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strong honeymoon

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Kayla and Ethan's Mom, Feb 10, 2011.

  1. Kayla and Ethan's Mom

    Kayla and Ethan's Mom Approved members

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    Hey! I think I have read the answer to this, somewhere on here, but couldn't find the old thread.

    We have a new student just diagnosed at our school. He is probably in the 3rd or 4th week. He started at 13 units of lantus and is now at 6 and hasn't had any novolog since Friday. He is still having some lows. The parents keep asking if he was misdiagnosed and the drs say he is just strongly honeymooning.

    I was wondering if anyone has had a similar situation and if you would please share it with me, so that I can share it with them. I just don't want them to get their hopes up or this child's hopes up that the whole thing is going to go away. (It would be great if it were true!)

    Thanks for you help!!
     
  2. VinceysMom

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    I met a wonderful family last April, their son, about age 10 at that time, had just been diagnosed T1D. He had been on lantus only for a really long time.

    In my opinion, in this case, it sounds like a very strong honeymoon. I know my son's first A1c before his official diagnosis was 7.4, and glucose tolerance test was 150 at two hours. At that point they labeled it "glucose intolerance". They did not start my son on Lantus right away as they had him wear a CGM for 3 days and based on those readings, Lantus was not the right answer at that time. His official diagnosis came 4 month later. Maybe this family needs to cut back Lantus again. But they probably need to keep a log of numbers and then chat with their Endo.

    Best of luck to them.
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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  4. txmom

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    I have a little experience with this.....

    My son was diagnosed at 15 - in the hospital for 5 days, he was given 23 units of Lantus. When we returned home and he began his regular routine (which included walking 18 holes of golf almost everyday), he was really low all the time. He could barely walk two holes without being in the 60 range. We altered his Lantus (lowered by 2 units at a time) until we found a level that kept him in range. We ended up lowering his Lantus to 9. He was in a strong honeymoon period as well. We have since increased his Lantus to 11 and they believe he is still honeymooning.

    Also, puberty and growth spurts at this age will effect his numbers as well.

    Hope this helps. As much as we hoped he had been mis-diagnosed, I knew in my heart that he had not. Unfortunately managing D is as much an art as a science and you have to keep working to find what works for your child. Good luck to them....
     
  5. taximom

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    Yes, I have 2 friends w/ daughters(12 & 13) that were both dx'd w/in the last year. Both are on only 6U Lantus and only get 0-2U Novolog a day depending on what they are eating. We (my DS) never experienced such honeymoon, if any at all :(.
     
  6. ShelbysMom

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    My DD daughter started on NPH and novolog for meals. I remember her NPH being 4 units at dx and we got down to 1 unit for quite a while. My mother in law was convinced that she was "cured". I told her if she ever told my daughter that we would have some real problems......unfortunately honeymoon will eventually end.
     
  7. Caldercup

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    My son had/has a very strong honeymoon. He never went totally off Novolog like the child you mention, but his ratio was very big (like 1:30) and his Lantus was not that much.

    Now he's on the pump, but (almost 2 1/2 years later) he still is honeymooning. We are now in the process of inching up his basals every few weeks as we see things tapering off and numbers rising. But, even now, a site can go bad and he doesn't really go very high.

    Our CDEs/endo team believe it's because he was caught so early on and was immediately "on top of things."
     
  8. LJM

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    For the better part of the first year, DS was on 3 units of lantus at night; 8 or so units of NPH to cover the day and almost no Novolog at all---I don't think we ever used it until over 6 months or more in.

    He remained in a pretty strong honeymoon that first year then we went on pump and he needed tiny increments of basal and about 18 units a day TDD. Fastforward to now: honeymoon has ended. He is taking about 45-55 units a day.

    We had a pretty easy first 2 years thanks to a nice honeymoon; numbers did not stick high, he came down easily, etc. That does not last forever.
     
  9. frizzyrazzy

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    Ian went about 6 months taking fairly normal amounts of nph/novolog and lantus/novolog and then went into a big honeymoon where for about 4-6 weeks he was down to about 2u of lantus and mostly no novolog at meals. Tell me that didn't mess with my head....
     
  10. 3kidlets

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    My daughter was diagnosed a year ago. She left the hospital taking 13 u lantus and a sliding scale for NovoLog. Within 2 weeks, her lantus needs dropped to 9 u and 1/4 to 1/2 units of novolog. Rarely did she need a full unit and a lot of times, if she was going to be active, she would require no novolog and would be back in range within an hour or two.

    Her honeymoon lasted about 5 months until we were on vacation and she got a bad ear infection - after that her numbers got kookie and that was the end of it.
    But she had a good run of it. She was able to go to Girl Scout camp all summer and not have to take insulin.

    It was certainly much easier when she was honeymooning and it did cross my mind a few times that maybe this was as difficult as it was going to get. But when it ended, we just dealt with it. Now she is on the OmniPod and it is good. The pump makes it easy to manage and she handles it well.
     
  11. Lucky 868

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    Ann,

    We went through the same thing as parents. My son was dx last April at age 16. His insulin needs decreased greatly when we got home and returned to his usual routine, which included baseball practice every day. He is on Lantus and Humalog and as I saw his I:C ratio widen I, too, hoped the dx was wrong. What confirmed the reality of dx to me was the results of my son's C-peptide test. That shows the body is not making enough insulin.

