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Should we start pumping? Please help!!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by ashadams, Nov 16, 2011.

  1. ashadams

    ashadams Approved members

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    Hi everyone.

    I brought my 3 year old son to his three month check up yesterday. We are having problems regulating his blood sugars. They just seem to stay all over the place! The doctor mentioned pumping with the one touch animas pump. I am willing to do whatever it takes to make life easier for us and to regulate Javeyn's sugar, but I am afraid! :(

    I am not quite sure how he will handle the fact that he has something attached to him at all times. Any thoughts or experiences that can help me??
     
  2. lisamustac

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    My son started pumping at 2. I pushed for the pump because he was a non stop eating toddler and couldn't hold him down 10x a day for shots. Never mind giving less then 1/2 a unit was also challenging. When I first saw the pump on his little body I felt devastated ( maybe i made the wrong decision etc...)
    That being said 2.5 years later of pumping and I can't imagine going back. They get used to wearing it and becomes like part of their body.
    I find the pump useful in so many ways. Temporary basals for when he's running around the park, different basals throughout the day. Extended bolus for high fat foods....and the list can go on :)

    I think it's really something you should consider. The freedom and flexibility it gives a younger child is amazing. Good luck with any decision you make :)
     
  3. BittysMom

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    I'm interested in the responses you get as well. I just went to my 5yr old daughter's 3 month appointment too and we discussed pumping. I have some "mental" issues with the pump that I need to overcome, but I do feel we should start soon because I think the accuracy of small doses would be helpful.
     
  4. sooz

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    I think it is a very personal decision. The fact that his BS numbers are all over the place might not change with a pump. He has diabetes! He is a toddler! You do the best you can with his eating I am sure, but he is a toddler! He is growing and I am sure his eating is not consistent so don't beat yourself up. The thing that will make life easier with the pump is that if he eats a lot of small meals throughout the day, or snacks a lot, you just push some buttons and he is covered, no extra shots! We chose the Omnipod as our pump because we liked the tubless aspect of it. It is hard to think that they will have something attached at all times, I felt the same way. Hailey also wears bilateral hearing aides and I wear glasses, and I think the best way to think about the pump is that it is just one more thing to help provide something that needs help to work, like the hearing aids and the glasses.

    The ultimate decision is yours, in the mean time work with your endo to get your basal insulin correct, that might be the key to helping the numbers become more stable. Good luck!
     
  5. MomofSweetOne

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    Read the other Lisa's post.:eek: There's not a right or wrong answer for pumping. It's what works for each family. We did MDI succesfully for 13 months and switched to a pump for the differing basals because of puberty. It has been an adjustment, and sometimes I long for the simplicity of MDI (before hormones went nuts). But, my daughter told me recently that it would be really, really hard to go back to MDI. Even this morning, we were trouble-shooting a swim birthday party plans if her site comes out in the pool. She doesn't want to insert a set with other kids around, so I said she could use a syringe and we could do the set when she gets home. She looked aghast at that idea.:rolleyes: (Our first line-of-attack to Hypafix the exisiting site very well!)

    I appreciated our doctor/CDE/team encouraging us to check out all the pumps, not just one. The choice of pumps is as individual of choice as whether to pump or stick with MDI. Most people with younger children like the Ping, but some have chosen the integrated Medtronic Revel.
     
  6. MomofSweetOne

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    This is why my daughter was resistant to the pump for the first year and didn't like when people would push the idea. Once she trialled it, she decided she could deal with it. There are times that she gets frustrated when the cording gets wrapped up in seatbeats, etc. but she doesn't seem to be bothered by it once it's untangled.

    My husband and I had a harder time adjusting to the sight of the pump. Suddenly she was attached to something that announced "I'm a sick child." I hated it. But, I no longer think about it; the pump is just our new tool that makes mealtimes much less frazzled and gives us cool graphs of what's happening inside her. No more wondering constantly. ;)
     
  7. Butterfly Betty

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    It's really a decision that you have to make for your son. We just started pumping with one-touch pimp, like three days ago, and already love it. BUT, we're still adjusting to changes. Now, my little one is older than yours, she's nine. When she was first diagnosed almost a year ago, she was adament that she wasn't going to pump, it scared her to think of herself being attached to something. Then she went to diabetes camp and came home singing a whole different tune!

    She was adament about getting on the pump, so we have. She's always been in control of everything we do, does her own checks, gave herself her own injections from day one, inserted her first site. So, I felt she was ready. Clearly at three, yours can't do that.

    I will say that injust the few days, we're seeing an inprovement in her numbers, especially at night.
     
  8. haleysmommy8

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    Hi, I wanted to let you know that we had ''mental'' issues with it also. It is normal. We thought about whether it would malfunction, if it would give her to much insulin etc... But I will tell you that my daughter has had diabetes for almost 7 years (she is 8). And her first couple years were horrible until we got the pump. And we have been using minimed pump for 5 years now and it makes a world of difference. (In our lives). I can't speak for anyone else. Just thought I'd help:)
     
  9. Ndiggs

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    Olivia was just 2 when she was diagnosed and we started pumping at about 3 and a half. We would not go back to MDI at all unless it was necessary for her health for some reason. We have so much more freedom, and she can be more of a "kid" on the pump since we can give her smaller doses of insulin, and adjust it more to her needs.

