I totally get that this is an emotional topic that can dredge up feelings of guilt. What I meant by my statement is that I've been around the block once or twice and I no longer let internet posts rule my life. If something offends, bothers, or insults me, I just move on.

    Today my daily devotional was about how disconnected we are from people in our world, and how harmful that can be. I guess my current frame of mind is that I do not want internet threads to ruin my day or otherwise rule my emotions. That's all I meant by what I wrote.

    The emotions are valid and I understand them. I just personally no longer let words on a screen affect me at a deeply emotional level. I realize that it's not about me and therefore I can in some ways choose (or not) my reaction to words. Close the page. Walk away. Hug your kids. Be with people who love and know you. Yes, I do feel that can control what we "allow" to affect us by surrounding ourselves with reality.

    I can come to this and other forums for support and education and even friendship. But I personally have found a way to disconnect a bit and not read into the words of others things that hurt me.
     
  6. pianoplayer4

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    My A1C was 14.5 at dx, I was 600+. they had me in the ER for about 8hrs then I was admitted to the hospital where I stayed for four days. While there they trained me and my parents, I know my mom felt guilty for a long time (probably still does a bit) that's just something people have to deal with, its part of grieving. I know I felt guilty at making everyone around me so stress, costing my parents so much money, and making my sisters feel ignored. I'll always feel that way a bit I guess.

    I haven't read all the posts so I'm not sure what everyone's arguing about but no one wins so just let it go.
     
  7. Charliesmom

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    I like to read about diagnosis stories. It's always interesting how differently the disease effects other people. If I don't care for a discussion I back out of it and look for another topic. It's hard sometimes but I try to respond and treat others like I would in a real conversation.
     
  8. MamaBear

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    Hmmm I think sharing in some ways is helpful and interesting, but with these sort of posts I find myself interested in the beginning, and then sad halfway through. Sometime reading some posts makes me a little envious of those who didn't see their child dying before their eyes, sorry but even if the end result brings us all to the same place, I do think the different "boats" we arrived in do in fact effect out day to day feelings and management. And sometimes reading posts of those whose children were in as serious a condition as my son was, it makes me cry, because it makes me remember images I wish I could forget. It also makes me so sad that any child has to go through this. :(

    But however we got here, we do need to try and get along. Let's face it we need one another.
     
  9. JaxDad

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    Jack was diagnosed during a routine "well baby" visit. Our pediatrician does urine checks as a routine and he had spilled sugars. I don't remember what his A1c was, I do remember that his BG was somewhere in the 300s and he had no ketones present.

    I've also not read all the back posts, but will say that only the good feel guilt. So if you're feeling guilty, take pride that the feeling is there because your a caring, good parent, and forgive yourself for not knowing what you didn't know.
     
  10. Mommy For Life

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    AMEN! :cwds:
     
  11. MamaBear

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    I hope that we are all able to do that someday. :(
     
  12. mommylovestosing

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    **sigh** how true :(
     
  13. Darryl

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    Hi and welcome!

    Ours was 10.4 at diagnosis with BG of 550 and ketones. Obvious symtpoms had been present for about a month at that time, but we didn't know anything about juvenile diabetes and figured the sypmtoms were just something else. We took her to the pediatrician when the symptoms started but diabetes did not occur to him either. My wife figured out what it was during our winter vacation and brought dd back to the pediatrician the day we got back, and the pediatrician did a BG check and it was "HIGH" so he sent us to the hospital.

    I think what you describe is normal. Some kids dx at a higher A1C, and probably siblings of kids with JD whose parents are keenly aware of the possibility get dx'd earlier.
     

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