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School Entrance Exams and BG

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by DavidN, Dec 13, 2013.

  1. DavidN

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    Here is my son's BG in the hours leading up to, and during, his recent SSAT testing (testing was from 9am to 1pm). Dinner the night before was poorly planned, he spiked. We were out of bread for his egg and cheese sandwich for breakfast, so he had a bagel. Bagels are a huge challenge. Anyway, here's what happened. See attached.

    Would your child's testing performance be adversely affected with these levels? Haven't gotten his scores but I'm assuming his was. Now trying to figure out what or if there's anything I can do about it.
     
  2. Mish

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    I'd wait and see what happens. ;)

    For my son, I feel like lows are much more problematic as far as thinking and test taking are concerned. But a spike after breakfast like that (which also could be some adrenaline pumping from the test) wouldn't be any cause for concern.

    Honestly, I think we (all) run the risk of making too much of a big deal over this stuff. Spikes in BGs are going to happen, and a child or adult is going to be expected to perform, regardless.
     
  3. hawkeyegirl

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    I've never seen much correlation between Jack's BG and his test results, although I'm sure there would be if he was very, very low, or very, very high.

    How important are these test results? The title of your post is "School Entrance Exams", so I'm thinking they are something more than just annual standardized testing.
     
  4. Lisa - Aidan's mom

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    Hopefully he did well.

    DS took state exams last year; 4 days of testing at about 1 1/2 - 2 hours each day. His #s were horrible, the testing was first thing in the morning and I don't think there was time he wasn't 300+ sadly. I believe some of it was due to adrenaline, some of it normal breakfast spikes. Nurse would check his BG in between each section. DS and the other boy w/ D were in a separate room for the exams.
    Months later the results came and they were exactly what I expected, aced the math and science and did so-so on the writing/English part.

    Good luck to your DS.
     
  5. mocha

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    I do notice, for me, that I have more brain fog that usual for the mornings if I'm running high for extended periods.

    I'd wait and see what happens. They probably aren't going to be as good as if he were normal, but probably not too much of a decrease (hopefully).
     
  6. ksartain

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    Christopher is only 7, so take that into consideration, but his teacher has said he is very forgetful and foggy when he is low. When he is on the high side, it's harder for him to concentrate and he gets very introspective. When we start standardized testing, we're really going to have to tweak his 504 to help him be as successful as he can.
     
  7. obtainedmist

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    Unless I'm reading incorrectly, it looks like he didn't dip below 70. I would wait and see as others have mentioned. In the future, you might check to see about accommodations. I know that for the SAT's that kids take in HS, you can apply for accommodations. In that situation, I'm fairly sure that your son would have to take the test in a room by himself and a proctor.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
  8. Megnyc

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    Honestly, that doesn't look that bad. I would be more concerned about the fact that he was probably a bit groggy from spending the majority of the night in the 200s than the breakfast spike. Personally, I don't find brief spikes are as bad as being high all night.

    I know when I took the SSAT you could take it multiple times and I can't imagine that has changed. I would wait to get the score and then evaluate his options. If his score is too low for his target schools then I would suggest finding a way to get his blood sugar in a better range before he takes it again. Whether or not you disclose to the schools the reason he retook it is something you would need to discuss with whoever handles applications to secondary schools at his current school.

    If it makes you feel any better I took the SAT after spending the night in the 400s with ketones and could not have done any better. I was a horrible cranky mess when my dad dropped me off for it and we immediately signed me up to retake it when I got home. Then my guidance counselor called with in a few weeks with the results and we were totally shocked! I hope you are pleasantly surprised to!
     
