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Should I teach my 5 yr old to selftest or enter kindergarten with assisted testing?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mmgirls, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    I do not know how to proceed.

    She was DX at 13 months and I have always done the testing for her.

    I mean she knows what to do and has self tested more than a few times, but we are using the dexcom allot when I have it going good.

    School starts end of July and I am trying to fugure out which way to go.

    I am thinking that If I get her self testing good at home first them i will feel comfortable with her self testing in class and just having the nurse or teacher compare to the dexcom. I just do not want her having to leave class just to test.

    Help me figure this out.

    Thoughts
     
  2. StillMamamia

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    If you have a 504 in place (is this also for kindy:confused:), it all depends on what is written on it, I'd say.

    But if the teacher/nurse is ok with that, I'd let my child test UNDER teacher supervision (check that hands are washed/clean, check BG number).

    But this would be the limit of my expectations for the child - just test, let the adults take over the rest. (not saying you implied this)
     
  3. Haleysmom2214

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    This was my daughters first year of school. I wanted her to be independant. I did not have a 504 plan, I told her and the nurse she was to come to the nurses office and my daughter is suppose to test. If the nurse did it that is fine with me too! If she needed anything she could get it from the nurse, and the nurse could call me right on the spot if she is high or low.
     
  4. CAGrandma

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    I'm sure it is your intention to teach your daughter to do her own diabetes care as she gets older and more capable of doing so. Aside from the school issue, do you feel she is ready to learn this skill? It is usually one of the first diabetes care skills that kids learn, so it would be logical to teach her - again, if you feel she is ready to learn it. Same thing with carb counting. Like all skills, that doesn't mean she takes over all responsibility - adult oversight is a good idea for all little kids. And you can always start to teach her to do her own BG and see how it goes - there is no harm in trying it out now at home, is there?
     
  5. denise3099

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    I get what you're saying: Your daughter already knows how to test and has done it several times at home, but is she ready for the responsibility of testing independently?

    Honestly, in my experience, 5 is a little young for the burden. My dd was dx at 4. by 5 she could totally test and knew just waht to do. But the actual responsibility for her to test herself was an emotional burden I didn't want to impose on her. If at the nurse's office she wanted to do it herlself then fine. But the responsibility was the nurse's so dd knew that and felt that someone else was in charge of her care. Last year, just before she turned 7 we gave her the resp. of testing at 10 am in her summer day camp program run in her elementary shcool. Her pump would alarm and she had to go to the counselor, say she wanted to test, and show the counselor her result. the counselor would call me if it was less than say 80 or over 250.

    The mechanics are not different but the burden of being responsible for your own testing, I think, id too much for a 5 yr old. At least this was my experience and you child may be different. Personally, i would ask her if she'd like to test in class or go to the nurse. Or you could set it up with the nurse then see how it goes after a month and revisit it.
     
  6. Flutterby

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    Kaylee has always self tested in school, starting in kindergarten. Then the teacher, or who ever is giving her insulin does the pump stuff.
     
  7. hawkeyegirl

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    Jack just finished kindergarten, and he did not do any of his own testing. He's not ready, and kindergarten was a big enough adjustment for him without pushing him on that. At this age, it is NO big deal for them to have to leave to test. Typically he would leave for scheduled tests when they were putting stuff away, getting ready to go to P.E., lunch, etc., so he missed very little instruction time.

    Go with your instincts on this. There's no right or wrong answer.
     
  8. MamaChrissa

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    J was self testing in K and treating his own lows by the middle of the year.

    He was dx'ed in April and we spent the summer learning how to self test. It was his choice. He wanted some control over his own body and I was more than happy to help him learn. Besides, it made me way more comfortable sending him off without me knowing he could take at least some care of himself. :cwds:
     
  9. selketine

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    This was essentially the same for William when he was in K - he is finishing 2nd grade now. He was not ready to self-test all the time and needed assistance. It was not a big deal to miss some class time in K.

    You have to proceed from your perspective - for some kids it would be too much and for others it would be fine.
     
  10. Annapolis Mom

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    My 5-year-old self-tests in preschool but there is always a teacher around to look over her shoulder and guide her in treating her lows. As we made plans for her to enter kindergarten this fall, we assumed she would test in the classroom. The very helpful school nurse suggested that she begin by testing in the nurses office and that we play it by ear from there. That way, she would become familiar with the health aide and the office staff and they would become familiar with her. If it became important for her to test in the classroom, everyone would have a greater comfort level with it as the year progressed.

    I thought this was a good suggestion and we are going with it.
     
  11. Heather(CA)

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    I will probably get flamed for this, but I think kids should go to the nurse to test through Third grade. I don't mean they can't test themselves before that. I would just like the Health clerk/nurse to see the number.

    As far as testing herself, I would leave that up to her, she will do it when she's ready. Until then I wouldn't worry about it. For sure in Kindergarten she wont miss enough to matter;):D
     
  12. CAGrandma

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    I agree with you, sort of. My 7 year old grandson is very mature and very bright (no bias here) and very capable of doing his own testing. But he is 7. Sometimes he acts childish. (Duh). Sometimes he actually transposes numbers. Sometimes he is low and not thinking clearly. You better believe he needs a trained adult to see the number!

