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Staying dry overnight

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Debdebdebby13, May 23, 2012.

  1. Debdebdebby13

    Debdebdebby13 Approved members

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    I don't know if it will ever happen!

    Molly potty trained during the day time really quickly when she was a few months past 2 years old and has had no issues (she'll be 6 in a few weeks). Night time has always been a struggle though. Before diabetes she was making her way towards being dry overnight, she was dry more days than not in the morning.

    Now, ugh, it's a total crapshoot. She isn't dry in the morning very often. When she has higher BS numbers, like 200+ she'll inevitably be wet in the morning.

    For example, last night she was 168 at bedtime, then I checked before I went to bed and she was 111. I checked her in the middle of the night and she had gone up to 211 and her pull up was soaked. I changed her and then didn't do anything about the number, because I never know what is going to happen at night. When she checked her number this morning she was back down to 113, glad I didn't treat the 211.

    So anyway, tell me it will happen eventually and she won't need to take Goodnights with her to college.
     
  2. Christopher

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    Sorry you are dealing with this.

    Are you giving her Levemir twice a day?

    The reason I ask is that, unlike Lantus, Levemir usually only lasts around 12 hours, so many people need to take it once in the AM and once in the PM. Maybe if you could reduce her bg in the PM it might help with the wetting?
     
  3. Debdebdebby13

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    Yes, she gets 1u of Levemir with dinner and then .5u in the morning.
     
  4. KatieSue

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    Mine wasn't diagnosed till she was 13, but we went through this till she was 10 or 11ish. Per the Pediatrician it just happens with some kids. She was a very hard sleeper (still is) and we'd have one or more a night for weeks on end. I put a plastic cover on the mattress and we had multiple sets of sheets/blankets. Man those things were clean :D

    Helpful hint - don't get a loft bed. Good gravy that's a pain to change the sheets on multiple times in the middle of the night. Not to mention just getting up there.
     
  5. timsma

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    My boys went thru much the same thing, and till they were older than your daughter. A doctor recommended the Potty Pager to us. Both my boys were very heavy, deep sleepers as well. I was also a bed wetter until age 12 so I know how kids that have this issue feel. It's not fun and is very embarrassing. I rarely did sleep overs at friends houses due to the issue. The potty pager did the trick with both of them. I truly don't know HOW it works, but it is a miracle. I can't say enough good about it. Just google pottypager. You can't buy it in stores, only available online for some reason, but it is a life changer for sure. Buzzers don't work, nothing else worked, but this DOES work. I've recommended it to many, and it's cured each child that has been on it (except for one, and that one was more because the parents didn't really put the effort in to it, which really is minimal, very minimal). Most doctors don't know about this product, but I told our sons endo that this one actually worked, she said she had also heard great things about it and recommends it to patients now. My son with diabetes took a week to become permanently dry, and my other son took almost a month. Not one accident after 'trained' for either one of them. I used to be able to tell what Tim's blood sugars were in the mornings just based on how full his pull ups were (he wore 2 at night even). Give it a try! If you do, please post back how it worked for you. I have no connection with this company other than having used their product with awesome results!
     
  6. Kayeecee

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    Debby: Spencer was 8 and still wetting regularly, too. We had tried lots of things and someone on this site, God bless her, turned us on to the Nighthawk. She was dry within 2 weeks and 18 months later, we've never had another wet night. Google "Nighthawk" and you'll find it. Don't be put off by the sketchy-looking web site. Good luck. Once your daughter is dry you'll be so relieved; we never realized how demoralizing it was for all of us until it was over.
     
  7. DsMom

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    My son just turned 8, and I think it's been at least 6 months now since he's woken up wet. Although he was dx at 4, he still was not dry at night all the time, but we were making headway, much as you were with your child. After dx, he was wet every night, and since I was dealing with a new dx, that was really low on my priority list! I did start to get concerned when he was 5 and 6 and still wetting at night, however, I didn't go to any measures other than putting him in Pull ups and using a waterproof pad on his bed. No trying to wake him at night, no alarms. Perhaps he would have stopped sooner had I tried other measures, but he had enough on his plate, and so did I, and I didn't want him to feel bad about it. Eventually, it slowed, and has now (knock on wood) stopped...and he's not anywhere close to college!!;):p:p:p I finally took the waterproof pad off the bed a couple of months ago....good feeling for both of us!!

