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Soo frustrated with my childs school!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by crown of life, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. crown of life

    crown of life Approved members

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    My sons started kindergarten this year and its a full day rather than the 1/2 day they had in 4k. So now begins the part of having to give my son insulin at school.
    He started the pump which will make things easier, but nobody is familiar or educated with the pump and we had one meeting which was rushed and 2 days before school started. The nurse was present although informed us earlier on the phone (she was almost in tears) that she will be quiting because she is a licensed nurse who legally can only be in charge of 750 kids at a time, and there is well over a 1000. The school kept promising her they would hire another nurse for help, but recently hired the coach/vice principal of the high school to be the principal of the middle school, which the middle school never had a principal to begin with and wasn't in need of one. Not to mention he makes much more money as a principal than the nurse does. (This is a tiny school in a tiny town, where the High school, middle, and elementery all are connected) So now we officially do not have a nurse at all 3 schools, and the principal and secetary have already informed me they wouldn't be administering a needed glucagon shot instead they would call ambulance.
    We had a problem with recieving his pump supplies and are still waitng for more and couldn't keep relying on the hospital to supply us with samples. (a whole other prblem I won't get into) but we decided along with the doctor to put him back on lantus and injections until we are fully supplied correctly. (my poor child). So now the first 2 days of school until whenever or when they are comfortable giving a bolus or shot either me or my husband come to the school at lunch time to give his insulin.
    On friday my mom and husband picked them up to realize my D-son left his lunchbox somewhere only to find it in the lunch room. The janitor handed it to him and told him he ate his candy bar. And my son got so upset because he forgot to eat it at his lunch. My mom thought the janitor was only teasing him, but apparently he wasn't. I am upset because he had his insulin and his carb/meal counted out with appropriate insulin given which someone is suppose to make sure he ate his lunch, or make up for the lost carbs in some way. But nobody checked, apparently since nobody even knew where his lunch box went, along with the scummy (i only imagine hes scummy) janitor ate his kit kat which was also counted into his meal plan, which maybe could have affected him. Or what if my son was so exctied about recess he ate 2 bites and left his lunch box to run outside and nobody was paying attention. He ate enough obviously but it could happen when nobody is paying attention.
    I am not at all happy or comfortable with my kids in school or about the fact that not one person in that school is educated about diabetes, and I am responsible to teach and train them since they irresponsibly lost thier nurse to gain an unnessesary ex-football star of the town/coach principal who they never needed in the first place!
    SOOO aggravated. I need to know what I should do or not do, and what my options are. I would sue all of them if I could. I don't have any confidence in this uneducated farm town who is used to teaching whatever generation came from the last generation they taught. (we aren't from around here in case you couldn't tell)
    Help! And thanks for reading my venting aggravation!
     
  2. Momto3

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    Does your son have a 504 Plan and Health Care Plan? If not, I'd start by requesting one so you can have, in writing, all the things you need to make your son's experience at school the best it can be.

    As far as the pump goes, could you go in at lunch time for a few days to train the nurse/replacement nurse on how to use the pump? I did that for our two nurses, who both attended our pump training. It helped them feel more confident and I was there to answer any questions.

    Good luck!
     
  3. AlisonKS

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    ack! Is there another nurse in the district that works with a different school that can train? She will be quitting, so she hasn't yet? Can't she train and delegate other staff?
    My son is 6, so he can't be responsible for keeping track of his kit or food, so we have it written down who handles the kit when travelling around campus, and who will check to make sure he finished his meal.
     
  4. Becky Stevens mom

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    This man stole your child's candy bar?!?!?!?!?!:eek::mad: What kind of weirdness is that !!?!?!?!?!? He shouldnt have even opened the lunch box except to try and figure out who it belonged to. If this is a public school you can definitely get a 504 plan written up and then the school will be responsible to make sure that there is someone trained in all aspects of diabetes care and that someone assists your child with eating all the food that is counted and bolused for.

    I still cant get over the fact that that man ate your kids food:confused:
     
  5. Lisa P.

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    You had me until "uneducated farm town". Hope you can find the goodness in the place you live, there are pros and cons to every culture, and if you can't I hope you find a new place to live where you can respect the people around you.