    Where I disagree is that I don't think kids should go anywhere to test - what if they are low? And the adult doesn't have to have a nursing degree to distinguish between 59 and 95.

    And not all kids are ready to do their own testing and that is ok too.
     
  13. sariana

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    I am not sure on how our school does it yet, I will find out more this summer before Caedence goes. But from what I was told, she goes to the nurse first thing in the morning to drop off her case (with meter and all). At lunch, she she must go to the nurse to check her numbers and then go to the lunch room to eat, bringing her tray back to the nurse so that they can see how much she ate. Before leaving on the bus, they check her again and will not let her get on the bus if she runs low. They seem to be pretty much on the ball at this school.

    I meet with them a few weeks before schools starts to train them on the pump and learn everything that I need to know about how this will go. They have a few kids in the school on pumps already, but they do not know the Ping yet. Caedence can check and dose herself on her own as long as she knows the carbs, but I would always want someone watching over her if she is away from me....
     
  14. MNmommy

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    Evan just "graduated" from Kindergarten today. He did his own testing the entire year (dx a little over a month before school started). The secretary treats for lows, corrects for highs and doses for lunch, but Evan does all of the mechanics. He loads the meter, does the finger pokes and knows what his range is. He does NOT fill a syringe, give his own shots or calculate carbs, but he knows if he needs a correction/juice by the number on the screen ~ the secretary does verify the number he tells her ;).

    My opinion is that if she can do the mechanics of it and the nurse does the treatment, then by all means, let her have at it!! :D
     
  15. Charliesmom

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    Charlie is going into K this fall, too. He can check his own blood sugar but doesn't understand the number. I figure if the nurse is going to be there anyway she can test him.
     
  16. zeb'smom

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    Zeb just finished Kindergarten and although he is able to self test he doesn't often want to and I am happy to keep that responsibility off him for as long as possible. He was always allowed to self test if he wanted to with his teacher or teachers assistant looking over his shoulder. Our school has no nurse so going to the nurses office was never an option for us. I was very happy with the care Zeb received this year and in large part I think it was due to the fact that all his care was done in the classroom by his teacher. His kit was with him everywhere he went and he always had a trained adult close by. Our school is small, just shy of 400 students K-8th, but remembering the large school I went to as a child makes me very glad Zeb didn't have to walk to the nurses office 3+ times a day just to test.

    Everyone's school is different as is what will work best for you and your child. For us having Zeb test/tested in the classroom with his teachers doing all his care worked wonderfully this year. As a matter of fact so wonderfully that I cried saying goodbye to his teachers yesterday and am afraid they have spoiled me....how can any other teacher be so wonderful?
    I would suggest getting into the school and talking to the K teacher(s)....find out how CWD's have done it in the past at your school, how far of a walk is it to the nurse's office?, who is going to be trained for your child's care?

    Good luck, I hope you have as great a Kindergarten year as Zeb just did!
     
  17. mamamccoy87

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    I sub for the nurse at my dd's school. We have 5 kids with T1, one of whom just finished kindergarten. Our kids come to the nurses office to test and administer insulin. The kindergartener would self test with nurse supervision (Type 1 since age 3), we would interpret results and administer insulin injection. If she was not feeling good (low) we would help her test. 3rd grader (my dd) would test under nurse supervision, let us know how much she ate of snack or lunch (i provided carb counts) and we would figure carb count and administer via pump. same with 1 other pumper. 2 older kids, one with pump who would come to nurses office to self check, then does her own carb counts, bolus with pump. Other older kid who came in to check, would have carb count on sheet from home with bolus needed for carbs, we would help figure dose if high, or help with lows. Hope this helps - if your child is comfortable self testing, and you are comfortable with them self testing, that's fine but they still need to be supervised while testing.
     
  18. mamamccoy87

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    I'm all for that - I think even through JH. If they are feeling fine its ok but if they are low or high, they may not be thinking clearly enough to evaluate/treat. I also have my daughter carry a purse with meter, fast acting sugar, and a snack in case she is at a special class, nurse is at lunch, fire drill, etc and she feels low (did have a fire drill one time after first dxd, and she felt low during - scary)
     
  19. hawkeyegirl

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    I agree with thisyou and Heather on this one, especially for my son. He honestly just lives in la-la land half the time. The sort of kid who when you tell him to go get his PJs on, you'll find him a half and hour later, buck naked in his room digging through his toy box because some shiny object distracted him midway through the PJ finding process. He will need adult supervision to test and bolus for a long, long time to come.

    I, personally, am in no hurry for him to do his own care. When he starts wanting freedom, he will then have incentive to do it, but right now, he's not ready, and that's totally fine with me. He's 6. The time for him to have to think about D will come, but for now, I'm cool with him just thinking about Legos, Star Wars, and what's for dessert. :)
     
  20. Heather(CA)

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    Check with your nurse/health clerk. But this might make you feel better about fire drills. During a fire drill the nurse has a box she grabs on the way out that has supplies in it the kids may need. If I were you I would double check and make sure there are juice boxes and tabs in that box:cwds:
     

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