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Some schools post have me questioning our current situation

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by lohmggcjr, Sep 28, 2014.

  1. lohmggcjr

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    My daughter is 8 and in second grade. Going on two years dx. She goes to the nurse for all her needs and the nurse will come to her if she needs. As far as I know the nurse has never come to her, she and a buddy walk down to the nurse. This year I was going to try and have her test in the classroom before going anywhere, treat simple lows in the classroom to try and cut back on the amount of time she is at the nurses office. I was told that she couldn't do this because of air born blood pathogens, lancets being sharps, and a distraction. No other elmentary kid(in her school) does it the way I was suggesting.

    I was informed kids dont do this sort of thing until middle school (7th grade). I am pretty sure all the things I was given as reasons why she can't are false. I really wasn't ready start a fight. I don't know all the ins and outs of her "rights". I just said ok and we have a different plan. She does however have and extra kit in her room incase of emergency. Her nurse and I have a really good relationship and I just didnt want to rock the boat. My daughters school is very small, and her nurse can get to her easily, so I am told. I asked what happends during a lock down, and was told the nurse was able to to get to her. there are 4 kids total with D. Im sure a handful or more with other medical issues. I'm not sure what would happen if there were two emergencies at one time. When I have brought up my concerns, I have gotten reasons mentioned above, anlong with reassurances that the nurse will be able to give medical help if needed.

    Am I happy with the plan?as of this moment, yes but probably because there has never been a major issue to cause concern at this point. I would like for her to take on a tad more responsibility. I feel like she is mature enough to do it. I want her to start feeling more comfortable with her making her own descions on her care. If her dex is alarming, she should be able to test and treat a simple low. If it is HiGh, I understand it is bit more complicated and there some factors to take into consideration before making a descion and she isn't quite ready to handle that on her own. Lows are pretty basic. Test and treat. She should be able to handle that at this point. Plus, I would like to her to be more aware. If she has to always go to an adult, she is not really understanding what needs to be done, because some one is doing it for her. At home, we are working on it. But if there is someone else to deal with the problem she would just rely on them, vs. dealing with it on her own. She is getting older, going to friends, future D camps are all going to be coming up and she really needs to start doing more. Mind you, I am always ther and am happy to assist her, but we are at a point that I know she needs to stop constantly using me as a crutch. The only way I know how to get to be confident in her choices is to teach her more of the basics other then testing and entering carb amounts. At home, she is also learning how to read carb labels.

    Any input on how to approach the school again on her testing in the classroom? She will still go to the nurse for lunch boluses or if low require more then one treatment.
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    What state do you live in?
     
  3. lohmggcjr

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    ohio. I looked the ADA website, but didnt find anything other then they are allow to carry supplies and test/treat, when necessary based on maturity and written doc/parent instructions. I was looking for something to hand to the school disproving thier argument about blood born pathogens and lancets being weapons.
     
  4. rgcainmd

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    I'd definitely check into your legal rights, which to a certain extent, differ depending on the state in which you live. The whole "blood-borne pathogens" in elementary school thing is ludacrous; what, blood-borne pathogens are magically no longer an issue once she's in middle school? I guess no one is allowed to have a nosebleed, either. Another parent addressed the sharps issue elsewhere. If I remember correctly, she said something along the lines of "if a lancet isn't allowed because it's a 'sharp', then they can't allow scissors, hairpins, sharpened pencils, etc.". IMHO, your daughter's school is ignoring your rights big time.
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    The "permitted to test and treat" IS the norm. You won't find anything in the state law or school district wide policy that disproves the school's moronic position. Just ignore that argument because no one in their right mind is going to put that in writing.

    Get your endo to sign off on the option to test and treat ( personally I would still want an 8 year old to do most of their D stuff in the nurses office) in the classroom, print up any and all state laws/policies and request a meeting.
     
  6. lohmggcjr

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    I will talk with her doc at the next appointment coming up this week. The dex starts going off at 80, she has to leave the classroom and test and treat. Maybe I could just have her treat without testing. If she is still symptomatic and alarming after 20 mins, then have go to the nurse? This could reduce the amount of time spent away from the classroom. Which she hates because she misses out on things ,like the movie the other day.
     
  7. Lori_Gaines

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    I am a high school teacher, and we allow all of our type 1 kids to test and treat right there in class. I had one in my class last year, and it was never even an issue. Of course, being a parent of a type 1 myself... :)
     
  8. caspi

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    I did some digging and in Ohio, a new law went into effect on 9/11/14 allowing students to perform diabetes tasks in the classroom with the approval of parents and physician. See 3313.7112 Section H (1): http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3313.7112

    Hope this helps. :)
     
  9. virgo39

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    I think this is a good interim step.
     
  10. lohmggcjr

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    Thanks. I found this earlier and I'll print it out. Since we started in Aug. This could be why I was told, what I was back in aug.I am still trying to see if there something that explains well the reasons to disprove their pervious stance. I'd feel better if i can site something, so i dont sound like a rambling idiot of met with resistance.
     
  11. caspi

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    Their previous stance is a non-issue now. Testing in the classroom, with the approval of the parent and doctor, is now law and they can't say no.
     
  12. dpr

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    I'm glad your state law changed. My daughter is 8 and in 3 grade. At our school here in California she has been testing treating and bolusing for lunch in class since kindergarten. But we also have friends at other schools with lots of problems so it seems to go school by school. In my opinion not testing and treating in class is not safe or right. The blood thing is complete BS and borders on and probably crosses the line of discrimination.
     
  13. Austins mom

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    My son is 8 and in third grade, his aid comes to his classroom for snack, to test, treat etc. She even meets him in the lunchroom and does his count and gives insulin so he wont miss recess! We are so completely happy with our school district, it took some training for them on my part and I realized that in our case it wasn't that they didn't want to help, it was that they were unaware of what he really needed and how they could help!!
     
  14. MEVsmom

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    the Dex is not part of my daughter's official plan at all. We handle it like this. If the Dex alarms low then my second grade daughter just eats a starburst or jolly rancher or whatever to bring her self up a bit. Having to leave class, over treat a low, and wait 15 minutes is ludicrous. She is in an acedemic gifted class and has a time management issue, so I don't want her missing any more than necessary. At lunch and snack, the nurse comes to her and they test in the hallway. She does it all and the nurse is just there to observe and document. If my daughter is not feeling well or can't get the low up, she is free to go see the nurse. This has worked well for us.
     

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