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Starving teenage son!

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by TheLegoRef, Apr 28, 2014.

  1. TheLegoRef

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    I need advice from the guys. My son is 15 and a half yrs old. He's hungry all the time, which of course is very normal for a teenage boy. But he's struggling to find snacks that are healthy, or at least not insanely high carb. Can I hear from a teenage boy, or parents of a teenage boy, what a day's food might look like? We can't exactly load up on Slim Jim's and string cheese, or his cholesterol will rise. But I think he's getting tired of carrots and cucumber between classes. Today he brought a can of tuna and some goldfish. What's your carb total for the day for a constantly hungry teenage boy?
     
  2. Christopher

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    I have a girl but in my opinion I wouldn't worry to much about the carbs. Let him eat what he wants and give insulin accordingly. If he didn't have diabetes, that is what you would do anyway, right? The only difference is that instead of his pancreas delivering the insulin, his pump is.
     
  3. rgcainmd

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    Christopher took the words right out of my mouth!

    Just please don't go all "Dave" on us! :wink:
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I have a girl but she's active and she's 16. I think there are a couple of things going on in our case, perhaps yours. First, they are just hungry, often, LOL but I also think the D kids have complicating issues that are specific to D. Both high and low blood glucose levels mess with the hunger impulse. Add to that that our kids are missing hormones like amylin and leptin, both of which help regulate appetite and "fullness". While I tend toward Chris' approach to feed her as I would have fed her without D there is no doubt in my mind that serial snacking, even with thoughtful bolusing will make bgs roller coaster which in turn messes with the feeling of hunger.

    We're really focused on providing nutrient rich snacks; Nuts, peanut butter, avocados, lean protein, hard cheeses, smoothies made with milk and berries and bananas, yogurt and fruit etc., etc. Not all low carb but filling, and in the end, that tends to raise the quality of the snacks and reduce the frequency.

    Good luck!
     
  5. TheLegoRef

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    Exactly. I didn't mean for my post to sound like I'm limiting carbs, I was just wondering what the average for a teenager is. I want him to eat healthy. If he's hungry, I'm not going to let him eat three twinkies every afternoon just because his friends do. I want him to eat something healthy. He can't go have two combo meals from McDonald's, he should have some leftover meatloaf that's not full of chemicals. I am curious about the total carbs though, because in another thread on this forum, my son had nearly the highest carb total a day. I'm just wondering what everyone else could possibly be eating, if half his meals are veggies and he's still in the 300 total sometimes.

    We also struggle with nuts, because my other son has a nut allergy, so that's a difficult snack for us. The biggest issue is the 9am and 2pm at school snack munchies - finding something he can't squish in his backpack, that is filling and not chemical filled.

    Thanks! :)
     
  6. Amy C.

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    Ideas I have:
    Popcorn
    Sandwich
    Chips
    Cookies
    Fruit
    Raisins
    Packaged drink of some sort
     
  7. KatieSue

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    I just did a quick google search on how many carbs you should consumer per day and it seems to range 200-300 with many saying 250. So his don't seem that crazy.

    I'd try to find more protein things since it seem to keep you fuller longer. Tuna is great as are a lot of the other suggestions. Have you tried any protein bars? They're easily thrown in a back pack.
     