    Its also nice to be able to quickly figure out how much insulin she has onboard so if she decides halfway through dinner she wants more of something, we just add the carbs in and the pump does the rest. We also like the small changes in basel amounts, very easy to make adjustments as she grows and small ones at that.

    We chose the Ping for our family as the remote bolus from the meter is nice with a toddler, and I like the color screen at night if I put in a temp basel or anything like that.

    Its really a choice your family needs to make, when we started my wife was not 100% for it, after a month or two she kept asking me why we did not do it sooner (pump start that is). That being said, if I had the choice to make again, I would get the pump 99/100 (we travel a lot and flying can be a little bit more interesting with the pump than just shots with the TSA).

    Does your Endo have a program where you can try a pump with just saline for a few days? We did that not only to see how she would like it, but to see how the insulin she got for bolus from the pump compared to shots. After the first day of her showing everyone her pump, she forgot she had it on. She still likes to show off her pink pump sometimes, especially if we are out and run into someone else with a pump, but shes four, and proud to have a pump now like the big kids.
     
  10. danismom79

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    What insulin regimen is he on? There may be ways to manage better on MDI while you make your decision. Your endo should be helping you in this moment.
     
  11. Ndiggs

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    Oh I forgot to add, her sugars were all over the place too, and a lot of that was minimized on the pump. She was on levimier and it never seemed to last beyond 16-18 hours in her, so we would split the dose and get real weird patterns. With the basel on the pump it got much better, we still get crazy days, but they are much rarer now
     
  12. BittysMom

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    Thanks, that is helpful. :)
     
  13. ashadams

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    I agree. He always wants to eat and drink. I feel like I am telling him nothing else every 5 minutes! But he is a very active little boy and I guess that's to be expected. I am definetely considering using the pump. I am just trying to get over the fear of the sight and Javeyn's feelings. I am sure he will adjust quickly, but in the beginning I just don't know how he will react to a tube in his stomach... :(
     
  14. Ndiggs

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    we don't do sites in her stomach, she too trim and there is not enough fat. Back of arms, thighs, bottom/love handles (can you call them that on a 4 year old) work great and she only notices them if she bangs them into something.

    we use Contact Detach, which have a steel canula that stays in, and a separate port to detach the tube from for bath, ect... and she loves them. Her only complaint is that they don't come in pink
     
  15. Hayden'sMom

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    We were super scared of it....scared of learning how to use it, how our son would like it, how we would ever put the sites in, what it would be like to have it hanging from him all the time.

    Well, we have been using it since July and don't really notice it anymore. He has a spibelt for it and it always just there. Having the remote on the PING makes bolusing him while he is at kindergarten so easy and quick. Diabetes will always have a mind of its' own and somedays the numbers are good and somedays they are terrible. But I find with the pump (unlike MDI), that I have more control and that gives our son more freedom to be like other kids (ie. yes, Hayden, you can have the extra slice of birthday cake, it is okay)...

    all in all, it is your decesion. it is expensive, but in my opinion, it makes diabetes easier.

    good luck to you,
     
  16. cdninct

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    My son's pump arrived on his third birthday, and we started the week after. I can understand why you would have some mental reservations about it, but I would encourage you to pursue the pump if you are otherwise open to it. When you think about it as a tube coming out of his stomach, it seems pretty terrible, but in reality, the tubing is really small, and it doesn't really stick out. It looks a bit like a little electrode (I imagine). And it's not like it's surgically implanted, either--you get to control when and where it goes in, which makes it seem less medical, somehow. It bothered my son for two days (mostly, I think, because I didn't put the site in a great place), and he hasn't looked back since. He has never had a stomach site, either--we generally go with the bum and occasionally the back of the arm. Like a PP said, we use a SPIbelt, too, and I don't think he really notices it is there most of the time. I think it is probably way less of an issue for a three year old than a seven or ten, or fourteen year old who feels peer pressure and has a more defined sense of body image.

    I don't know that the pump has really helped much with his numbers, but it is nice that he can eat when he wants and that we don't always have to chase him down with a needle, squinting to figure out what .25 looks like on the syringe. It has made his having diabetes much easier for everybody.

    Remember, too, that if you try it and don't like it, nothing is stopping you from putting it on a shelf and going back to MDI for a while.
     
  17. ashadams

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    Thanks for the response! I am really nervous about the site of it just being there and how he will react, but from what I have been reading it seems that it only lasts for a few days. I think I can overcome that! It's just so hard right now. Javeyn is only 3 and I do find myself chasing him down with a needle and a meter all of the time it seems like. I know that he has the D and his numbers will never be perfect, but also knowing that his schedule can be a little more flexible makes me feel great.
     
  18. ecs1516

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    My boys were 4 (older one) and 23 months old(younger one) when they went on the pump. They had no problems. Best thing we ever did

    Will not make numbers perfect but make eating more normal
     

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