    I moved to a rural area on purpose, I find the large "educated" areas did a horrible job of caring for my child. Apparently masters degrees in education do not automatically make you great teachers, even of children whose parents have PHDs in other things. :eek:

    The story sounds like something has been lost in the translation. I'm skeptical enough to believe someone might swipe a kid's candy, but then telling him? Something's weird. I'd talk to the school and find out how the day actually went. Once you have the full clear story you may still be unhappy with how they did, or you may find it was all right after all. Maybe you could sit in on class for the first next day and see how things go? Observe?

    Good luck!


     
  6. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    You need to print this and read this http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ful...um=6065&GAID=10&LegID=51897&SpecSess=&Session

    and to go to the sticky about laws and schools posted by Frizzyrazzy and read all of the IL information.

    The school is not meeting its obligations, either through ignorance of the law or out right disregard of it. Read, print, share and advocate for your son. The law is on your side.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2011
  7. pianoplayer4

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    iIm sorry but Ithink your wrong about the whole "uneducated farm type" thing, coming from a very rural area where there are lots of farmers, I'd say they are no less educated because they decided to provide food for our nation instead of working in an office. It sounds like you need to gain a little more repspect for the people around you.
    Set up another meeting and demand that they be more careful, complain about the janitor stealing your sons candy, get a 504 to ensure your sons safty. But dont fault them for having no clue about d, most people don't until it slaps them in the face and they have to learn. I sure had no idea how demanding d could be until I was dx, so give them a chance to correct their mistake.
     
  8. Flutterby

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    Gosh the school is so backwards here. THEY are RESPONSIBLE for taking care of your son while he is at school that includes having someone counting carbs, dosing insulin, giving glucagon and everything else that comes with diabetes. I would check into your state laws asap. I'd also call the person that is in charge of the 504s for your school and I'd put in a formal complaint about the janitor eating your son's candy bar..


    The school is doing so many things wrong here.. They can not require you to go to the school to dose his insulin.. wrong on so many levels.. Learn the laws in your state, call the head of 504s and call the ADA asap... also, I would call the office of civil rights in your area.
     
  9. Flutterby

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    I did some looking.. follow the link, at the bottom of page 9, you will see a statement saying that the school CAN NOT force you to administer medication to your child, the school is responsible.. you need to print this off and let the school know that you know the laws and your child's rights, they are to get someone to give insulin to your son. If you read up towards the top it also says that administration has to give medication if the nurse isn't available.. the teachers can not be forced, but the Principal and vise Principal don't have the choice. It also says on page 10 that no school employee shall not be prohibited from giving emergency medications.. that includes glucagon.
    Page 9, letter E.

    http://www.diabetes.org/assets/pdfs/state-school-laws/il_guide_medication_administration.pdf
     
  10. lynn

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    Farm communities are hard to break into, aren't they? I grew up in one and didn't realize how hard it was for the people who moved in and were still considered new ten or fifteen years later. I now live in a different one, have for almost ten years, and we are still newcomers.

    I wish you luck with getting the help you need for your son. The families you are living among have likely lived with each other for generations. They know each other, love each other, and watch out for each other. I would suggest that you don't give them the impression you are "against" one of them.
     
  11. MomofSweetOne

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    This is a case where you really need to talk to the ADA and know your rights. Talk to a legal counsel if you need to. I've taught - in Illinois - in the public school system, and parents have far more rights than they typically know. It is downright dangerous for them to tell you that they won't administer a glucagon. At worst, they're playing with the death of a child they are legally responsible for, and at best, the child's brain is starving under their care. School districts deal with children far more medically involved: feeding-tubes, diapers, etc. If I were you, I would contact every school board member (you'd be amazed at how little they really know about what goes on in the district), your IL and national congressmen (they receive state and federal funds, after all), etc. about the risks the school is willing to take with your child's health. If they start thinking in terms of law-suit for negligence or negative publicity, you'll have a nurse or at least a trained aide watching over your child's care in short order. Maybe they'll decide an certain administrator is incompetent and hire several with his salary.

    http://www.diabetesnet.com/about-diabetes/diabetes-complications/why-are-only-certain-organs-damaged
     
  12. PatriciaMidwest

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    Sorry you are dealing with this. You need to get a health plan written up and a 504. Request a 504 meeting now because it may take some time to hammer everything out. Have your endo right up orders so your health plan can be followed now, even before the 504 is in place.

    Your school cannot require you to manage your child's T1 during school hours. You can volunteer to do this, but they cannot require it.

