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Sick Day Training

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Jeff, Nov 5, 2017.

  1. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 1995
    Messages:
    1,519
    Questions for parents of older kids:

    How often do you review sick day protocols with your teen or young adult?

    Do you review ketone testing (urine or blood)?

    If your child uses an insulin pump, do you have pens or syringes for back up in case of unexpected high blood sugars?

    Thanks for sharing.
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,663
    Every time she doesn't feel well. We've been through sick day classes twice at the endo, the second at her request.

    "I feel nauseous", etc. are key words for pulling out the ketone meter. She's now reporting ketone levels at the same time she tells me she's not feeling well. We use a blood ketone meter. It helps a lot with attitude and use.

    Yes to insulin and syringes in her purse, at least most of the time. We do not have a Lantus prescription, though. In event of t-slim failure, she would switch to the pod.
     
  3. kim5798

    kim5798 Approved members

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    May 7, 2009
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    We have reviewed quite a bit. Ketone testing, we had a reminder last year when she had a kidney infection with near normal blood sugars...and ketones off the chart when she finally checked at my insistence!
    She does carry pen or vial/syringe as a backup, esp when not in her usual day to day routine. She is supposed to carry ALL the time. I suspect not.
     
  4. Mimikins

    Mimikins Approved members

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    Jun 22, 2014
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    My situation might be a bit different, because I was diagnosed in my late teens and didn't have my parents extensively involved in diabetes management (they know the super basic stuff). I've given them a simple flow chart that I've made that tells them what to do should they find me unconscious (check BG levels, but if not assume that I am low, how to give glucagon, calling 911, giving cake gel if I am able to take food, etc.), but they don't know much besides that.

    I review sick day protocols with my endo, though usually it's on an as-needed basis. I know some of the basics (frequent ketone checking, hydration, closely monitoring BG levels or using a CGM, acetaminophen-related reactions with Dexcom, vomiting is not fun with diabetes), but in terms of super specific dose adjustments or if I have no idea what I'm doing I will usually give my endo a call or email if I can wait 24-48 hours for a response or use my endo's office hotline if it's more of an emergent situation where I need feedback now but not so emergent that I need to go to the ER. I got food poisoning a few weeks ago while eating out (really my first time with a vomiting-related issue and T1), and I had to use my endo's hotline when my blood sugar was in the 50s and dropping and I was having a hard time keeping liquids down (I had alcohol with that meal and wasn't 100% sure glucagon would work if I needed to start doing mini dosing). For general cold management, usually I am able to take care of it without needing to notify my endo immediately (if needed, I might just give them a quick FYI email).

    My parents know very little about ketone testing -they only know ketones are bad. My personal rule is to ketone check any time I'm unsure of whether I'm getting my insulin (even if I am 200 and steady after a site change -I've had bent cannulas and ketones at that BG level). If I'm sick, I'm also checking ketones about every 4-6 hours. Most of the time, I'm usually the one explaining to my parents what the ketones might mean and if they should be worried.

    I am a pack mule. I keep everything with me. I get a ton of pump issues, so I keep plenty of syringes on me with my current Novolog vial in my meter case. I also like keeping syringes available if I need to give mini glucagon. For longer pump issues, I keep a vial of Levemir in the fridge and will usually take it with me for longer day trips and vacations (my family likes to do really long day trips where we drive 6-7 hours one way, spend time with family for a few hours, and then drive back home the same day).

    (Boy, I haven't been on this forum in forever. -Hopefully- six more months of hell until I graduate!)
     

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