  8. rgcainmd

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    While I'm all about eating healthier (with the exception of my Twinkie addiction, which is currently down to a maximum of three per week and falling fast), I'm in the process of more gradually improving the quality of the carbs my daughter consumes since her diagnosis in January. While I understand their reasoning, the inpatient staff during our 5-day hospitalization strongly emphasized the fact that my daughter could still eat anything she wants "except for poison and cookies-----made with poison" (their exact words) as long as we supplied the exogenous insulin needed to cover the carbs. I know this is true in a literal sense, but I also know that a diet heavy in high glycemic index carbs will make the tightrope we walk in our efforts to better control her BG very thin. That being said, I am not "going Dave" on my daughter, and I do not mean to imply that TheLegoRef would seriously consider going this extreme route either. My point is this: I believe that allowing our children to continue to have the occasional Twinkie, Drumstick, candy bar, McDonald's Big Kids Meal, Taco Hell, bowl o' Lucky Charms, etc. might be the way to go. (In our particular case, the "occasional" is still a lot more frequent than I envision my eventual goal). If I were to move more quickly towards a more "T1D-friendly diet" (which in actuality is a more "human-friendly diet" as we are all aware) I suspect that there would be some undesirable consequences, including but not limited to, my daughter resenting her T1D more than she already does (and I'm not saying that this resentment is inherently a bad thing in and of itself) and feeling as if she were being punished for having T1D, feeling even less like her "normal" non-Diet-Pepsi-swilling peers, eating yummy junk food behind my back, and reducing my current status of an overall responsible mom who is "way more awesome than a lot of the other moms" to "the meanest and worst mom in the whole entire universe." Yes, TheLegoRef is dealing with a non-newly-diagnosed, 15-year-old teen boy and I am dealing with a newly-diagnosed 11-year-old girl, but I believe the same basic ideas should be taken into consideration (and likely already are!) I also have a 24-year-old daughter and, while the extra-special challenge of T1D was not in the picture, this approach of reasonable moderation (in relation to many things in addition to diet) worked out pretty darn well.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2014
  9. peruvianpasohi

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    Why do you think his cholesterol will rise? cholesterol rises in response to insulin, kind of like eating fat doesn't make you fat, eating MORE caleries makes you gain weight. Try a month or more of high fat, with prior and followiing cholesterol levels. Ask his dr.
     
  10. RomeoEcho

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    For at school snacks, unless your kids are the same age, this might be a good time to utilize nuts since he'll be outside the home. Costco makes reasonably priced individual packs of nuts. I think they're about 2 servings per pack ~250 calories of healthy fat and protein and that way they're never open inside your house with your allergic child. I don't know how you manage the boundaries, but my home is also a food allergy home. We have some clearly marked and contained allergens like that.

    Unless you are drowning them in fat, it's tough to get teenage boy levels of calories from vegetables alone. Don't worry, his metabolism will slow down again, in another 10-15 years. :)
     
  11. mmgirls

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    Can you explain what you mean by this? I have never heard anyone say anything quiet like this but am intrigued.
     
  12. TheLegoRef

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    I don't quite understand your comment, but my son has already has had tests show he's had high cholesterol in the past. When he was MDI, he used to try to eat lots of meat (pepperoni, etc) and cheese (shredded cheddar) so he didn't have to bolus.

    We should try that. We were wary of having anything with nuts in the house because my little one was well, little. But my older one should be smart enough, and my younger one is now old enough and cautious enough, that we could try that. On to the Costco list it goes! :)

    I went to the store today, and looked for a bunch of ~20-40 carb snacks (who has time for a huge snack in those short 5 minute passing times anyway), and found some non-squishable snacks. Got some of the small cereal boxes (like Corn Pops), mini-donuts (well, those we'll have to put in a container), combos, rice cakes. Found some kid things for at home too, just for a bit of variety, like the frozen Pizza Roll things, and even a personal chicken pot pie lol! (Even though they're not really healthy.) I got the smallest tortillas, and tomorrow he's requested a mini quesadilla and sf jello for his snacks. The tuna worked out well today. :) We also got a few green peppers, which we don't get too many of, for a veggie variety.

    Any other thoughts, please share! I was never a teenage boy... lol!
     
  13. mmgirls

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    how about a tortilla wrap? tortilla and some cream cheese, meat and veggies, all rolled up?

    how about just some extra sandwiches? is he a milk drinker? do teachers have fridges in the rooms for milk and precut cheese/meats?
     
  14. RomeoEcho

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    I think the key to keeping it healthy is variety more than any individual snack item. Everything has advantages and disadvantages. Nuts, tuna, cheese, etc can all be very healthy, but in balance. I remember times where I would eat at least a can of tuna a day. Turns out that mercury adds up quickly at that rate. Hardboiled eggs are good too, they'll keep until snack time at room temperature and are filling.