    As others have said, the law is on your side.

    p.s. I can't imagine a middle school that doesn't need a principal :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2011
  13. crown of life

    crown of life Approved members

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    Thank you

    I really appreciate all of your research and advice. THe school got a new nurse who I had a meeting with and she seemed really interested in my son, and the school made it clear to her that he was a priority among the other parts of her to do list for the school. She was writing everything down when I talked to her, kind of like a psychicatrist, and even asked if there was any way she could attend or have a pump training class. She seemed like an angel. However... this last week she quit. I have no idea why or what happened, and I am sure the school won't tell me. I might guess it could have something to do with why the last nurse left, and how her license can't be responsible for over 750, when there is about 1000 students, and school staff all are under her license. So techincally speaking she could lose her license for trying to be responsible for that many kids. They need 2 nurses. Maybe one for the high school/middle school and elementary. But to my annoyance mentioned earlier they hired an unnessary vice principal for the middle school who is also the coach, when they never up until now needed a vice principal or even had one, who according to the first nurse who quit confided in me as she's almost in tears makes much more money than a much needed nurse.
    Right now we are still going up every day at school to bolus Charlie. We are pretty good friends with everyone there since my husband and I see them on a regular basis. We have no bad blood so to speak. So I apologize to anyone who was offended at my comment on "uneducated farm town" since I was only speaking out of frustration. I do not think my self better or more educated than anyone part of this town. My husband is also on the fire department here now for a year, and it's kind of hard to not be immersed in the community we live in while he is a fireman here, and everyone knows him as well as us. It's nice to have people looking out for one another and excepting us as new, but having moved from chicago it is something to get used to when you see the same people everyday and they know your name, and probably more about you than you realize. I am not comfortable with that yet.
    The good news is we have a scheduled appointment on Friday for the animas educator and nurse from another district and maybe someone else coming to the school to teach everyone what they should know about charlies pump and things they NEED to know and NEED to do. I am happy with the fact that everyone loves my twins, even while they were in half day 4k, (not as much drama then) everyone in the school new them, since they are impossible to ignore. They hug everyone and melt all the teachers. So I am glad they are treated right despite the lack of...lets just say a few things..;)
    All in all thank you for all your advice and we have the ball rolling on these important/legal adjustments that needed to be made. :D
     
  14. Lisa P.

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    Goodness, I know all about speaking out of frustration!
    I also understand culture shock!
    I'm glad things are smoothing out, it's a terrible shame they can't get their act together regarding nursing care, it seems to me this is probably a legal issue that it sounds like will need to be resolved legally since you've tried to go the reasonable route. Hope you get some good help soon for your cute boys!
     
  15. SuzanneE

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    You Need a Section 504 Plan

    I'm so sorry to hear you're having such trouble with your son's school. I know from personal experience how aggravating and disheartening it is. The Illinois legislation that Sarah suggested is a good reference but has no specific authority in Wisconsin; the federal law that informs it, though, does apply (see the Rehabilitation Act, Section 504).

    What you need to do is (1) call the school district and request a meeting to evaluate your son's needs and implement a Section 504 plan to provide the health services needed during the school day and at school related activities; (2) Before the meeting, prepare a health plan with your son's doctor and give copies of it to the district personnel at this meeting.

    Also, if you haven't already, I'd download this guide and bring it to your 504 meeting. This guide is specific to students with diabetes in Wisconsin and may help you and your school sort things out. http://http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/publications/P4/p43063.pdf In Wisconsin, school personnel can be trained to administer prescription medications as long as the child's physician and parents consent.

    The bottom line is this: Federal law entitles your son to attend school and receive health related services he needs to stay safe, healthy and in school. Wisconsin law permits nurses and other school personnel to provide this care, including the administration of insulin and Glucagon. State this explicitly in your Section 504 plan: In the event of an emergency, minutes matter. Administer Glucagon and call 911. Calling 911 by itself is not an appropriate emergency response.

    As for the janitor, make sure he gets a one-sheet summary of your son's care plan, the kind you might give to a bus driver. Kindly and privately inform him that your son's lunch and snacks are measured to match his insulin intake and that depriving him of needed carbohydrates could cause him to become hypoglycemic. Sometimes, just connecting the dots in a matter-of-fact way is enough to rattle people into more conscientious behavior.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2011

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