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soooo much insulin

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by momof2type1, Feb 10, 2015.

  1. momof2type1

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    I have two daughters with type 1. Oldest is now 24 diagnosed at 18. Is text book perfect, sugars never low or high no problems. My second diagnosed at 6yrs old is now 12 is another story. Sugars never right always a adjusting. Now obviously she has growth spurts and hormones coming in but she takes 50 units of lantus daily. Her carb count is 1 /5. And correction factor is once over 180 subtract 100 and divide by 20. Even wirh this she runs high alot. She does get frequent ear and sinus infections but nothing I can do about that. Anyone else have a child on this much insulin. I dont know why it freaks me out giving her this much but it does. Prob cause I dont see other kids getting this much. Even friends I have made with kids rhat have type 1. She also has celiac so not sure if this factors in. My oldest does not have celiac. So if your child also taking thiis amount please answer so I know I am not the only one. Thanks. We do not pump and use dexacom CGM.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2015
  2. momof2type1

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    Nobodies kids are taking thus much? Great now I am really concerned.
     
  3. StacyMM

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    My daughter takes a lot of insulin and she's 11. At our last visit, the endo mentioned that DD has the highest basal rates in her practice, even with all of the 18 year guys. She's the only one with an hourly rate over 3 units, which DD has several times in her basal profile. I think her lowest basal is around 1.9 and that's at night. Right now, her basal is about 60 units a day. It fluctuates with hormones (puberty and all that) but it's usually between 55 and 70. Last summer, she was actually around 80 for about a month. It may be high compared to other kids but it's what DD needs so it's what she gets. There is no limit and everyone is different :)

    Her brother, for comparison, is in the middle of a growth spurt and eats so, so much food...and his daily insulin is about the same as her basal insulin so his needs are clearly much lower. His basal is usually around 30 units a day but it's closer to 40 right now. When basketball season ends, it will probably drop back down.
     
  4. momof2type1

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    Thanks, I know its weird but I feel better knowing other kids are using higher amounts, or I quess needing higher amounts us a better way to put it.
     
  5. Megnyc

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    There are kids who need a lot of insulin during puberty. That said, it sounds like you are having issues with high numbers. There are meds such as metformin, symlin, and victoza that can be used to reduce insulin needs as well as aid in stabilizing (to a certain degree) blood sugars. I have used both metformin and symlin with great success. Ped endos sometimes hesitate to prescribe them but everyone I know who has tried them has ended up very pleased. I currently use symlin and my A1C is in the low 5s with relatively minimal effort. But I got my first period 5 years ago (I'm 21 now) so I am well beyond completely done with puberty so my results would not necessarily apply to your daughter.

    The perspective here tends to be that kids need what they need in terms of insulin. I agree with that to a certain extent but I do think it should be mentioned that having type 1 does not preclude the development of insulin resistance and type 2. It isn't really possible to figure out what is going on since it sounds like the amount of insulin she is on is not controlling her blood sugar and you did not include her weight. If you could calculate the total amount of insulin she would need daily to keep her blood sugars in range more often than not (think an A1C of 7) and then divide that by her weight in kilograms. If that is greater than 1.5, personally I would be a bit concerned and would have a chat with her endo about insulin resistance and at what point it would make sense to address that.

    Good luck! If you have questions about the use of symlin or metformin feel free to PM me. I would be happy to discuss specifics with you since it is not necessarily an easy decision to make.
     
  6. momof2type1

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    Thanks, I might end up PM you. Our endo just stated about insulin resistence. I am going to ask about metaformin. She is 5`6 and 145 so not over weight. But from reading and researching seems like puberty hormones can make your insulin less effective.
     
  7. Johan'smom

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    My son is 16 and growing taller by the day (over 6 ft now....) He is on 60 units of Lantus and a novalog ratio of 1:4. You are not alone.
     
  8. KHS22

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    My little one when diagnosed was only on about 1.5 unites/day for a long time. Then, honey moon was ending and needs were going up up up. I was freaking out too. I remember talking to her endo, and he said "She needs what she needs". And I always repeat that mantra. There is nothing "good or bad" or "right or wrong" about how much insulin someone takes. They need what they need!!! That helps me if her needs are increasing, I take a deep breath and just say she needs what she needs!!