    Currently, 10 months later, at age 17, almost 6'2" tall, weighs 142 lbs., still growing, he is still on a very strong honeymoon. Takes 8 Lantus at dinnertime and his Humalog ratio is about 1 unit per 60 grams. We have been going through a bizarre change since Christmas break - his insulin needs are decreasing. I've been having this faint hope that the dx is wrong again, but I know that is not true. As my son was less active during the break from school and his brother was home from college they played videogames constantly. One day my D son joked that he exercises by walking across the hall to the bathroom. His insulin needs should have increased at that time, but they decreased. Now back in school, baseball practice daily, regular routine, I expected his ratios to go back to what they were before Christmas. No, he increased his Lantus from 7 to 8 a couple weeks ago and the Humalog ratio is still as wide as the Grand Canyon. More than once he has gone entire day without taking any Humalog! I didn't think a diabetic could do that, but he burns through the carbs he eats at meals and still goes low, mostly in the evening. The other day he needed his Humalog at dinner and couldn't find it. My husband was getting upset about the delay for eating (told him to go ahead and eat) and I checked the chart for the last time he used his Humalog pen - turned out it was in his school backpack from the day before!

    I hope this family also has a strong honeymoon. It gives everyone time to adjust and learn. I hope this family is talking to a good CDE who can explain to them the accuracy of the dx, honeymoon period, and they can get some answers about what happens when the honeymoon ends. It was like pulling teeth for me to get any info on "post honeymoon". I learned most of what I know from this forum and reading. I have read "Think Like a Pancreas" by Gary Scheinder, which numerous people on this board recommend, and am learning about the glycemic index. I want to be ready for when the honeymoon is over and I really hope that occurs before my son leaves for college. Encourage this family to use this time to get educated.

    Cyndy
    Mom to N, 17
     
  12. Danielle2008

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    When I was diagnosed, I also had a very strong Honeymoon quite like that. I went down to 5 units of Lantus only. I did not require fast acting insulin for food (I could eat 60 grams of carbs and be fine). 3 years later, things have certainly changed.

    We thought the same things in the beginning(maybe a misdiagnoses...I summed it up to the 'denial' phase we were going through)...unfortunately, it is just a real good strong honeymoon.
     
  13. 5kids4me

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    Our son was dx'ed last April...he was on 10 units of lantus when discharged from the hospital and quickly went down to 2 units. Several times (4-5) in the first 5 months after dx, he would start running low and we would be told by endo not to give novolog unless bg was 180 or higher...Josh would go days-10 days one time,I believe,- with nothing but the 2 units of lantus. He called these periods "shot holidays".:) hasn't happened for a while now.
     
  14. GreenJenny

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    We also had and are still having a long honeymoon. My daughter was dx Nov of 09. We did not use Lantus for the first 13 months- only novolog. Her I:C ratio still goes up and down and she always returns to <120mg/dl by morning. After 15 months her basal rate is only .9u/day.
     
  15. Kayla and Ethan's Mom

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    Thanks everyone for sharing your experiences! I'll make sure that I pass these on to the family and also encourage them to come to this site for information and support. I really hope that their child will continue this honeymoon for a long time. As pp said, it will give them time to adjust to the idea and hopefully gain knowledge to help them when it does finally end.
     
  16. miss_behave

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    Definitely sounds like a strong honeymoon. In some ways I think the honeymoon period is quite cruel, sometimes leaving grieving families desperately hoping that there was a misdiagnosis and perhaps promoting some level of denial. :(
     
  17. GreenJenny

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    I agree MissBehave- I was actually happy that there were T1 antibodies found-- at least it added up.
     
  18. frizzyrazzy

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    and also, for us, the whole time prior to the "big honeymoon" when we were just in a normal honeymoon was so unpredictable - lows right after giving insulin unpredictably, so we'd reduce the insulin and then we'd have highs when we thought we'd have lows. I kept thinking "if this is the honeymoon, I want a divorce."
     
  19. buggle

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    When my son went almost off insulin, our endo made it very clear that he was not misdiagnosed. He had antibodies, a BG of 640 and an A1c over 15 at diagnosis. So, there was no question that he was type 1.

    It does play with your head when your child's pancreas kicks back in. But, I looked at it as a gift. I got this period to catch my breath and get used to diabetes. I didn't bother learning all the rules for management and we didn't weigh food, because we didn't have to. I will always be so grateful for this period.

    In our case, the super strong honeymoon lasted for a few months, went away, came back, went away, came back, etc. It's still happening at a lesser degree 3 years later. Now, his TDD varies from 7 units to 26 units a day. I've since learned that other kids here on the forum are like Brendan and still have these wonky patterns. Some kids honeymoon strongly for a while, come out and settle into a more stable TDD. And there are even a few kids who stay consistently in a strong honeymoon for an extended period. We had one kid here on the forum like that and our endo has had a couple kids who stayed at very low TDD for at least two years. So, no one can tell this family what to expect. You just go with the flow and be ready to react when things change.

    I wish this child a long-lasting honeymoon.
     
  20. Trev

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    Ahh to have a long honey moon

    I reviewed the posts, and agree that this period of low insulin requirements can last for a long duration. He is likely Type 1, caught early, and the good old islet cells are still lingering! Cheers! Diabetes is on everyones radar now a days, media, even doctors I find are screening more.
     

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