    Good luck. Whether you choose to be active in trying to stop the wetting, or take a wait and see attitude, she WILL stop! It can be hard to wait, for both of you, but her body will eventually be able to control itself at night.:cwds:
     
  8. Gomod71

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    I was worried my son would be in college too before he outgrew this stage! It did finally happen though in the last year (he's now 11.5).

    Have faith - it will happen. I was beginning to get really nervous and wondering if I should do something. But he too is a very, very sound sleeper. In a way it's a blessing because of his diabetes, can sleep through site changes, finger pokes, etc with nary a stir.

    Good luck!
     
  9. Debdebdebby13

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    Thanks for the encouragement! Molly is a very hard sleeper as well. My husband takes her to the bathroom before he goes to bed and she sleeps through the whole thing, she goes, but has no recollection of doing it the next day. She also sleeps through BS checks and shots.

    I will definitely look into the alarms and see if I think they would be a good tool for us.
     
  10. saxmaniac

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    We used the wireless alarm system with all three kids. I forget the brand name, but it comes with special underwear that has the wires embedded, a snap-on transmitter, and a wireless receiver that plugs into the wall.

    Our oldest (10) took about 1 week to be dry, 2 weeks to be solid at it.
    The middle kid (9, with D) took a few days, and was solid after a week.
    The youngest (5) trained in one night.

    The clip-on system did not work as well. The alarm was unreliable, too quiet, and clumsy to sleep with. Although it worked with my middle son, the oldest didn't like it.
     
  11. timsma

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    Yep. Nighthawk and potty pager, made by the same company. They didn't have the nighthawk when my sons used them though. Like you, I can't recommend them enough! We could have waited for them to outgrow it too, but didn't want to. I remember all too well what it did to my self esteem growing up with this problem and didn't want them to feel the same way, which my older one already was feeling bad. I was so happy someone told me about this product too. Truly a Godsend for us!
     
  12. Daddyto4

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    A neighbor of mine's wife is Type 2. She still has wet nights. I'm 36, and we are of comperable ages.

    Sorry.:(
     
  13. emm142

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    This is the first time I've EVER heard of this. I'd guess that this woman has some other problem besides type 2 (such as autonomic neuropathy).

    I'm fairly sure almost everyone with type 1 is entirely continent by the time they leave for college. ;)
     
  14. Daddyto4

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    Yes there are, but the point is it could still be an issue for a long time to come.
     
  15. emm142

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    It just seems pointless to waste time worrying about something so extremely unlikely. IMO, do what you can (potty pager, nighthawk, etc.) and get checked for medical problems which could cause this. Don't waste time thinking that you might have to send your kid to college in pull-ups, because, really, you just don't hear of that happening.
     
  16. Connor's Mom

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    The Nighthawk didn't work for us. We saw his Pediatrician and the meds aren't an option at this point. Not worth the possible side effects. My son is 10 and I have found that he wets through more when he goes low than when he goes high. It's the opposite of everything I knew. The wetting bothers him quite a bit so, when school is out and he is back from camp we will be dedicating some time to figuring things out. He wants to go to sleep overs and he doesn't want to wear a good night any more.
     
  17. MamaLibby

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    My 6 year old is still going through this, and it's horrible. I might have to try some of this things you all are mentioning :)
     
  18. StillMamamia

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    I would just maker her wear pull-ups at night for now, and limit, if possible, lots of drinking before bedtime. It may be related to hyperglycemia, or it may be that she's one of those kids who just can't hold too much urine or sleep so soundly they don't feel the urge to get up and pee. Honestly, I would not make a big deal about this. I have this sometimes with my 8yr old (with D). My neighbour's daughter who is 10 (no D) sometimes has accidents (she doesn't wake up at all when she needs to use the bathroom). I would speak to your endo or even ped about it, to rule out any mechanical issues. But for now, pull-ups and patience are key.

    IMO, there's a very very very small chance she'll go off to college and have peeing accidents overnight.;)

    PS - also, I am sure a lot of 5yr old still have overnight (and even daytime) accidents. Try not too worry about it too much. If you think it's BG related, speak to your endo about tweaking things. If it's something else, then your endo/ped will help you with it.
     

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