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School responsibilities?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by wkat, Jan 28, 2008.

  1. wkat

    wkat Approved members

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    My son goes to a public school. He isn't on insulin yet but his doctors felt we should tell the school at this point (if you haven't read my previous posts). We are going to get a 504 when we have more specific needs determined, but the current stance from the school is that they have a nurse 3 days a week (made up of one f/t nurse who is there 1x and someone from an agency who is there 2x but is not totally reliable) and that we should fill in the rest. I work p/t and am not comfortable with their position. The school principal has a very strong position on not getting any personnel involved. There are no current state laws in IL to deal with this, but legislation has been written to deal with this and has passed in the house but not IL senate. I believe it is not unreasonable to have coverage for five days. What are "reasonable accommodations?" My son loves his school and has a lot of friends. I don't feel we should find another school because they don't want to abide by the law, but I'm wondering if asking me to come to school two times a week, maybe more, could be considered "reasonable?" Thanks for any input.

    Wendy
    T1 33 years
    son, age 4, w/ early onset
     
  2. momtojess

    momtojess Approved members

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    Its Federal Law that they have to provide someone to care for you childs medical needs while he is at school, and they can not make you go there to do it on days they dont have someone. Ont eh same note, if he is going to the school he is zoned for, they can not make him go to a different school just because they dont want to get someone to care for him there.
     
  3. MamaChrissa

    MamaChrissa Approved members

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    What Tammy said! They are responsible for giving your child a "free and appropriate" education. For a child with D, medical care is appropriate. "Reasonable Accomodations" is such a fuzzy term. Its been debated since it came out. Basically, they have the responsibility to get your son all the services he requires. Denying him is illegal.
     
  4. Charmed7

    Charmed7 Approved members

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    Just a side note, my son was in a school with only an assistant FT in the office, and a RN that alternated between two schools (within a few miles of eachother) If there was need for a nurse, then the RN would come over to treat. He was on NPH/Humalog, so his insulin needs were only when his blood sugar was high.

    I would start doing some research into federal laws (vs State Laws) and be prepared to state your case. Your son has a "disability" and the school cannot discrimate against it. Your son has a right to go to that school without risk to his health.

    Good luck,

    Charmed
     
  5. Heather(CA)

    Heather(CA) Approved members

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    Who takes care of the skinned knees when the nurse isn't there? Our school has a health clerk that takes care of Seth, she knows way more than the nurse that's there 3 days a week. Maybe that person could handle it? You should not have to go to school, sorry your having to deal with this:(
     
  6. Flutterby

    Flutterby Approved members

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    I second (or third) what the others have said.. if its a public school they have to have some trained to provide for him!
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

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    Go into this knowing that it is not the principal's decision to " not get any personnel involved" ! Your son goes to a public school, period. Accomodations must be made for his safety. You cannot be pressured into coming in to provide care.
     
  8. BlessedIAm

    BlessedIAm Approved members

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    Your plight sounds strangely familiar to what I experienced here last year after our DS was diagnosed. We ended up pulling him out of school but I realize that not everyone would have the option or be willing to exercise the option we did. I was working from home at the time he was diagnosed but has since quit working. His school just got a FT nurse in December. We plan on meeting with the principal and the new nurse before the close of this school year. I find the "reasonal accomodations" clause too muddled for me too.

    If you aren't getting anywhere with the school principal you have no choice but to go over her/his head to the district office.

    Best of luck.
     
  9. Tamara Gamble

    Tamara Gamble Approved members

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    You need to call 1-800-diabetes and ask for the school discrimination package also ask for an advocate in your state. They can help you and their free. By the way the OCR does not feel that any accomodation needed for diabetes is unreasonable so if you needed to go that far it wouldn't be a problem. So reasonable accomodations does not even apply as far as I'm concerned. You don't need a nurse sixty percent of schools in MI don't have them and quite frankly as an advocate I think they are more trouble than they are worth. Consistantly trying to over ride the parents and doc etc. We have two health aids in my sons school who are well trained, wonderful and don't give me any grief, they just do what they are asked to do and if need be will administer glucagon. Your son must be covered at all times at school federal law requires it. It does not however need to be a nurse unless your state requires it, then the school has to have medical personel there. Good luck to you.

    Tami
     
  10. wkat

    wkat Approved members

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    Unfortunately, in IL the nurse's association passed something recently that says if a nurse is present, they may not delegate tasks to an unlicensed medical person. I have the form from ADA for the advocate and need to send it in to try and make more sense of how this affects things when the nurse isn't present, which is much of the time at Chicago public schools. I agree, non-medical professionals can help, especially with bs checks, but this school, or at least, this principal is adamant about not getting staff involved. I have all the numbers to call if I need to but I am hoping to resolve this before having to go to her boss or OCR. My son is only in Pre-K. What a terrible way to start things out with a school. Thanks for all the input, everyone.

    Wendy
     

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