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Seizure

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Yonina, Sep 6, 2011.

  1. Yonina

    Yonina New Member

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    My 14 yr old son has diabetes since January 2011. He's been excellent about taking insulin, but has lately become lazy about testing his blood sugar. This morning he had a seizure (his first one) as a result (apparently) of low blood sugar and I'm a wreck--I've been keeping my cool around him, so he's actually doing well. But when he was resting today, I really fell apart. I have great support from family and the medical team, but while I was afraid when he was diagnosed, I didn't have the absolute terror that I had today. (note, he'll be going on a sensor within a week!) Any tips or comments are appreciated
    Yonina
     
  2. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

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    Welcome to the site. Sorry you are dealing with this. His seizure may have had nothing to do with diabetes. Since you are not sure why he had the seizure, will you be having him evaluated to determine the cause of it?

    Although having a seizure is a horrible thing to experience, maybe this will "motivate" him to do a better job with managing his diabetes? So maybe a little good will come from something bad.
     
  3. PatriciaMidwest

    PatriciaMidwest Approved members

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    Sorry to hear this -- very scary indeed. Did your endo recommend any testing to determine the cause? There are tests to rule out epileptic seizures if you are unsure what caused this.

    I have a 14 year old also, so I can relate to your post! It's tough to keep them on track sometimes. We have to let them make mistakes, but yet we hope they are small.

    I hope you find CGMS very helpful. I don't know what we would do without it - it's a wonderful thing.
     
  4. bnmom

    bnmom Approved members

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    So sorry for what you guys went through, I can only imagine how scary that was for you.

    My 14yr old is really lazy about taking readings, its so hard to keep him on track. I'm an awful nag, but if I don't nag him he just blows it off. :mad:

    Does your son feel his lows? Be sure to mention to the doctor if he doesn't, they may have some strategies to help with that.

    I know I've seen other posts about seizures, so hopefully some of those parents will chime in for you. In the meantime, hugs to you both!
     
  5. Lee

    Lee Approved members

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    Honestly, I would not lay the blame on him. Seizures happen and lows happen and there may not be an apparent reason. My daughter has had 3 seizures, all between 3am and 6 am. That is when they are most vulnerable, at least according to my endo.

    Did you talk to your endo? They need to know. Also, they should have you run him between 150 and 200 for the next few days to rebuild his glycogen stores.

    Seizures are the worst - they are incredibly frightening.
     
  6. Yonina

    Yonina New Member

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    thanks

    thanks for the support and the advice. I spoke to the endo within an hour of the seizure--he's a wonderful doctor and he gives his cell phone number to all of his patients and he always answers the phone. Together with our family doctor and the endo we decided not to get an EEG yesterday, but will reconsider together in 2 weeks. The endo felt that it was only diabetes related (when he hears hooves, he sees horses, not zebras). The endo instructed my son to reduce his insulin flow betw. midnite and 6 am. My son was very cooperative yesterday, sharing with me his blood sugar results and it was a quiet night and morning--his blood sugar was 104 in the morning! I'm trying to be careful with my son, not to be to bossy and respect his privacy but I do need to track what's going on. It's a tricky balance with teens. Thanks again!
     
  7. Lee

    Lee Approved members

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    It is very tricky and he is still only 14 and new to the disease. I would recommend reading his meter at least once a day. Our endo also suggests that they not make any insulin dosing decisions at this age as well. It is a hard balance between independence and supervision, but I see it like this:

    I do not let my young teenager take life-risking chances - she isn't old enough to drive, drink, serve in the military, or vote - why is she old enough to be responsible for D?

    Good luck! I hope you find that tricky balance! We are coming off of a summer of independence and I had to put an end to it based on her highest A1C ever...now we are back to mom being in charge of it all again, even down to tracking site changes and pre-boluses.
     
  8. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

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    IMHO, a 14 year old is too young to take on 100% of the the responsibility to manage diabetes. I would be checking his meter, verifying he counted the carbs correctly and gave the correct amount of insulin. I would help him record the readings, food eaten and insulin given to look for patterns (or do it myself and share with him.) This disease is hard for an adult to manage and a teen has other things on his mind.

    My son has done it on his own, and appreciates the help.
     
  9. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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  10. lisac

    lisac Approved members

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    My husband is a T1 and has been for 15 yrs. He got SO lazy about testing that when we suspected that our daughter was D also, we had to borrow a meter and test strips from his uncle! I had hoped her dx would make him take better care of himself...it didn't. Then he got up one morning, didn't test, took his morning insulin, then went to buy groceries with our 3 kids (I was at work.) He had a seizure, flipping the grocery cart with our DD in it. That was enough for him. He just went to see an endo for the first time ever and is trying hard to take better care of himself. So, maybe some good will come from your son's seizure. I know it sounds bad, but maybe this will scare him into trying a little harder.
     

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