  9. sincity2003

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    DS had to take the GMADE and GRADE in 2nd grade last year, to determine his placement in 3rd grade. Keep in mind, his school district absolutely refuses to give any Type 1 a 504 plan, and they do not provide accomodations of any kind for testing. The Sunday night before the test, his BG was 459. We got him into the high 200s by early morning. The child who had kept a 100 in math all year long, scored an 84 on the GMADE and was placed in his 3rd grade class based on this score.
    We've had issues with this all along, because for addition/subtraction math facts, DS can do 60+ in a minute, and the next closest kid in his class is doing 24. They are doing multiplication and he's doing 45-50 in a minute, the next closest kid is doing 10.
    So yeah, I truly believe BG has a huge impact on how they test, whether it be from anxiety, or the wind blowing the wrong way, it still has an effect.
     
  10. caspi

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    I totally agree.
     
  11. mmgirls

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    I guess I come from the frame of mind that life happens, even to adults. We will not always get the opportunity for a redo.

    That in mind, we do have a 504 in place, that covers testing.
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    We just marked year 11. Mine was four at dx so she's never known school or assessments without D. After wrestling with this issue long and hard here's my conclusion: our kids will always be at risk of being at a disadvantage in snapshot assessments. It sucks, it's unfair and all that, but it is what it is.

    I try to set in place every contingency plan I can - I do not demand special room/stop the clock testing, though I haven't ruled it out if it's something that my kid would consider in the future. Most of all, I try to raise a balanced kid who does her best to perform day in and day out, who participated in lots of varied activities from sports to music to volunteer work and I accept that sometimes the standardized test thing will not go as well as it might but that overall, she's a great student and a balanced human being.

    I'm not implying that you are doing otherwise, just suggesting that standardized tests are in fact more complicated with Type 1 and that it's helpful to try and see them within the context of the whole kid, and to encourage others (ie admissions officers) to do so as well.

    Hope the scores end up being great.:cwds:
     
  13. ChristineJ

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    Are you in the US, dealing with a public school? They can NOT refuse to give a 504 plan. Sect. 504 is a Federal law, and they have no choice but to follow it.

    http://www.diabetes.org/living-with...-at-school/legal-protections/section-504.html

    Christine
     
  14. sincity2003

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    Yes, we are, and yes, we know they are violating Federal law, but the wheels of justice move very, very slowly. We are leaving this county and moving to the county south of us at the end of this school year, who we've already been in contact with and will give him a 504 plan.
    The Federal government moves at their own pace though when complaints are filed.
     
  15. Mom264

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    I'm not sure what can be done about the SSAT scores after the fact, except to retake it if his score seems out of character to you.
    If you do have him take it again, you can request accommodations. When dd took the SSAT I requested and got these. She was allowed to monitor her sensor and test bg whenever she needed to. Also if BG was out of range, she would not take test. She had access to food and water. The proctor was informed prior, and was given a D-cheat sheet.

    DD- stayed in range the whole time, but we felt much better that everyone was on board with her needs.
    I hope everything works out well for your son!
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2013
  16. KatieSue

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    You can re-take the SAT. My daughter took it twice, the second time to see if she could up her score a bit, which she did.

    We put accommodations in place but not stop clock. Just that she could keep her meter in the room and have access to water and snacks if needed. That did mean she was put in a separate room. She said it was great because it was a counselors conference room and the chairs were cushy :)
     
  17. ChristineJ

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    Oh, that's good. (Not the slow wheels of justice, lol, but the impending move to a different county.) I'm glad the new district sounds like they are much more accommodating! :)

    Christine
     
  18. lisanc

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    Blood sugar levels definitely affect my daughter's test scores ... both high and low ... so we have agreement with school that if she is outside of a specified range, she does not test ...

    but as others have said ... life happens ... you try your best and that is all you can do ...
     
  19. wilf

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    DD wouldn't miss a beat with those numbers. Highs above 300 and lows below 60 are hard on her ability to concentrate..

    We have asked for a retest on I believe 2 occasions over her high school career where she really felt she wasn't able to be at her best and feeling the effects of lows.
     
  20. Beach bum

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    My daughter's cognitive abilities aren't impacted by breakfast spikes. However, if she came down at a very fast rate say going from 250-100 then that would be of concern to her. But normally this doesn't happen after breakfast spikes.

    We treat these situations as a wait and see.
    Good luck on the testing!
     

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