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Short sprint prevents low blood sugar postexercise

Discussion in 'Sports and Athletics' started by munchkingirl, Mar 16, 2006.

  1. munchkingirl

    munchkingirl Approved members

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    Short sprint prevents low blood sugar postexercise

    Mar 09 (Reuters Health) - A 10-second maximal sprint after moderate-intensity exercise reduces the risk of postexercise hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in young people with insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes, according to a study.

    This study, the researchers say, "provides the first evidence that a short maximal sprint effort performed immediately after moderate-intensity exercise is preferable to only resting as a means to counter a further fall in glycemia after exercise, thus decreasing the risk of early postexercise hypoglycemia in individuals with type 1 diabetes."

    "On this basis," they write in the journal Diabetes Care, "one might tentatively recommend that after exercise of moderate intensity, young individuals with complication-free type 1 diabetes consider performing a short 10-second sprint to counter a further fall in their blood glucose level...particularly if a source of dietary carbohydrate is not readily available."

    But in comments to Reuters Health, study investigator Dr. Paul A. Fournier cautioned that while the use of a 10-second sprint "constitutes a novel and simple approach to decrease the risk of post-exercise hypoglycemia that will revolutionize blood glucose management in type 1 diabetes, it would be premature and irresponsible at this stage to advocate its widespread adoption, because much more research is required to identify the target population of type 1 diabetic patients likely to be responsive."

    "So far," Fournier emphasized, "only healthy young individuals have been tested in our study, and all have responded positively."

    Fournier, from the University of Western Australia, Crawley, and colleagues investigated whether a 10-second maximal sprint could counter the continual decline in blood sugar during recovery from moderate-intensity exercise in seven type 1 diabetic men, who were an average of 21 years old.

    After 20 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise, the subjects experienced a rapid and significant decrease in blood glucose levels, the authors report.

    However, a 10-second maximal sprint immediately following the moderate-intensity exercise stopped a further decline in blood glucose levels for the next 2 hours, the results indicate.

    In contrast, moderate-intensity exercise followed by a rest period led to a further decrease in blood glucose levels.

    Fournier notes that more study is needed in other groups of type 1 diabetic patients such as children and sedentary middle-aged individuals. "It is our view that the effect of sprinting on reducing the risk of post-exercise hypoglycemia is probably not as marked in children and sedentary middle-age individuals with type 1 diabetes, in part, due to their reduced capacity to engage in a maximal sprint effort," he told Reuters Health.

    SOURCE: Diabetes Care March, 2006.


    Publish Date: March 09, 2006
    http://diabetes.healthcentersonline.com/newsstories/shortsprintpreventslowbloodsugar.cfm
     
  2. jlwilts

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    It would help if 'maximal sprint' was defined.

    Max heart rate for a 21 yr old is about 200bpm. It would be very difficult to raise your heart rate to that level in 10 seconds.

    If the hypo is avoided because sugar is released from the liver isn't that increasing the risk of a delayed onset hypo?
     
  3. munchkingirl

    munchkingirl Approved members

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    I know! that is the exact same problem that I have had in getting my mind around in this article.

    In my mind - it just releases more of a "liver dump" in you blood stream but also at the same time makes your body going to want more sugar and it'll just crash harder later.

    ...i dunno. Just strange to me.
     
  4. jlwilts

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    I have asked for a copy of the study from one of Dr Fourniers colleagues. Unfortunately she wasn't directly involved in this study but has forwarded my request to the study co ordinator and asked me to send a reminder if I don't receive a reply.
    Will PM you when I receive a reply.

    The study is relevant to me as my post race/weekend exercises tend to be for 'recovery' and may well be near to the level of intensity of exercise at which the study was conducted. Unfortunately I am 50 years old so a direct comparision between myself and the 21 year old study participants may not be possible.( I can't help wondering if I might actually be fitter than them:cwds: )


    http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/people/wt/JohnLewis.htm
     
  5. munchkingirl

    munchkingirl Approved members

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    Thanks.

    i am a gymnast and have problems with lows - or erring on the low side the rest of the day after working out. The thing I don't understand is - I do run directly beforehand and afterwards - not for very long either. so... Yeah, it would be really interesting to see what is said.

    ha, yeah, it is really amazing, to be honest, how many people really just don't care about being in the best shape.

    good job on your successes!
     
  6. jlwilts

    jlwilts Approved members

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    Maximal Sprint

    The reply received summarises down to the basic point that the study was ONLY interested in investigating the rise in blood sugars caused by high intensity exercise and applying this to a post moderate exercise situation to see if a continuing fall in blood sugars could be prevented. They found that a continuing fall could be prevented as per the study results.

    I have been unable to obtain any more information than that already published.

    I hope the study team continue with their work and expand its scope.

    When I race I am at high intensity, a minimum of 90% maximum heart rate for a minimum of 30 minutes excluding cool down, so unfortunately the study results will be of no immediate benefit.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2006
  7. jlwilts

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    You don't mention adjusting the amount of insulin you use. I presume you reduce your dose in advance of activity or consume extra carbs. I found that as I lost weight became fitter and leaner my sensitivity to insulin increased. As a gymnast you are probably even leaner and fitter than I am so I would expect you to be extraordinarily sensitive to insulin/ increased activity
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2006
  8. jlwilts

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    The full text of original study

    The full text of the original study can be found here

    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/29/3/601

    Answers to your FAQ's are
    1) Maximal sprint is not defined. Study participants were asked to cycle 'as hard as possible' for 10 seconds.

    2) Study participants were not already hypoglycemic at the time of the sprint. It is possible to calculate that participants had an approximate average bg of 7.6mmol at the start of the 10 sec sprint.

    3) The study showed that any further drop in blood sugars after the end of the sprint was limited until up to 2 hours afterwards, those who did not 'sprint' after the end of the 20 minute exercise period experienced an average drop of 3.6mmol in bg's greater than those who did 'sprint'.

    4) The 'sprint' does not prevent a hypo, it only delays it, the 2 hour delay hopefully giving the person with diabetes enough time to find and eat some carbs.
     
  9. butterflygal291

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    i've found that out somewhat. i'm on the swim team where i do a lot of sprints. my sugars tend to go high instead of low, but when i swam for 20 min. straight my sugars were fine
     

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