    How old is your younger kid? If there is still concern of him eating things that aren't his, stick to really obvious things like plain nuts. Other ways of marking things are to have a seperate shelf for safe and unsafe snacks, using color coded labels, or just writing in really big letters all over the container. I am a fan of having home be a safe place where a food allergy kid (or adult) doesn't have to worry or feel different, but sometimes its ok, as long as it is done safely and isn't eaten around the younger child. Our kitchen is mostly safe these days, but there are a few things that have "POISON" written all over them. Amuses our guests too.
     
  15. rgcainmd

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    Just thought of this suggestion while I (almost) drifted off to sleep: half an apple cut up into slices with a sizable glob of "real" peanut butter to dip into. (None of that classic Skippy drek is welcome at our house--peanut butter should contain peanuts only IMO. Peanuts and no more than the legally allowed amount of cockroach parts is also acceptable, as I've really never been able to taste the difference between peanut butter with and without insect parts). Unfortunately, this snack could be problematic in light of your younger child's nut allergy, but it sounds like this may be doable now that your sons are older. We lurve apples with peanut butter at our house because they taste kind of like caramel apples with less guilt per carb. Your supermarket haul today sounds quite appetizing; I'd be pretty darn pleased if our pantry was similarly stocked!
     
  16. nanhsot

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    I totally understand what you mean, and it's a challenge for BOTH my teens, not just my T1. Our world is full of junk and most are high carb and empty calories, it can be difficult to find good solid things for in between meals.

    I keep a lot of lunch meat, lean sausage (Sam's/Costco sells a cooked chicken sausage that's decent), pepperoni. He eats a lot of sandwiches and I buy those flat breads that are lower carb. They like Kind bars or other protein bars, though they are expensive but good. Popcorn, fruits and more fruits (summer is here, I stock up on watermelon, canteloupe, apples, etc). Dip sliced apples in almond butter. Smoothies are a great way to fill up, we add protein powder, chia or hemp seeds to fill the hunger. Corn tortillas filled with whatever is on hand, I buy the premade fajitas or will make a cheese dip and that's easy and quick. Homemade hummus is yummy with those carrots and cucumber.
     
  17. wilf

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    As a former teen boy, I well remember the compulsion to eat anything in sight. Even doing so I was skinny as a rake. Boys grow so much - first upward, and then to fill out and add muscle.

    I would not worry about his cholesterol unless he overweight and inactive, and I would not worry about total carbs as long as they're good carbs. The one thing I would avoid or minimize is soda pop. Just make sure your house is full of healthy foods - meat (including Slim Jims), bread, eggs, dairy products (including cheese strings), fruit, veggies - he will probably eat whatever's in the house.

    Note that if my Mom had sent carrots and cucumbers to school with me I would have considered that a sick joke. At least make sure he has a tasty dip (Hummus, baba ganoush, or just a salad dressing) to eat them with, together with a hearty ham and cheese sandwich or two, some milk and a big cookie or muffin.
     
  18. rgcainmd

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    Nanhsot, would you mind sharing your hummus recipe? We were spoiled by eating the awesome hummus in Israel, and now only one (more expensive) brand here in our area of the U.S. tastes up to par. Ironically, the brand with the most Hebrew-esque name (Sabra) tastes kind of crappy (to us, at least).
     
  19. nanhsot

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    I hate commercial hummus, it's nasty! I'm posting my general recipe below but I change it to taste, for example last night I made some and added olives. I've added roasted tomatoes or red peppers, eggplant, etc. I don't alter the basics, I just toss in whatever sounds fun. I don't typically have fresh parsley on hand so either use dried or skip it altogether. The salt if you follow the recipe is a little much, so I use scant teaspoons; we like salt around here but if you don't I would half that. I have one of those ninja blender type things, quick and easy.

    1 can chickpeas, drained
    1/4 c fresh lemon juice
    2 tbs tahini
    2 tbs good quality olive oil
    small handfull of parley chopped, plus a sprig for garnish
    2-3 cloves garlic
    2 tsp salt
    1/2 teas cumin
     
  20. rgcainmd

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    Can't wait to try this. Thank you so much!
     

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