    Good luck
     
  9. Christopher

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    Like most things related to Type 1 diabetes, it is better to not try and compare your child to other children. They each need what they need and, as you have seen with your own two children, they are very different and unique.
     
  10. kiwikid

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    I also have 2 girls with type 1. My eldest is 18 and uses around 25 units per day. The youngest is 13 and uses about 60 units per day. I think it is just the massive amount of hormone at the moment and am hoping it settles down soon.
     
  11. nebby3

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    My dd (12) uses similar amounts to your younger dd. I actually take comfort in your post because I see your older dd's good numbers as proof that it does get easier post puberty. I have heard that teens need way more than adults.
     
  12. rachabetic

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    When I was 12/13 years old I would use around 80-110 units a day depending on what I was eating. Now I'm 23 and use about 50 units a day. So it does definitely fluctuate and usually increase during puberty.
     
  13. GChick

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    Different people are different... and quantity of insulin itself does not generally indicate level of control, so dont worry too much about quantity itself, just about whether or not she is "fairly controlled" with the quantity given.

    Having said all that, if it helps... while things were most certainly "different" when I was a teenager (and I was 100% NOT overweight), I remember when I was in the midst of puberty etc. needing +/- 60 units/day and always running high.

    Now in my 30s (and unfortunately ever so slightly overweight) I need
    +/- 40 units/day if I am eating absolutely horribly
    +/- 30 units/day if I am eating more "balanced"
    +/- 25 units/day if I am dieting (or just eating ~really~ well)
    no matter how you look at it, considerably less than my teen years.

    and with this, my doc is always arguing with me that I am generally running too low

    So it may balance itself out over time.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2015
  14. ShelbysMom

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    I just asked a similar question in parents section bc my daughter is requiring so much insulin right now....she's at about 2u/hr sometimes a little more. So, no, you are definitely not alone:)
     
  15. akhall14

    akhall14 New Member

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    Thank you, this is so good to know!
     
  16. Gracie'sMom

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    Grace is 14 (will be 15 next month) and is on a pump using Humalog. She uses 120-130 units per day. The last week it has been less. Keeping my fingers crossed that it is starting to go down. The endocrinologist says she's on "more insulin than anyone should need to control their blood sugars," but feels it's just hormones. At diabetes camp the kids were all teens, all eating the same carbs and not blousing for blood sugars and she was getting 4x the insulin of most of the other teens!!! I know how you feel! Frustrating!
     
  17. Christopher

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    I don't think this was a very good thing for the Endo to say. For people that don't have Type 1 we have no idea how much insulin is secreted by our bodies when we eat. And for those people who do have Type 1, they are going to need different amounts at different times in their lives. And each person will need something different than the next person. That is why I hate to see parents comparing things like this. There is no "right" amount of insulin and using more than the next person is not "bad".
    An individual needs what they need. Period.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  18. quiltinmom

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    Unless he said it in a joking/sarcastic way. It's okay to say things like that if all in the room understand the meaning intended by it. If he said it in a serious way, I agree with you--it shouldn't be said!

    I think this post is less about comparing, more a matter of gauging where we are in the scheme of things. Finding out where average is can be helpful in knowing if further help should be sought from a doctor, or if everything is most likely normal. Hopefully it's about knowing what we should expect, not about feeling bad because our DS or DD is using so much more insulin than someone else.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2015
  19. Christopher

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    True, I can see your point, but I did not read it as the Endo was joking. But who knows.

    And yes, I also see what you are saying about comparing, but I still don't thing there is an "average" or even a "normal" with Type 1 diabetes. There are so many variables.
    And my point really was that even though people don't intend to compare and don't intend to feel bad if their child is not like the others, it happens sometimes. But hey, that's life, right? :smile:

    But I do appreciate that it is good to see where others are at as a GENERAL gauge.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2015
  20. Gracie'sMom

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    My DD uses 100-130 units per day. That is her daily range in most given weeks. I agree that they need what they need, but we are having negative effects from having so much insulin on board . . . such as lows that last hours. Also insulin resistance can lead to weight gain. Right now she has no weight issues but she just "finished" puberty so the endo wants to avoid that. We just started symlin last week, just at dinner so far. So far I am impressed. She uses half the insulin she normally would for dinner and her numbers are about the same. Keeping my fingers crossed.
     

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