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Still learning....the baseball game from he**!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mom2cjh, Jul 12, 2012.

  1. mom2cjh

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    THOUGHT I WOULD SHARE OUR DIABETES DAY AT YESTERDAYS BASEBALL GAME....ALWAYS LEARNING....ESPECIALLY WHEN WE "FORGET" ABOUT DIABETES. EMAIL WE SENT TO THE TEAM....


    Justed wanted to apologize to everyone, especially the coaches and families sitting on the bleachers, for having to leave last night. As many of you know Cameron has Type 1 diabetes and is insulin dependent. He wears an insulin pump at all times and has to check his blood sugar around 10 times a day. Yesterday....due to many different circumstances...his blood sugar remain in the 300's (3x what ours is) for 6 hours prior to the game...HOWEVER, although I was aware of 1 high test (which is not alarming with Type 1)...I wasn't aware that since the morning when he woke up he was steadily increasing and never going down (which is alarming).
    Fast forward to the game....Tony and I were at work and Coach Mike brought him. When we got to the game he asked for drinks...when I laughed that I had them and figured he forgot to bring them...he said no that he had already drank them (my first clue to hyperglycemia...high blood sugar). It wasn't until the game was about to start that he again checked his sugar and I looked at his meter and was shocked to see the #'s high all day. He...nor Tony and I...had brought insulin to Quakertown....which we always put in his bag....but with him coming with Mike...we never thought to bring with us. At that time we knew his pump was not working and he really needed a shot of insulin to start to bring down his blood sugar. We did allow him to start playing the game because we know how upset he gets when diabetes limits what he can do at times....however, as parents we also noticed how he was playing. I am not saying so much the game...but his mannerisms, effort, body language, etc. that as a parent you can pick up. After a discussion with Cameron, we were unaware that he told Coach Mike that he couldn't play because of his blood sugar. So instead of us leaving...we sat for two innings with him not playing...knowing that we could be on our way home. I do not want any parents feeling that we were leaving because he was not playing. Had we known that Cameron actually felt bad enough to tell Coach Mike he couldn't play we would have left immediately. He was very emotional and angry during our discussion...which we felt was directed at us...but in hindsight is a symptom of hyperglycemia. It was a learning experience for our family...and reminds us of the importance putting his health first in any and all situations.
    Sorry for the lengthy email but Tony and I felt everyone...families, coaches and the other players, deserved an explanation.

    See you tonight....with normal blood sugars and INSULIN ;-)
    Stephanie
     
  2. Christopher

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    Sorry he had a tough night.

    Personally, I don't think an apology E-mail to everyone was necessary. Or if you really felt you needed to send something, it could have been a short, simple letter saying sorry he had to leave, he was not feeling well. I realize he and you wanted to explain.

    Just my 2 cents. Hope he is feeling better.
     
  3. LJM

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    I am sorry that happened. The boys feel bad when they feel their disease has caused them to let down the team.

    We do our best to "control" things but at times circumstances get the best of us and we forget something we need. Don't beat yourself up. Keep the long view in mind---this is just one blip in a long life ahead.
     
  4. mom2cjh

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    I guess it was more because I felt like given the situation...some parents who were sitting nearby and we don't know that well (somemay not even be aware he is Type 1)...may have perceived his/us leaving with him being "pulled from the game". He is a player that usually plays the entire game....with all of the diabetes chaos...no one was aware of the situation....and in hindsight them not knowing the situation...it really could have appeared that we were upset with his game playing or the coaches for "benching him".
    Regardless....they got a diabetes lesson for the game...and it was therapeutic for me:cwds:
     
  5. DsMom

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    Ughh, that stinks.:( Hope he is feeling better today...physically and emotionally. I can understand why you'd want to write the email...I see how some people may have misunderstood and you wouldn't want your son to be thought of as a poor sport. And it never does hurt to spread some education around!:cwds:
     
  6. mom2cjh

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    Thanks so much...I know just a blip!!! It was a tough night...for him and emotionally for us seeing him deal with it. I think a lot of the emotion he showed to us was because he wasn't feeling well and knew he was letting the team down....just a frustrating diabetes day. He was with his babysitter from last year....so he was super excited to see her since she is away at college...they went out to lunch, mini golf, errands....and then he quickly had to get ready for baseball. When I checked about his sugar over the phone...he told me he was high...gave an explanation....but never mentioned that he was high all afternoon. By the time he got to the game (40 minutes away), practiced and we got there...I think he was feeling pretty lousy. He slept the entire way way...got a shot in the arm once we were home....a bath and a pod change. Within an hour and his sugar down 100 points....he was a new person. Just our reminder...that diabetes is always there...and at times takes the lead.:cwds:
     
  7. mom2cjh

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    Exactly....when my husband and I were driving home...we both sort of looked at each other and realized that the people around us truly could have thought we were upset about the game. Having to see them again tonight...I just thought it was better that everyone including their children understand the situation....incase anyone thought he was leaving as a "poor sport". A little diabetes education doesn't hurt either:p
     
  8. Lisa - Aidan's mom

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    So sorry for the tough night.
    I bet he'll be a star tonight :)
     
  9. mom2cjh

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    So sweet!!! I think we will all, especially him, enjoy the game much better tonight!! Ahhh....normal blood sugars all day...makes for a much "happier" child...note to self:cwds:
     
  10. caspi

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    Is the babysitter aware that he has D? Considering he is only 10, I would think a plan would be in place, similar to school, that if he is over a certain #, you should be called. The fact that he was high all afternoon and she did not advise you of this is concerning to me. While we would like our 10 year olds to tell us everything, that's not always the case. ;) That's where the babysitter comes in.

    Just something else to consider in the future. :cwds:
     
  11. Christopher

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    Since he has had diabetes for 5 years, and she babysat him last year when he was 9, I would bet she was well aware of his diabetes. Which makes your points above all the more disturbing.
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I can't help but think that my dd would have been furious with me for making such a public declaration of her diabetes to her teammates.

    I hope they take it in the spirit in which it was intended and not as an excuse to treat your ds differently going forward.
     
  13. Christopher

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    It seems in this case that the child wanted the parent to say something, but I agree, Danielle would have flipped out if I did something like that. :D

    I also think that going into that kind of detail does open the door for other parents (and kids) to treat the child differently. That is why I suggested if they did feel the need to explain, make it very general. Sorry we had to leave but my son was not feeling well. Period. Honestly, if I, as a parent, got an email like that with all that detail, I would probably have just zoned out after the first few sentences (no offense to the OP).

    All that said, I am a Huge proponent of educating people about Type 1 diabetes, but you have to know when is the right time, who your audience is, and the ramifications of doing so.
     

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